Date   

Re: Odroid XU-4 or?

Stu C
 

I was running a couple of virtual machines under VMware Esxi server for WSPR and FT8, the CPU is a i3-6100 and combined some days I'd hit about 60,000 spots.
That Virtual host is also running about four other uses at any one time, including a Virtual Win 10 desktop.

As rob says the instantaneous CPU is what seems to make a big difference, I could tell if FT8 decoding stopped as the host fan stopped the rhythmic cycling under load.

Stu


Re: Odroid XU-4 or?

Glenn Elmore
 

The eBay ThinkCentres suggested by Holger are much more capable than RPI4s and pretty small, low power and affordable. I think they can handle 50+ wspr bands even when bands are busy. 
I've been running one totally headless for some time with excellent results.

On Jul 22, 2021 7:18 AM, Rolf Ekstrand <rekstrand@...> wrote:
Greetings y'all

Thinking about making some additions here to expand my set up here as the condx are improving on the higher bands.  This means additional antennas and of course more Kiwis, and as I am running a Rpi4 here I guess there also have to be some thought about replacing this. Thus I like to put the question out there. Would for example an Odroid XU-4 be a better choice or is there something else out there in regards to reasonable priced SBC's     In regards to this I must also consider the Internet service as we are on a connection  here (Thanks Spectrum ) that consistently fails or slows down to a mere crawl.  Well that's why we use the WD, but with more Kiwis it will put more load on the system and we probably need something else than the Rpi4.

Any thoughts regarding this?

73  Rolf K9DZT



 
 


Re: Odroid XU-4 or?

Rob Robinett
 

Yes, the Pis and Odroids are not good long term platforms for WD.
I have been very happy with the used Lenovo Thinkcentre m93p Tiny with an i5/8GB which cost less than $100.  It consumes 10W at idle which jumps to 36W during the 1-=20 seconds that WD is decoding wav files. But any i5+ with 4+GB RAM is a good long term choice for WD sites.
CPU performance, reliability and low power consumption are available on many x86 platforms, just choose one which is supported by Ubuntu 20.x

On Thu, Jul 22, 2021 at 7:58 AM Edward Hammond <manager@...> wrote:

I have fun with SBCs but I don't regret recently switching to a more full blown system. 

I was lucky to have an underutilized Intel NUC in the shack. It's not new. I believe it is a 7th generation processor, dual core, not the quad.  Ubuntu was an easy install.  The CPU tests as being about the same, maybe slightly better (~10%), than the eBay used machine that Rob mentioned here a couple months ago, though I think the NUC is still more expensive (though probably less power hungry). 

A major motivator for me was that decoding FST4W with WD will be, per Rob, considerably more CPU intensive.

I literally haven't touched the NUC since the first time I ran WSPRDaemon after the install.  Except to use the display to show PSK Reporter or wspr.rocks maps while WD runs in the background.

God bless the SBCs but I'm not going back.

Edward

W3ENR



On 7/22/21 10:18 AM, Rolf Ekstrand wrote:
Greetings y'all

Thinking about making some additions here to expand my set up here as the condx are improving on the higher bands.  This means additional antennas and of course more Kiwis, and as I am running a Rpi4 here I guess there also have to be some thought about replacing this. Thus I like to put the question out there. Would for example an Odroid XU-4 be a better choice or is there something else out there in regards to reasonable priced SBC's     In regards to this I must also consider the Internet service as we are on a connection  here (Thanks Spectrum ) that consistently fails or slows down to a mere crawl.  Well that's why we use the WD, but with more Kiwis it will put more load on the system and we probably need something else than the Rpi4.

Any thoughts regarding this?

73  Rolf K9DZT



 
 



--
Rob Robinett
AI6VN
mobile: +1 650 218 8896


Re: Odroid XU-4 or?

Edward Hammond
 

I have fun with SBCs but I don't regret recently switching to a more full blown system. 

I was lucky to have an underutilized Intel NUC in the shack. It's not new. I believe it is a 7th generation processor, dual core, not the quad.  Ubuntu was an easy install.  The CPU tests as being about the same, maybe slightly better (~10%), than the eBay used machine that Rob mentioned here a couple months ago, though I think the NUC is still more expensive (though probably less power hungry). 

A major motivator for me was that decoding FST4W with WD will be, per Rob, considerably more CPU intensive.

I literally haven't touched the NUC since the first time I ran WSPRDaemon after the install.  Except to use the display to show PSK Reporter or wspr.rocks maps while WD runs in the background.

