Topics

Looms with Low Profile


Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

(Come to think of it, are there low profile CM or CB looms????)
I've only heard of one low profile CM loom and but can't remember the brand.
It used pulleys to raise & sink shafts.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


jaakaa@...
 

No disloyalty to AVL but the low profile of the megado
>will not intrude on the wonderful panoramic view we have on 2 sides
>of this medium-large sized LR- DR.

*******************

Barbara - or anyone? - could you give us more information about this
loom? It's a name I'm not at all familiar with. I, too, am concerned
about the "view obstruction". I went to great lengths when we built
our house, to have a view into the refuge woods beyond, from my
studio. At this point, my dear old Norwood jack loom doesn't
interfere, but eventually, I plan to purchase another (lusting for the
"walking" Rio Grande Cadillac Loom, am I) but am resisting the high
profile designs. To clarify: it's not a dobby, or many shafts I would
need - 8, in my case, but information/experience from others about
resources for low profile looms would be greatly appreciated.
(Come to think of it, are there low profile CM or CB looms????)

Thanks,
Kris in Alaska


Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

could you give us more information about this
loom? <snip> To clarify: it's not a dobby, or many shafts I would
need - 8, in my case, but information/experience from others about
resources for low profile looms would be greatly appreciated.
The Megado is a 32-shaft computer-aided loom manufactured by Louet. If you're not interested in lots of shafts or CAW, this loom isn't for you. And tho the profile is certainly lower than a full-frame AVL, I don't find the Megado an especially low profile. About as high as a Schacht high-castle floor loom, I'd say.

Ruth
whose internet provider (ComCast) has chosen today to be cranky. We're getting to your digest/indiv msg switches as fast as we can, but ComCast has thrown its sabot into the works--an appropiately weaverly reference.


Laura MacCary <lmaccary@...>
 

In my opinion, the big problem with the low-profile loom design is that you
are pretty much forced to use a rising-shed jack mechanism. And one problem
with this mechanism is the difficulty of lifting many shafts. Some looms are
easier to treadle than others, because the designer paid attention to
leverage, but in general they're harder to treadle and can have fussier
(smaller or less clean) sheds than CB or CM looms. I understand that they
can also have problems with certain unbalanced weave structures. I hear CB
or CM looms can sometimes be better for these because the rising/falling
tension on the threads is equal, so the difference in take-up is minimized.

The 2 big advantages of the rising-shed jack looms are the low profile and
the ability to press more than one treadle at a time (difficult on a CM loom
unless you use a special tie-up) and get a large shed (difficult on a CB
when pressing multiple treadles unless you have a shed regulator).

These differences are minimal with 4 shafts, but become noticeable with 8 or
more. I'd be interested in your opinions on loom designs that can have 8 or
more shafts but minimize these limitations?

I tried out the Megado at the ANWG conference, and I'm impressed with the
way the back beam moves when treadling to improve the shed. I think this
design minimizes some of the problems associated with jacks, and the loom is
lower-profile than many large or multishaft looms (though not truly
low-profile). But it can only be used as a computer loom, there is not an 8
shaft version of the design, with treadles, to my knowledge.

What other models take these problems into account? Can these different
problems even be resolved?
Laura