Topics

Peeling a sheep


sallyeyring
 

I heard about drugs that they give sheep to make their wool come off more easily.  This is a video about an injectable enzyme without any information.  But the video that shows them "peeling" a sheep is amazing!  It also seems like it would be easier on the sheep - with no danger of cuts.  I hope the enzyme isn't a problem in other ways.  And I wonder about the residue in the sheep's body.   Old sheep are probably used for pet food when then die, so I wonder about that too.   Do enzymes break down?  Or are we going to have bald pets?

-Sally Eyring


https://www.reddit.com/r/Damnthatsinteresting/comments/jti5q5/an_injectable_enzyme_developed_by_a_japanese/


Sherri Coffey
 

My go-to answer is not to use anything that goes into the body. However, I know nothing about this sheep. I know there's a chance of cuts, but with a good shearer, there's less likely to be a problem.

On Wed, Nov 18, 2020 at 10:26 AM sallyeyring <sally_eyring@...> wrote:
I heard about drugs that they give sheep to make their wool come off more easily.  This is a video about an injectable enzyme without any information.  But the video that shows them "peeling" a sheep is amazing!  It also seems like it would be easier on the sheep - with no danger of cuts.  I hope the enzyme isn't a problem in other ways.  And I wonder about the residue in the sheep's body.   Old sheep are probably used for pet food when then die, so I wonder about that too.   Do enzymes break down?  Or are we going to have bald pets?

-Sally Eyring


https://www.reddit.com/r/Damnthatsinteresting/comments/jti5q5/an_injectable_enzyme_developed_by_a_japanese/


Sherri Coffey
 

Should've said I know nothing about this enzyme (not sheep) or other enzymes.

On Wed, Nov 18, 2020 at 11:01 AM Sherri Coffey via groups.io <sherri.w.coffey=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
My go-to answer is not to use anything that goes into the body. However, I know nothing about this sheep. I know there's a chance of cuts, but with a good shearer, there's less likely to be a problem.

On Wed, Nov 18, 2020 at 10:26 AM sallyeyring <sally_eyring@...> wrote:
I heard about drugs that they give sheep to make their wool come off more easily.  This is a video about an injectable enzyme without any information.  But the video that shows them "peeling" a sheep is amazing!  It also seems like it would be easier on the sheep - with no danger of cuts.  I hope the enzyme isn't a problem in other ways.  And I wonder about the residue in the sheep's body.   Old sheep are probably used for pet food when then die, so I wonder about that too.   Do enzymes break down?  Or are we going to have bald pets?

-Sally Eyring


https://www.reddit.com/r/Damnthatsinteresting/comments/jti5q5/an_injectable_enzyme_developed_by_a_japanese/


Brenda Stultz
 

I don’t know about the process to “peel” them but I can tell you we ate our old sheep - Morton is delicious and leaner than lamb which is a young one.

Brenda

On Wed, Nov 18, 2020 at 10:26 AM sallyeyring <sally_eyring@...> wrote:
I heard about drugs that they give sheep to make their wool come off more easily.  This is a video about an injectable enzyme without any information.  But the video that shows them "peeling" a sheep is amazing!  It also seems like it would be easier on the sheep - with no danger of cuts.  I hope the enzyme isn't a problem in other ways.  And I wonder about the residue in the sheep's body.   Old sheep are probably used for pet food when then die, so I wonder about that too.   Do enzymes break down?  Or are we going to have bald pets?

-Sally Eyring


https://www.reddit.com/r/Damnthatsinteresting/comments/jti5q5/an_injectable_enzyme_developed_by_a_japanese/


Sara von Tresckow
 

There are some breeds where "rooing" or plucking in the Spring is part of
the genetics, so the idea is not that farfetched. It does warrant a close
look at the substance injected for possible contamination of a meat source.
For ewes that give milk, I would be quite cautious.
Cuts from shearing are NOT a major problem(Former sheep breeder here) and a
little "blue spray" after shearing takes care of them. Where the major
difference would come in is in places where quality shearers (think second
cuts) are in short supply. A small breeder could "peel" their own sheep and
send the wool to market with better quality than shearing it improperly and
rendering the wool to the scrap heap or compost bin.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs