Topics

Wave Stick


Louise Yale
 

Anyone use one of these?

Any recommendations on brand? length??

See Handwoven Nov/Dec 2020 page 20-22 for details.

Louise in NorCal


Sally O
 
Edited

I bought the Ashford wavy stick shuttle at Midwest Weavers last summer (2019) after first seeing it at Convergence Reno in 2018, and then again at Rhinebeck last fall, where it was being elegantly demonstrated by a vendor (photo attached).

I believe the variegated yarn used at Rhinebeck is also an Ashford product, and I think length of each color was approximately 18". I have heard that there is a different product that can be used when beginning weaving with this wavy stick shuttle to secure the waves - so the weft doesn't slip along the warps. (Packing those spots at the beginning & end probably also works.)

I hope someone else recalls what that securing yarn or product is, or if there is an alternative.



Note that this particular product has two sides, one set of waves is tighter than the other side.


Igor Raven
 

Very intriguing piece of work.

The combination of variegated yarn and an uneven or wavy fell line worked very well together. Something will have to try now. Thank you for sharing.


On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 9:23 AM Sally O <s.orgren@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

I bought the Ashford wavy stick shuttle at Midwest Weavers last summer (2019) after first seeing it at Convergence Reno in 2018, and then again at Rhinebeck last fall, where it was being elegantly demonstrated by a vendor (photo attached).

I believe the variegated yarn used at Rhinebeck is also an Ashford product, and I think length of each color was approximately 18". I have heard that there is a different product that can be used when beginning weaving with this wavy stick shuttle to secure the waves - so the weft doesn't slip along the warps. (Packing those spots at the beginning & end probably also works.)

I hope someone else recalls what that securing yarn or product is, or if there is an alternative.




Note that this particular product as two sides, one set of waves is tighter than when using the other side.


Margaret Welch
 

Could you cut a cardboard complement to sit in the bottom until you were ready to cut off?  And hemstitch the beginning, of course.    Meg Welch

On Nov 2, 2020, at 12:21 PM, Sally O <s.orgren@...> wrote:

alternative.


kathyo
 

That’s really cool looking... I think it would make great scarves and holiday table runners and banners! I never thought much about the wave beaters before, but you’ve changed my mind.

I think the cardboard cut to match sounds like a good idea ... and hemstitching...

kathyo


Louise Yale
 

The wave stick has not arrived yet but I am thinking of yarns with a bit
of texture and traction in the warp and possibly the weft.
No smooth yarns.

Thanks to The Woolery for taking my order and shipping so promptly.

Louise in NorCal

--------

That’s really cool looking... I think it would make great scarves and
holiday table runners and banners! I never thought much about the wave
beaters before, but you’ve changed my mind.

I think the cardboard cut to match sounds like a good idea ... and
hemstitching...

kathyo







Ann Tomes
 

See the article in the latest issue of Handwoven, thin perle cotton works really well.  

On Monday, November 2, 2020, 2:39:07 PM EST, Louise Yale via groups.io <cafeina@...> wrote:


The wave stick has not arrived yet but I am thinking of yarns with a bit
of texture and traction in the warp and possibly the weft.
No smooth yarns.

Thanks to The Woolery for taking my order and shipping so promptly.

Louise in NorCal

--------

> That’s really cool looking... I think it would make great scarves and
> holiday table runners and banners! I never thought much about the wave
> beaters before, but you’ve changed my mind.
>
> I think the cardboard cut to match sounds like a good idea ... and
> hemstitching...
>
> kathyo
>
>
>
>
>
>
>







Sally O
 

I received a few PM's about this topic (thanks Margaret & Penny) that activated a few dormant neurons!

Check out Handwoven Issue #169, March/April 2014, page 64, for an article by Suzi Ballenger, "Mizugoromo-Inspired Cloth with a Supplemental Beater." In the article she addresses how the threads are kept from migrating along with some historical background, and the tool she invented to reproduce the technique on her own loom.

Next, I went to Suzi's website (RealFibers.com) and I see that she still sells her Supplemental Beater.

So, now I am looking forward to seeing some woven samples!


Louise Yale
 

Thanks to Sally O and everyone for your comments re: wave sticks.

Mine is still somewhere between KY and NorCal.

I am clearing a loom.

Louise

I received a few PM's about this topic (thanks Margaret & Penny) that
activated a few dormant neurons!

Check out Handwoven Issue #169, March/April 2014, page 64, for an article
by Suzi Ballenger, "Mizugoromo-Inspired Cloth with a Supplemental Beater."
In the article she addresses how the threads are kept from migrating along
with some historical background, and the tool she invented to reproduce
the technique on her own loom.

Next, I went to Suzi's website (RealFibers.com) and I see that she still
sells her Supplemental Beater.

So, now I am looking forward to seeing some woven samples!






Mary Underwood
 

I have Japanese fabric (purchased at my first Convergence — 2000 in Cincinnati) from Kasurki. It is woven by a Japanese master weaver and national treasure. His ondulé ‘wave stick’ was his fingernails, which were filed in such a way that he created small undulating patterns in very fine silk. The weaving takes your breath away. Assuming anyone has fingernails left after this week, something interesting to try….

Mary Underwood
Ann Arbor, MI