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aerial id please

 

Hello,
Can anyone tell me which radio set used the Aerial Dipole No.9 Mk1/1?
Regards,
Ian Cooper

Chris_Suslowicz
 

Ian Cooper wrote:

Hello,
Can anyone tell me which radio set used the Aerial Dipole No.9 Mk1/1?
Wireless Set No. 12HP and Wireless Set No.53.

The centre junction has a single pin Niphan connector and co-ax cables were supplied in (I think) 50-ft lengths to connect the dipole to a matching socket on the set - I suspect the resulting feeder was sufficiently heavy to require a mast to support it!

No.9 is 92-ft long, 9A is 53-ft and 9B is 210-ft, they would be shortened to suit the frequency in use by moving the chain link insulators inwards and winding the extra wire around the used pat of the aerial (rather than cutting it). An aerial length chart and long tape measure was part of the set kit.

The "/1" on the end of the designation just means "tropicalised" - i.e. everything is rotproofed.

Chris. (G8KGS)

 

Thanks Chris.  The antenna was in with a load of Larkspur era equipment and though I thought it may belong to the era, I couldn't relate it to any sets that I have.
Regards,
Ian Cooper

Chris_Suslowicz
 

Ian Cooper wrote:

Thanks Chris. The antenna was in with a load of Larkspur era equipment and though I thought it may belong to the era, I couldn't relate it to any sets that I have.
I don't think it was used with the D11 or D13, but could be wrong - they were using the Burndept sockets rather than Niphan (or Pattern 104 fine thread for some of the aerial connections - set to ATU, etc.), and Niphans are just Too Bloody Heavy. The "Wire, Electric, R4" was still used though, probably with the specialised transformers and terminating resistors for making up rhombic and sloping vee aerials, not sure about dipoles.

People who actually used the kit in anger will be able to fill in the details. (Waves at G8MOB and others.) :-)>

Best regards,
Chris. (G8KGS)
Junior Password Gnome.

Michael O'Beirne
 

Hi Chris

I may be able to help.

I Googled Niphan sockets and they seem to resemble old fashioned bright metal power sockets found on caravans and trailers. I may have the wrong Niphan!

Inside the D11 wagons, the antenna connections from the transmitter to the dummy load and VSWR meter were the coarse thread Plessey type coaxial connectors. The external socket(s) on the side of the vehicle for connecting the coax for a dipole was the standard Burndept type. The dipole centre piece was also a Burndept.

The antenna wire was normal R4 copper.

Marconi provided TX and RX baluns for a 75 coax to 600ohm open wire feeder using R4 for use with Vs and rhombics for long haul links but we had no use for them. Besides, the huge real estate needed for a rhombic was strictly for a home station or specialist units with lots of infantry for protection.

I have in storage a TX balun - a massive thing the size and shape of a chamber pot with two long feed through insulator "horns" for the open feeder. I cannot recall the coax socket but it was bigger than a Burndept.

73s
Michael
G8MOB

-----Original Message-----
From: Chris_Suslowicz
Sent: Monday, November 11, 2019 12:09 AM
To: wireless-set-no19@groups.io
Subject: Re: [wireless-set-no19] aerial id please

Ian Cooper wrote:

Thanks Chris. The antenna was in with a load of Larkspur era equipment and though I thought it may belong to the era, I couldn't relate it to any sets that I have.
I don't think it was used with the D11 or D13, but could be wrong - they were using the Burndept sockets rather than Niphan (or Pattern 104 fine thread for some of the aerial connections - set to ATU, etc.), and Niphans are just Too Bloody Heavy. The "Wire, Electric, R4" was still used though, probably with the specialised transformers and terminating resistors for making up rhombic and sloping vee aerials, not sure about dipoles.

People who actually used the kit in anger will be able to fill in the details. (Waves at G8MOB and others.) :-)>

Best regards,
Chris. (G8KGS)
Junior Password Gnome.

Chris_Suslowicz
 

Michael (G8MOB) wrote:

Hi Chris

I may be able to help.

I Googled Niphan sockets and they seem to resemble old fashioned bright metal power sockets found on caravans and trailers. I may have the wrong Niphan!
No, those are the right ones, as used on Signals batteries during WW2 and afterwards, but with a single central pin instead of two dissimilar ones for LT supplies.


Inside the D11 wagons, the antenna connections from the transmitter to the dummy load and VSWR meter were the coarse thread Plessey type coaxial connectors.
I thought they were the fine thread aluminium alloy type? Certainly I found a couple at Beltring for someone and they were well pleased with the purchase.

The external socket(s) on the side of the vehicle for connecting the coax for a dipole was the standard Burndept type. The dipole centre piece was also a Burndept.

The antenna wire was normal R4 copper.

Marconi provided TX and RX baluns for a 75 coax to 600ohm open wire feeder using R4 for use with Vs and rhombics for long haul links but we had no use for them. Besides, the huge real estate needed for a rhombic was strictly for a home station or specialist units with lots of infantry for protection.

I have in storage a TX balun - a massive thing the size and shape of a chamber pot with two long feed through insulator "horns" for the open feeder. I cannot recall the coax socket but it was bigger than a Burndept.
That may be for the "Antenna Group, Sloping Vee", or possibly for something considerably more potent than a "D" series transmitter. (Marconi SWB or T E10, etc.)

Best regards,
Chris. (G8KGS)

 

Chris,
I loocked in WftW and checked the W.S. 53.  It is part of the horizontal dipole aerial and feeder assembly.  The dipole aerial is made to length depending on which frequency is used.  The No. 9 is the 92 foot aerial.
Thanks again.
Ian (VA6SSV)

Michael O'Beirne
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Chris_Suslowicz
Sent: Monday, November 11, 2019 10:59 PM
To: wireless-set-no19@groups.io
Subject: Re: [wireless-set-no19] aerial id please

Michael (G8MOB) wrote:

I have in storage a TX balun - a massive thing the size and shape of a chamber pot with two long feed through insulator "horns" for the open feeder. I cannot recall the coax socket but it was bigger than a Burndept.
That may be for the "Antenna Group, Sloping Vee", or possibly for something considerably more potent than a "D" series transmitter. (Marconi SWB or T E10, etc.)

Best regards,
Chris. (G8KGS)

-The big chamber pot-shaped balun was more for the D13 with 500 watts output on FSK. Vastly overrated and typical Marconi. Even the receive balun is large and robust.

At Blandford Camp in the 1970s and 80s they had big lattice masts supporting various wire wide-band aerials. These were fed by open wire feeder terminated at these pot baluns mounted on a steel framework well out of arm's reach for safety and then coax cable to the transmitter building nearby. I think there were 5 or 6 baluns.

Try to get hold of the D13 operator's manual. There should be a description of these baluns and the aerials.

73s
Michael
G8MOB