Rabbit hole


Fran Osten
 

I seem to have gotten into a real rabbit hole looking at information from various causes we support.  But along with the Cranbrook article I found the following:  Ashoka led me to Nicole Rycroft and her organization, Canopy, which finds alternatives to deforestation by using what is often seen as landfill but specifically mentioning woven fiber. Much of it was looking at alternatives for packaging (important in our Amazon world but a yawn) and listing hemp as a viable proto-fiber (this is new???)  Part of her website listed Circ, however.  An organization that aims to recycle fabric fiber for reuse (clothing has become a real pollution/landfill problem in the past 20 years as people look to "fast fashion" and trash last year’s outfits they just had to have)….. so this might be of interest to some of you….https://circ.earth/our-purpose/

Fran Osten
Goose Cove Looms


Sara von Tresckow
 

Fran,
Recycling clothing fiber is also nothing new. We lived in Germany from 1971
to 1990 - when we had textiles that were no longer usable and also not good
enough for the thrift shops, there were regular "Lumpensammlungen" from the
Red Cross and other organizations. They collected rags for use in producing
paper and other materials that needed fibers as a base ingredient.
It was a major disappointment when we came back to Wisconsin that I have no
outlet for textiles filled with holes yet containing useful fibers.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


Fran Osten
 

We in the US are such a throw away culture. The Europeans are so much more forward thinking on many fronts.

Fran

On Jan 5, 2022, at 10:55 AM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@woolgatherers.com> wrote:

Fran,
Recycling clothing fiber is also nothing new. We lived in Germany from 1971
to 1990 - when we had textiles that were no longer usable and also not good
enough for the thrift shops, there were regular "Lumpensammlungen" from the
Red Cross and other organizations. They collected rags for use in producing
paper and other materials that needed fibers as a base ingredient.
It was a major disappointment when we came back to Wisconsin that I have no
outlet for textiles filled with holes yet containing useful fibers.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs







Joe P
 

Hi Everyone 

I have been weaving with rag for 42 years, When I started to weave rag rugs I was looked at as a (recycler), then some years passed and I was part of (living green), today I am (upscaling). There is a large market for rag in Wisconsion.  I can buy bails of used clothing at 500 pounds each of any kind of fabric I would like. The rag is all sorted to fiber Wool cotton poly cotton silk. I just have to make a phone call in the morning and pick up in the afternoon if they have the bails of fabric type I want. in stock. The only problem is a lot of kid's size clothing. They do not bail to size of clothing in the bail kids or adults, Nothing is perfect but doable. 

Keep weaving 
Joe Bear in WI IU.S.A.       


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 5, 2022 9:55 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Rabbit hole
 
Fran,
Recycling clothing fiber is also nothing new. We lived in Germany from 1971
to 1990 - when we had textiles that were no longer usable and also not good
enough for the thrift shops, there were regular "Lumpensammlungen" from the
Red Cross and other organizations. They collected rags for use in producing
paper and other materials that needed fibers as a base ingredient.
It was a major disappointment when we came back to Wisconsin that I have no
outlet for textiles filled with holes yet containing useful fibers.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs








Sara von Tresckow
 

Joe,
Where are these bales collected? I have never, as a private person, received
notification of a rag collection by any organization. I used to keep castoff
textiles in a large sack and wait for the next pickup, but in the last 31
years, here in Fond du Lac, I have never had any opportunity.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


margcoe
 

“Shoddy cloth” was woven from recycled wool in 1813 in Bartley, Yorkshire. Through the 1950’s the “rag and bone” man, with horse and cart collected discarded clothing from households. Some children followed collecting the horse manure, whereas my sister and I got into a lot of trouble selling our mum’s rags for goldfish.