God bless the SBCs but I'm not going back.

Edward

W3ENR



On 7/22/21 10:18 AM, Rolf Ekstrand wrote:
Greetings y'all

Thinking about making some additions here to expand my set up here as the condx are improving on the higher bands.  This means additional antennas and of course more Kiwis, and as I am running a Rpi4 here I guess there also have to be some thought about replacing this. Thus I like to put the question out there. Would for example an Odroid XU-4 be a better choice or is there something else out there in regards to reasonable priced SBC's     In regards to this I must also consider the Internet service as we are on a connection  here (Thanks Spectrum ) that consistently fails or slows down to a mere crawl.  Well that's why we use the WD, but with more Kiwis it will put more load on the system and we probably need something else than the Rpi4.

Any thoughts regarding this?

73  Rolf K9DZT



 
 


Odroid XU-4 or?

Rolf Ekstrand
 

Greetings y'all

Thinking about making some additions here to expand my set up here as the condx are improving on the higher bands.  This means additional antennas and of course more Kiwis, and as I am running a Rpi4 here I guess there also have to be some thought about replacing this. Thus I like to put the question out there. Would for example an Odroid XU-4 be a better choice or is there something else out there in regards to reasonable priced SBC's     In regards to this I must also consider the Internet service as we are on a connection  here (Thanks Spectrum ) that consistently fails or slows down to a mere crawl.  Well that's why we use the WD, but with more Kiwis it will put more load on the system and we probably need something else than the Rpi4.

Any thoughts regarding this?

73  Rolf K9DZT



 
 


Re: Question on Antenna design - will mismatch alone change antenna radiation pattern ?

ON5KQ
 

Thanks for answers. Jim and Glenn...
I am just curious, why I felt to be often unsuccesful with antennas, which are planned to be resonant on 15m (for example) usually work by far less good on a different band compared to  a well matched.

So I will try to build it during the coming summer ...

See you on Wednesday meeting...

Ulli, ON5KQ


Re: Question on Antenna design - will mismatch alone change antenna radiation pattern ?

Jim Lill
 

If the mismatched portion of the system includes the feedline, a "hot" feedline can skew the pattern in some cases.

On 7/20/21 10:37 AM, Glenn Elmore wrote:

Not claiming to be an expert but I would say that pattern is due to response in the far field.  As long as the 'matching' or other radiating mechanisms don't  have significant radiation compared to the 'antenna' then that response won't change.

Having said that, the *apparent* pattern can change. If mismatch gets high enough that other mechanisms, not intended to be included in what one calls the 'antenna', become significant compared to the desired/intended one then the pattern and performance can indeed change be different. 

This second situation is essentially what happens with common mode ingress. That which one *thinks* is the antenna is not really the total of what is providing response at the receiver.  Once intended antenna (mismatched) signals get down to the level of other signals, such as CM then the effective pattern is no longer entirely due to the intended antenna.

This problem can be aggravated by electrically small antennas which though they intercept the same aperture and, were they matched, would deliver the same signal power, deliver very small voltage or current levels due to their preamplifiers because of the low radiation resistance and high reactance and imperfect matching.

Perhaps surprisingly, were we able to perfectly match a [1 cm] dipole at 160m it would have just about the same performance as a full half wave. Of course we can't do that with materials we have, probably not even with super conductors so in practice this doesn't occur. 

But the general idea of using "something" as an antenna, no matter whether the feedpoint impedance is near something easy to access with reasonable matching materials, is perfectly fine as long as one compares the resulting mismatch to the target at a particular frequency of interest.  That target starts to get difficult at the high end of HF where we want to get increasingly close (or below) KTB. It's for this reason that either a loop, such as described by LZ1AQ, or my dipoles both fail to achieve the ITU 'quiet rural' noise floor at 10m.  More or less, it takes larger structures to get something that has a chance of 'not too bad' match over broader frequency range with a finite number of real components.


Re: Question on Antenna design - will mismatch alone change antenna radiation pattern ?

Glenn Elmore
 

Not claiming to be an expert but I would say that pattern is due to response in the far field.  As long as the 'matching' or other radiating mechanisms don't  have significant radiation compared to the 'antenna' then that response won't change.

Having said that, the *apparent* pattern can change. If mismatch gets high enough that other mechanisms, not intended to be included in what one calls the 'antenna', become significant compared to the desired/intended one then the pattern and performance can indeed change be different. 

