Landscape wall hanging


Alice
 

Hi all,
I would like to tap into the experience of this group.

I have received an assignment for a wall hanging. I have been given total freedom on colors or technique or material.
However, given it will come in a living room above a couch they have explicitly asked for a landscape format 

I have been thinking about this a lot lately, since by nature of warp and weft you mostly end up either portrait or square (at least, I did so far).

I can think of 3 options
1. Weave on a narrow warp 3 times the length, and hang three wall hangings next to each other to have the overall landscape form in the end. Could work, however puts a lot of preasure on me beating evenly.... But the 3 pieces could be woven with different colors in weft to make the design interesting. Not sure however how the customer would react to this option.

2. Weave "sideways", so the work is turned 90 degrees once from the loom. The nice sides , for sure the top, but perhaps to have it nicely hanging also the bottom would disappear in a seam/tunnel to allow for bars to hang it from. The hemmed sides would be the sides. Could work. Would allow to have different colors from left to right in the weft. Downside that you have more warp yarn waste and more time consuming is not really the issue. I am not working professionally and can afford these inefficiencies.

3. Weave "right side" on top of full width of the loom. Apart from putting strain om my shoulders, and increased inefficiencies on warp yarn and time to thread it could work. Options to make differences in design should come from the warp. 

Currently I am leaning towards option 2, since weft variation allows me to play before I start the true piece. Option 3 would have all "playing" fixed in the warp, if you understand what I mean.
But have never done this. Any ideas, pros and cons I have not thought of???

warm regards,
Alice van Duijnen 


Sara von Tresckow
 

I am currently working on a visual hanging in two panels. At the edges, I
have found that attaching a good quality bias binding (I use quilt binding)
very close to the selvedge or turned edge, pressing and turning makes a very
smooth edge that can be invisibly and somewhat loosely tacked by hand to the
reverse of the fabric. The top and bottom usually have a "tunnel", but there
are creative ways to attach a fabric strip along the selvedge (in this case
the top of the landscape form) and include a wide strip of Velcro that is
then attached to a matching strip of Velcro that is glued to a thin, flat
board holding the hanging points. This Velcro treatment is often used to
hang Navajo pieces.
For the bottom edge, to avoid using a rod that would force any unevenness in
the fabric to show, I use weighted curtain tape to allow the bottom edge to
make small adjustments as needed. That curtain band can be attached
invisibly.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


margcoe
 

Alice
I would think about hanging / framing methods. I have pieces with rods in a hem, a piece with Velcro, etc., and have seen some good presentations where textile is attached to a stretched canvas with and without wooden frames.

Let me know if you want pics of any of these.

  • Marg
  • (=^ ◡ ^=)
  • coeweaves.com
    e-weave-online.thinkific.com

    On Jan 15, 2022, at 9:23 AM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:

    I am currently working on a visual hanging in two panels. At the edges, I
    have found that attaching a good quality bias binding (I use quilt binding)
    very close to the selvedge or turned edge, pressing and turning makes a very
    smooth edge that can be invisibly and somewhat loosely tacked by hand to the
    reverse of the fabric. The top and bottom usually have a "tunnel", but there
    are creative ways to attach a fabric strip along the selvedge (in this case
    the top of the landscape form) and include a wide strip of Velcro that is
    then attached to a matching strip of Velcro that is glued to a thin, flat
    board holding the hanging points. This Velcro treatment is often used to
    hang Navajo pieces.
    For the bottom edge, to avoid using a rod that would force any unevenness in
    the fabric to show, I use weighted curtain tape to allow the bottom edge to
    make small adjustments as needed. That curtain band can be attached
    invisibly.

    Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
    sarav@...
    Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
    http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
    Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
    needs








    Nann Miller
     

    Alice,
    I think part of your hanging considerations should be the weight of the fabric.  What works on a framed canvas--light weight fabric--can't be done successfully with a heavier weight fabric.  The methods presented by Marg and Sara are valid, depending on the weight of the textile in question.

    One of the things I've done over the years is to weave a sample to check my sett, etc. and test the manner in which I plan to hang the textile.  A sample doesn't answer all the questions, but it goes a long way in finding out if a hem-with-a-rod or a woven edge, etc. are suitable.

    Good luck!
    Nann Miller

    From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of margcoe via groups.io <coe@...>
    Sent: Saturday, January 15, 2022 12:03 PM
    To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
    Subject: Re: [weavetech] Landscape wall hanging
     
    Alice
    I would think about hanging / framing methods. I have pieces with rods in a hem, a piece with Velcro, etc., and have seen some good presentations where textile is attached to a stretched canvas with and without wooden frames.

    Let me know if you want pics of any of these.

  • Marg
  • (=^ ◡ ^=)
  • coeweaves.com
    e-weave-online.thinkific.com

    On Jan 15, 2022, at 9:23 AM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:

    I am currently working on a visual hanging in two panels. At the edges, I
    have found that attaching a good quality bias binding (I use quilt binding)
    very close to the selvedge or turned edge, pressing and turning makes a very
    smooth edge that can be invisibly and somewhat loosely tacked by hand to the
    reverse of the fabric. The top and bottom usually have a "tunnel", but there
    are creative ways to attach a fabric strip along the selvedge (in this case
    the top of the landscape form) and include a wide strip of Velcro that is
    then attached to a matching strip of Velcro that is glued to a thin, flat
    board holding the hanging points. This Velcro treatment is often used to
    hang Navajo pieces.
    For the bottom edge, to avoid using a rod that would force any unevenness in
    the fabric to show, I use weighted curtain tape to allow the bottom edge to
    make small adjustments as needed. That curtain band can be attached
    invisibly.

    Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
    sarav@...
    Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
    http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
    Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
    needs








    Sara Nordling
     

    Alice,

    I do many woven wall pieces.  You can see the formats I use at my website (www.saranordling.com).  If you have specific questions on how I do anything, hanging, weaving, etc., please let me know.

    Sara


    Alice
     

    all,
    thanks for the good tips.

    Looking into how velcro would work I found the following link, by a governmental conservation institute in Canada. Looks very thorough.

    https://www.canada.ca/en/conservation-institute/services/conservation-preservation-publications/canadian-conservation-institute-notes/velcro-support-system-textiles.html

    Happy weaving,
    Alice