The industry is being revitalized in Dewsbury, Yorkshire by the “iinouiio” company. https://futurefashionfactory.org/iinouiio-brings-shoddy-production-back-to-yorkshire/

  • Marg
  • (=^ ◡ ^=)
  • coeweaves.com
    e-weave-online.thinkific.com


    Joe P
     

    Seara 

    When you have unwanted clothing, you donate it to a second hand store. The second hand store sells the unusable clouting to the ragger, for money. Most of the larger second stores have a baling press the press all unwanted goes in the store bails When the ragger buys the bails from the second hand store, they the ragger opens the store bails and sorts to the different type of fabric and re-bails it to sell it back to the industry. 100% cotton is then made in to an 80/20 blend and the 100% wool is them made in to an 80/20 wool and silk blend. In reading about all of the un wanted clothing is going in to landfills is silly rag is big business if a second hand store does not have a lot of rag to sell to the ragger the second hand store has to pay the ragger to haul it off in this case the ragger makes money on the two ends. Sera if a dollar can be made someone has got it. The only clothing that goes into the landfills is the clothing we put in the trash carts it should be put in the recycling cart, then it gets all pulled back out at the recycling sorting centers, and then sold to the raggers. This is not just done with rag it is done with everything. Sera you have rag you don't want put it in your recycling cart it will end up where you want it to go, not in to a land fill. Citys make a lot of money off of our unwanted things. or they would never build recycling centers for millions of dollars.

    Keep Weaving 
    Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 

        



      


    From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...>
    Sent: Wednesday, January 5, 2022 11:08 AM
    To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
    Subject: Re: [weavetech] Rabbit hole
     
    Joe,
    Where are these bales collected? I have never, as a private person, received
    notification of a rag collection by any organization. I used to keep castoff
    textiles in a large sack and wait for the next pickup, but in the last 31
    years, here in Fond du Lac, I have never had any opportunity.

    Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
    sarav@...
    Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
    http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
    Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
    needs








    Fran Osten
     

    In our part of Massachusetts you can’t recycle fabric in your bin.  The second hand store I took old fabric to was also very picky. Example bed sheets with tired elastic were not taken.

    On Wed, Jan 5, 2022 at 1:14 PM Joe P <rugsbyjoe@...> wrote:
    Seara 

    When you have unwanted clothing, you donate it to a second hand store. The second hand store sells the unusable clouting to the ragger, for money. Most of the larger second stores have a baling press the press all unwanted goes in the store bails When the ragger buys the bails from the second hand store, they the ragger opens the store bails and sorts to the different type of fabric and re-bails it to sell it back to the industry. 100% cotton is then made in to an 80/20 blend and the 100% wool is them made in to an 80/20 wool and silk blend. In reading about all of the un wanted clothing is going in to landfills is silly rag is big business if a second hand store does not have a lot of rag to sell to the ragger the second hand store has to pay the ragger to haul it off in this case the ragger makes money on the two ends. Sera if a dollar can be made someone has got it. The only clothing that goes into the landfills is the clothing we put in the trash carts it should be put in the recycling cart, then it gets all pulled back out at the recycling sorting centers, and then sold to the raggers. This is not just done with rag it is done with everything. Sera you have rag you don't want put it in your recycling cart it will end up where you want it to go, not in to a land fill. Citys make a lot of money off of our unwanted things. or they would never build recycling centers for millions of dollars.

    Keep Weaving 
    Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 

        



      

    From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...>
    Sent: Wednesday, January 5, 2022 11:08 AM
    To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
    Subject: Re: [weavetech] Rabbit hole
     
    Joe,
    Where are these bales collected? I have never, as a private person, received
    notification of a rag collection by any organization. I used to keep castoff
    textiles in a large sack and wait for the next pickup, but in the last 31
    years, here in Fond du Lac, I have never had any opportunity.

    Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
    sarav@...
    Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
    http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
    Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
    needs








    Eileen Thompson
     

    Marg - you really stirred up some memories!    We lived in Nelson, Lancashire during the war and there the Rag Bone man would come trotting down the street in   his little cart and pony shouting Rag bo-o-o-ne!   Before giving clothes to him, my mother would carefully remove all buttons, buckles and anything else useful - no zippers in those days - and these would go into her button box - a tin box of treasures I loved to play with.    Our Rag Bone man did not give away goldfish though - only white stone blocks to mark the edges of steps with.