This second situation is essentially what happens with common mode ingress. That which one *thinks* is the antenna is not really the total of what is providing response at the receiver.  Once intended antenna (mismatched) signals get down to the level of other signals, such as CM then the effective pattern is no longer entirely due to the intended antenna.

This problem can be aggravated by electrically small antennas which though they intercept the same aperture and, were they matched, would deliver the same signal power, deliver very small voltage or current levels due to their preamplifiers because of the low radiation resistance and high reactance and imperfect matching.

Perhaps surprisingly, were we able to perfectly match a [1 cm] dipole at 160m it would have just about the same performance as a full half wave. Of course we can't do that with materials we have, probably not even with super conductors so in practice this doesn't occur. 

But the general idea of using "something" as an antenna, no matter whether the feedpoint impedance is near something easy to access with reasonable matching materials, is perfectly fine as long as one compares the resulting mismatch to the target at a particular frequency of interest.  That target starts to get difficult at the high end of HF where we want to get increasingly close (or below) KTB. It's for this reason that either a loop, such as described by LZ1AQ, or my dipoles both fail to achieve the ITU 'quiet rural' noise floor at 10m.  More or less, it takes larger structures to get something that has a chance of 'not too bad' match over broader frequency range with a finite number of real components.


Question on Antenna design - will mismatch alone change antenna radiation pattern ?

ON5KQ
 

I have a fundamental question - may be Glenn or other experts can answer:

I have a nice antenna in mind to build up for reception only (Wsprdaemon)
However this design is only well matched at a single band. Neglecting any radiating feedline or common-mode effects, the NEC2 model tells me however, that even with high mismatch  on other bands the radiation pattern would be different but also very beneficial.

Now for the practical construction, I wonder:
- if I would put a buffer pre-amplifier directly at the feedpoint (where the source in the NEC2 model is) and therefore do not introduce a feedline at all between antenna and pre-amp, would the radiation pattern will be any different than what the NEC2 models tells me, because of the heavy mismatch between the antenna impedance and the input impedance of the amplifier ? Would it require any special pre-amp to keep the radiation pattern unchanged to the NEC2 model ?

From theory I would say that there is no change in radiation pattern, rather than most likely a heavy drop in antenna efficiency (losses)... however from practical builds, my experience is completely different! Heavily mismatched antennas never really worked, even with a pre-amp...
(The design is for the high bands 10Mhz and higher)

As it would be some significant work to build it up - what do you think..?
Just go for it, even though it is a single band design and even though Wsprdaemon requires broadband performance ?
(but for reception with active feed)

What do I need to pay attention for, if I want to feed it with a pre-amp for wideband use, although the wire construction shows a narrowband characteristic at 75Ohm feedline (RG6)

Ulli, ON5KQ


Re: Has anyone run auto-wspr and/or WD on a RaspSDR?

VE3VXO
 

I am about to embark on this adventure myself but waiting for my hardware to arrive and am pretty clueless about linux although I did install ubuntu on a machine once  and did a few command line things (following instructions I found online) but if there are those who set this up and got it working I could certainly benefit from a few pointers when the time comes.

Browsing the messages on this list I realise I am pretty much in the deep end of the pool here....



---------- Original Message ----------
From: Rob Robinett <rob@...>
Date: July 17, 2021 at 7:02 PM

I forget who it was who reported that loading a new version of the kiwi code got their RaspberryPi working in autowspr and with WD.

In the conf file you should need only to define the KIWI receiver as on localhost, e.g.:

declare RECEIVER_LIST=(
         "KIWI_0                    localhost:8073     AI6VN         CM87tj    NULL"
)

then define a schedule like:

declare WSPR_SCHEDULE=(
   "00:00 KIWI_0,80 KIWI_0,40 KIWI_0,30 KIWI_0,20 KIWI_0,17 KIWI_0,15 KIWI_0,12 KIWI_0,10"
)


 


Re: Backdoor in KiwiSDR

KD2OM
 

Mine aren’t publicly listed but are available. I rarely see anyone else on it and I checked for incursion and found none. Plus I already had external admin console access closed. 
That said I did the update.

Steve KD2OM

.
 

On Jul 17, 2021, at 18:09, kk6pr <pointreyes@...> wrote:


" . . .Chinese IPs logged onto my KiwiSDR to monitor US military frequencies . . . The thought of the Chinese Communist Party adding and exploiting another backdoor entrance into my KiwiSDR is unsettling."

I'm more concerned about American fascists' access and use of my Kiwis.  My IP Blacklist is full of them - I don't care what frequencies they want to listen to.

On Sat, Jul 17, 2021 at 12:58 PM Carol KP4MD <kp4md@...> wrote:
I have no problem with John Seamons having access, but I was spooked and removed my KiwiSDR from the public Kiwi directory and DDNS service once I detected Chinese IPs pinging my router with port scanning attacks and several Chinese IPs logged onto my KiwiSDR to monitor US military frequencies.  The thought of the Chinese Communist Party adding and exploiting another backdoor entrance into my KiwiSDR is unsettling.


Re: Has anyone run auto-wspr and/or WD on a RaspSDR?

Rob Robinett
 
Edited

I forget who it was who reported that loading a new version of the kiwi code got their RaspberryPi working in autowspr and with WD.
Once autowspr works, disable it so WD can use those rx channels.

In the conf file you should need only to define the KIWI receiver as on localhost, e.g.:

declare RECEIVER_LIST=(
         "KIWI_0                    localhost:8073     AI6VN         CM87tj    NULL"
)

then define a schedule like:

declare WSPR_SCHEDULE=(
   "00:00 KIWI_0,80 KIWI_0,40 KIWI_0,30 KIWI_0,20 KIWI_0,17 KIWI_0,15 KIWI_0,12 KIWI_0,10"
)


Re: Has anyone run auto-wspr and/or WD on a RaspSDR?

Roland
 

Has this been resolved? Can somebody share the wsprdaemon.conf file for the RaspSDR?


Re: Backdoor in KiwiSDR

kk6pr
 

" . . .Chinese IPs logged onto my KiwiSDR to monitor US military frequencies . . . The thought of the Chinese Communist Party adding and exploiting another backdoor entrance into my KiwiSDR is unsettling."

I'm more concerned about American fascists' access and use of my Kiwis.  My IP Blacklist is full of them - I don't care what frequencies they want to listen to.


On Sat, Jul 17, 2021 at 12:58 PM Carol KP4MD <kp4md@...> wrote:
I have no problem with John Seamons having access, but I was spooked and removed my KiwiSDR from the public Kiwi directory and DDNS service once I detected Chinese IPs pinging my router with port scanning attacks and several Chinese IPs logged onto my KiwiSDR to monitor US military frequencies.  The thought of the Chinese Communist Party adding and exploiting another backdoor entrance into my KiwiSDR is unsettling.


Re: Backdoor in KiwiSDR

Carol KP4MD
 

I have no problem with John Seamons having access, but I was spooked and removed my KiwiSDR from the public Kiwi directory and DDNS service once I detected Chinese IPs pinging my router with port scanning attacks and several Chinese IPs logged onto my KiwiSDR to monitor US military frequencies.  The thought of the Chinese Communist Party adding and exploiting another backdoor entrance into my KiwiSDR is unsettling.


Re: Backdoor in KiwiSDR

Jim Lill
 

I agree and let's hope that John will continue to help us even if it means one on one access.  My recent ALE experiment was only possible becaus eJohn had that access to one of my Kiwi's for example

On 7/17/21 10:03 AM, Rob Robinett wrote:
I share Glenn and Stu's perspective on this issue.
Over the years John has demonstrated that he deserves our trust and appreciation for all of his work.
Hopefully all of this negative publicity doesn't drive him away from further work on the Kiwi.

On Fri, Jul 16, 2021 at 10:41 PM Stu C <stu@...> wrote:
As I understand it the access was permitted from only one IP address so
unless the miscreant managed to get hold of that base then launch
attacks the risk is small.
I too trust John and have made an SDR available to him via SSH many
times without a moments hesitation. One thing a generation focussed on
"correct" pronouns forgets is the morals and ethics of the older
generation bare little resemblance to (many) of those today. People who
lived most of their lives before the internet would generally not have
stolen music or avoided paying for goods (like software).

I had a Chinese NVR that I had somehow forgotten the password to,
support did not have a way for me to personally reset it at the hardware
but if I just gave it internet access they would do it for me in
minute... yeah no thanks. Half the complication of my home network
subnets, NAT and firewall is aimed at using off the shelf CCTV bits
without inviting a complete take over of my home network or being base
for further attacks. It is probably illegal to export an item from
country X without enabling a gov backdoor.

The fact that so many KiwiSDR's are still online makes me think that
most users understand this event and have decided the intention was good
if the inclusion does not suit today's world.