    Here now in Texas I get very frustrated about what to do with old clothes.   Lots of places collect "gently used" clothing, but it seems no one wants rags.
    Eileen in Texas


    Ian Bowers
     

    Front door step cleaning stone – known as Donkey Stone.  Wet and rub on the edge.  Only the street sluts left their step looking a mess. 

     

    Best regards

     

    Ian Bowers (Dr)

    Managing Director

     

    www.georgeweil.com

    GEORGE WEIL & SONS LTD, Old Portsmouth Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 1LZ

    tel: 0 (+44) 1483 565800
    fax: 0 (+44) 1483 565807

    George Weil & Sons is a limited company registered in England and Wales.
    Registered number 00321890. Registered office: Peasmarsh, Guildford, GU3 1LZ 

    Follow George Weil: visit Twitter.comvisit Facebook.comsee our Blog
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    From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Eileen Thompson via groups.io
    Sent: 06 January 2022 15:22
    To: weavetech@groups.io
    Subject: Re: [weavetech] Rabbit hole

     

    Marg - you really stirred up some memories!    We lived in Nelson, Lancashire during the war and there the Rag Bone man would come trotting down the street in   his little cart and pony shouting Rag bo-o-o-ne!   Before giving clothes to him, my mother would carefully remove all buttons, buckles and anything else useful - no zippers in those days - and these would go into her button box - a tin box of treasures I loved to play with.    Our Rag Bone man did not give away goldfish though - only white stone blocks to mark the edges of steps with.

     

    Here now in Texas I get very frustrated about what to do with old clothes.   Lots of places collect "gently used" clothing, but it seems no one wants rags.

    Eileen in Texas


    Cheryl Hudnall
     

    I am pretty positive that Salvation Army in the US has a nationwide program that they turn old clothing into rags or they sell the rags to a company who recycles them. Inquire at your neighborhood SA, but this is common place in TN area.

    Cheryl (who has enjoyed this string of conversation)


    spinnercat2001
     

    Our community in Michigan contacts with https://simplerecycling.com/
    In November I had them pick up several contractor bags with clothing and old bedding that I had been hanging onto because the service was suspended during early covid measures.  They do the sorting of what might be for resale and what can be recycled as rags/fiber.

    Valerie M.


    Sara von Tresckow
     

    The service in MI is what I was referring to - where we live, SA and
    Goodwill and the like plead with people to keep "rage" out of the bins -
    they get way too much non-resellable clothing as it is.

    Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
    sarav@woolgatherers.com
    Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
    http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
    Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
    needs


    Joe P
     

    Hi Everyone 

    In the start of the pandemic and people stayed home, People cleaned house, and boxed and bagged up everything they did not want and took it to the second hand shops to donate. Now keep in mind what was just junk that belongs in a recycling center, the owners thought the junk still had a resale value, and donated it to the secondhand stores. The second hand stores went to the news media and a report was shown on the news asking people to please stop donating junk and in the news report, a video showed what had no resale value. It was stated in the news report the cost the second hand stores had to pay to have all of the junk hulled away and they were going broke more or less at that time, all stores were closed for a good while and second hand stores also in this mix at the star of the pandemic and second hand stores had no income to have all the junk hulled away. 

    There is more to this story 

    I too did some cleaning out of unwanted things just junk I loaded it up to take to the recycling center. The line went for blocks long I do mean blocks long. It took me just under 2 hours to get to the gate to get in to the recycling center I could not dive in till one car drove out more time. any ways, when people saw the long lines at the recycling center. They did not want to sit in long lines and took junk to the second hand stores to get rid of junk quick. I paid my dues that day. The rest of the junk I had home. I put a little in the recycling cart every two weeks till it was gone. 

    The second hand stores did not only plead people to stop bring un saleable clothing smelling of mold but unsaleable anything that was just junk. 

    Keep Weaving 
    Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 

      
         


    From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...>
    Sent: Thursday, January 6, 2022 10:37 AM
    To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
    Subject: Re: [weavetech] Rabbit hole
     
    The service in MI is what I was referring to - where we live, SA and
    Goodwill and the like plead with people to keep "rage" out of the bins -
    they get way too much non-resellable clothing as it is.

    Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
    sarav@...
    Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
    http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
    Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
    needs








    mmarker570
     

    Hi all,
    This link, (I hope I'm doing it correctly) is out of yesterday's Portland "Oregonian."  Nicole, one of the founders of The Renewal Workshop, is my daughter-in-law, and I am so pleased that her company is thriving. 
    You cannot believe the amount of clothing, returned goods, they receive from the companies with whom they contract. They try to recycle everything. It's a fantastic undertaking.


    https://www.oregonlive.com/business/2022/01/big-fashion-companies-send-their-production-discards-to-cascade-locks-for-a-chance-a-new-life.html

    M Marker


    Penny Lacroix
     

    I've been reading Unraveled: The Life and Death of a Garment by Maxine Bedat and highly recommend it to those of you who are interested in the issues addressed in this thread. It's made me change my buying and usage patterns. 


    This is from the website:

    A groundbreaking chronicle of the birth–and death–of a pair of jeans, that exposes the fractures in our global supply chains, and our relationships to each other, ourselves, and the planet.

    Take a look at your favorite pair of jeans. Maybe you bought them on Amazon or the Gap; maybe the tag says “Made in Bangladesh” or “Made in Sri Lanka.” But do you know where they really came from, how many thousands of miles they crossed, or the number of hands who picked, spun, wove, dyed, packaged, shipped, and sold them to get to you? The fashion industry operates with radical opacity, and it’s only getting worse to disguise countless environmental and labor abuses. It epitomizes the ravages inherent in the global economy, and all in the name of ensuring that we keep buying more while thinking less about its real cost.

    In Unraveled, entrepreneur, researcher, and advocate Maxine Bédat follows the life of an American icon–a pair of jeans–to reveal what really happens to give us our clothes. We visit a Texas cotton farm figuring out how to thrive without relying on fertilizers that poison the earth. Inside dyeing and weaving factories in China, where chemicals that are banned in the West slosh on factory floors and drain into waterways used to irrigate local family farms. Sewing floors in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka are crammed with women working for illegally low wages to produce garments as efficiently as machines. Back in America, our jeans get stowed, picked, and shipped out by Amazon warehouse workers pressed to be as quick as the robots primed to replace them. Finally, those jeans we had to have get sent to landfills–or, if they’ve been “donated,” shipped back around the world to Africa, where they’re sold for pennies in secondhand markets or buried and burned in mountains of garbage.

    A sprawling, deeply researched, and provocative tour-de-force, Unraveled is not just the story of a pair of pants, but also the story of our global economy and our role in it. Told with piercing insight and unprecedented reporting, Unraveled challenges us to use our relationship with our jeans–and all that we wear–to reclaim our central role as citizens to refashion a society in which all people can thrive and preserve the planet for generations to come.

    Best,
    Penny

    On Thu, Jan 6, 2022 at 4:36 PM mmarker570 via groups.io <mcm570=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
    Hi all,
    This link, (I hope I'm doing it correctly) is out of yesterday's Portland "Oregonian."  Nicole, one of the founders of The Renewal Workshop, is my daughter-in-law, and I am so pleased that her company is thriving. 
    You cannot believe the amount of clothing, returned goods, they receive from the companies with whom they contract. They try to recycle everything. It's a fantastic undertaking.


    https://www.oregonlive.com/business/2022/01/big-fashion-companies-send-their-production-discards-to-cascade-locks-for-a-chance-a-new-life.html

    M Marker