Has made me view the reporting of these events slightly differently,
drama sells, click bait etc.

Stu



On 17/07/2021 06:10, Glenn Elmore wrote:
>
>
> That John has had root access to KiwiSDRs has not been a secret for
> many years. To even a casual reader of the forum this has been
> obvious. Personally I have been aware of this and felt John was
> trustworthy and him having root access to a host on my private network
> and being able to help with troubleshooting had acceptable
> risk/benefit ratio.
>
> What seems new is simply the high level publicity of this fact.
> Perhaps I'm being naive but the only new risk I see here is that the
> announcement may trigger increased hacking attempts. Hopefully the
> changes in v .461 have/will mitigate these risks.
>
> Does anyone know of an instance where this 'vulnerability' has been
> exploited? Am I being silly with this perspective?
>
> Glenn n6gn
>
>
> On 2021-07-16 13:55, Carol KP4MD wrote:
>
>> "On Wednesday, users learned that for years, their devices had been
>> equipped with a backdoor that allowed the KiwiSDR creator—and
>> possibly others—to log in to the devices with administrative system
>> rights. The remote admin could then make configuration changes and
>> access data not just for the KiwiSDR but in many cases to the
>> Raspberry Pi <https://arstechnica.com/tag/raspberry-pi/>, BeagleBone
>> Black, or other computing devices the SDR hardware is connected to."
>>
>> The full story is at
>> https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/07/for-years-a-backdoor-in-popular-kiwisdr-product-gave-root-to-project-developer/
>> <https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/07/for-years-a-backdoor-in-popular-kiwisdr-product-gave-root-to-project-developer/>
>
>









--
Rob Robinett
AI6VN
mobile: +1 650 218 8896


Re: Backdoor in KiwiSDR

Rob Robinett
 

I share Glenn and Stu's perspective on this issue.
Over the years John has demonstrated that he deserves our trust and appreciation for all of his work.
Hopefully all of this negative publicity doesn't drive him away from further work on the Kiwi.

On Fri, Jul 16, 2021 at 10:41 PM Stu C <stu@...> wrote:
As I understand it the access was permitted from only one IP address so
unless the miscreant managed to get hold of that base then launch
attacks the risk is small.
I too trust John and have made an SDR available to him via SSH many
times without a moments hesitation. One thing a generation focussed on
"correct" pronouns forgets is the morals and ethics of the older
generation bare little resemblance to (many) of those today. People who
lived most of their lives before the internet would generally not have
stolen music or avoided paying for goods (like software).

I had a Chinese NVR that I had somehow forgotten the password to,
support did not have a way for me to personally reset it at the hardware
but if I just gave it internet access they would do it for me in
minute... yeah no thanks. Half the complication of my home network
subnets, NAT and firewall is aimed at using off the shelf CCTV bits
without inviting a complete take over of my home network or being base
for further attacks. It is probably illegal to export an item from
country X without enabling a gov backdoor.

The fact that so many KiwiSDR's are still online makes me think that
most users understand this event and have decided the intention was good
if the inclusion does not suit today's world.

Has made me view the reporting of these events slightly differently,
drama sells, click bait etc.

Stu



On 17/07/2021 06:10, Glenn Elmore wrote:
>
>
> That John has had root access to KiwiSDRs has not been a secret for
> many years. To even a casual reader of the forum this has been
> obvious. Personally I have been aware of this and felt John was
> trustworthy and him having root access to a host on my private network
> and being able to help with troubleshooting had acceptable
> risk/benefit ratio.
>
> What seems new is simply the high level publicity of this fact.
> Perhaps I'm being naive but the only new risk I see here is that the
> announcement may trigger increased hacking attempts. Hopefully the
> changes in v .461 have/will mitigate these risks.
>
> Does anyone know of an instance where this 'vulnerability' has been
> exploited? Am I being silly with this perspective?
>
> Glenn n6gn
>
>
> On 2021-07-16 13:55, Carol KP4MD wrote:
>
>> "On Wednesday, users learned that for years, their devices had been
>> equipped with a backdoor that allowed the KiwiSDR creator—and
>> possibly others—to log in to the devices with administrative system
>> rights. The remote admin could then make configuration changes and
>> access data not just for the KiwiSDR but in many cases to the
>> Raspberry Pi <https://arstechnica.com/tag/raspberry-pi/>, BeagleBone
>> Black, or other computing devices the SDR hardware is connected to."
>>
>> The full story is at
>> https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/07/for-years-a-backdoor-in-popular-kiwisdr-product-gave-root-to-project-developer/
>> <https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/07/for-years-a-backdoor-in-popular-kiwisdr-product-gave-root-to-project-developer/>
>
>









--
Rob Robinett
AI6VN
mobile: +1 650 218 8896


Re: Backdoor in KiwiSDR

Stu C
 

As I understand it the access was permitted from only one IP address so unless the miscreant managed to get hold of that base then launch attacks the risk is small.
I too trust John and have made an SDR available to him via SSH many times without a moments hesitation. One thing a generation focussed on "correct" pronouns forgets is the morals and ethics of the older generation bare little resemblance to (many) of those today. People who lived most of their lives before the internet would generally not have stolen music or avoided paying for goods (like software).

I had a Chinese NVR that I had somehow forgotten the password to, support did not have a way for me to personally reset it at the hardware but if I just gave it internet access they would do it for me in minute... yeah no thanks. Half the complication of my home network subnets, NAT and firewall is aimed at using off the shelf CCTV bits without inviting a complete take over of my home network or being base for further attacks. It is probably illegal to export an item from country X without enabling a gov backdoor.

The fact that so many KiwiSDR's are still online makes me think that most users understand this event and have decided the intention was good if the inclusion does not suit today's world.

Has made me view the reporting of these events slightly differently, drama sells, click bait etc.

Stu

On 17/07/2021 06:10, Glenn Elmore wrote:


That John has had root access to KiwiSDRs has not been a secret for many years. To even a casual reader of the forum this has been obvious. Personally I have been aware of this and felt John was trustworthy and him having root access to a host on my private network and being able to help with troubleshooting had acceptable risk/benefit ratio.

What seems new is simply the high level publicity of this fact. Perhaps I'm being naive but the only new risk I see here is that the announcement may trigger increased hacking attempts. Hopefully the changes in v .461 have/will mitigate these risks.

Does anyone know of an instance where this 'vulnerability' has been exploited? Am I being silly with this perspective?

Glenn n6gn


On 2021-07-16 13:55, Carol KP4MD wrote:

"On Wednesday, users learned that for years, their devices had been equipped with a backdoor that allowed the KiwiSDR creator—and possibly others—to log in to the devices with administrative system rights. The remote admin could then make configuration changes and access data not just for the KiwiSDR but in many cases to the Raspberry Pi <https://arstechnica.com/tag/raspberry-pi/>, BeagleBone Black, or other computing devices the SDR hardware is connected to."

The full story is at https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/07/for-years-a-backdoor-in-popular-kiwisdr-product-gave-root-to-project-developer/ <https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/07/for-years-a-backdoor-in-popular-kiwisdr-product-gave-root-to-project-developer/>


Re: Backdoor in KiwiSDR

Glenn Elmore
 


 

That John has had root access to KiwiSDRs has not been a secret for many years. To even a casual reader of the forum this has been obvious. Personally I have been aware of this and felt John was trustworthy and him having root access to a host on my private network and being able to help with troubleshooting had acceptable risk/benefit ratio.  

What seems new is simply the high level publicity of this fact. Perhaps I'm being naive but the only new risk I see here is that the announcement may trigger increased hacking attempts.  Hopefully the changes in v .461 have/will mitigate these risks.  

Does anyone know of an instance where this 'vulnerability' has been exploited? Am I being silly with this perspective?

Glenn n6gn


On 2021-07-16 13:55, Carol KP4MD wrote:

"On Wednesday, users learned that for years, their devices had been equipped with a backdoor that allowed the KiwiSDR creator—and possibly others—to log in to the devices with administrative system rights. The remote admin could then make configuration changes and access data not just for the KiwiSDR but in many cases to the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone Black, or other computing devices the SDR hardware is connected to." 

The full story is at https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/07/for-years-a-backdoor-in-popular-kiwisdr-product-gave-root-to-project-developer/


Backdoor in KiwiSDR

Carol KP4MD
 

"On Wednesday, users learned that for years, their devices had been equipped with a backdoor that allowed the KiwiSDR creator—and possibly others—to log in to the devices with administrative system rights. The remote admin could then make configuration changes and access data not just for the KiwiSDR but in many cases to the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone Black, or other computing devices the SDR hardware is connected to." 

The full story is at https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/07/for-years-a-backdoor-in-popular-kiwisdr-product-gave-root-to-project-developer/

141 - 160 of 508