Topics

Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks


Lorelei Caracausa
 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.
Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?
In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)
Hints, please

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Selah Barling
 

Hello Eileen,
My low tech solution when this has happened is to fill a plastic gallon water jug. Hang the replacement thread off the back of the loom. Place the full jug on top. It does require me to get up and release before advancing the warp, but it holds it in place just fine. A weight or small stack of books could serve the same.
Hope this helps,
Selah

On Thursday, August 27, 2020, 02:17:01 PM PDT, Lorelei Caracausa <beeweaverstudio@...> wrote:


A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.
Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?
In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)
Hints, please

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Sara von Tresckow
 

Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Elizabeth Moncrief
 

Because I weave a lot of painted warps, I do just what Sara recommends...I wind 2-3 extra warp ends, paint the warp chain, wind it on and then pull those 2-3 ends off of the warp beam in equal measure to hang loose.  That way if you break a thread you have one right there to pick up AND it is in the same color sequence that you’re weaving.  Not doing so leaves you trying to find a replacement that is the same color but you’ll never be able to match the painted warp color-way. 
Having worked so well for me with painted warps, I do it for all warps now. 

Sent from Liz Moncrief,    www.aweaversway.com
Instagram address:   Moncriefliz 


On Aug 27, 2020, at 2:43 PM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:



Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Nann Miller
 

We estimate the length of the remaining warp, cut a warp yarn of that length, thread it from the back of the loom through the heddle and reed and thread it into the web for about an inch.  Then wind the remainder of that yarn onto an empty cone, slide a second empty cone of the same size over the top of the first.  This weights the yarn.  Then, and this is the important part: we take a long shoelace, drape it over the cones so it drags on the floor--thus preventing the untwisting/breaking.  I know it sounds unlikely, but it works--for any yarn I've ever tried, including singles.
Nann Miller


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Elizabeth Moncrief via groups.io <l.moncrief@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 5:53 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks
 
Because I weave a lot of painted warps, I do just what Sara recommends...I wind 2-3 extra warp ends, paint the warp chain, wind it on and then pull those 2-3 ends off of the warp beam in equal measure to hang loose.  That way if you break a thread you have one right there to pick up AND it is in the same color sequence that you’re weaving.  Not doing so leaves you trying to find a replacement that is the same color but you’ll never be able to match the painted warp color-way. 
Having worked so well for me with painted warps, I do it for all warps now. 

Sent from Liz Moncrief,    www.aweaversway.com
Instagram address:   Moncriefliz 


On Aug 27, 2020, at 2:43 PM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:



Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Sara von Tresckow
 

Nan,

Maybe that seems to work, but tying on or using the repair warp and pinning assures that the warp end always has just the right tension as well. Those singly weighted ends cause tension issues and they continue the length of the warp.

Splicing and pinning gets you up and going quickly and accurately.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nann Miller
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 5:06 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

We estimate the length of the remaining warp, cut a warp yarn of that length, thread it from the back of the loom through the heddle and reed and thread it into the web for about an inch.  Then wind the remainder of that yarn onto an empty cone, slide a second empty cone of the same size over the top of the first.  This weights the yarn.  Then, and this is the important part: we take a long shoelace, drape it over the cones so it drags on the floor--thus preventing the untwisting/breaking.  I know it sounds unlikely, but it works--for any yarn I've ever tried, including singles.

Nann Miller

 


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Elizabeth Moncrief via groups.io <l.moncrief@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 5:53 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

Because I weave a lot of painted warps, I do just what Sara recommends...I wind 2-3 extra warp ends, paint the warp chain, wind it on and then pull those 2-3 ends off of the warp beam in equal measure to hang loose.  That way if you break a thread you have one right there to pick up AND it is in the same color sequence that you’re weaving.  Not doing so leaves you trying to find a replacement that is the same color but you’ll never be able to match the painted warp color-way. 

Having worked so well for me with painted warps, I do it for all warps now. 

Sent from Liz Moncrief,    www.aweaversway.com

Instagram address:   Moncriefliz 

 



On Aug 27, 2020, at 2:43 PM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:



Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Gloria Pitt
 

I’ve always done the same as Elizabeth with hand-dyed warps, especially essential with singles yarns. I wind in a few extra before dyeing and leave them unthreaded hanging off the back of the loom as insurance.
Gloria ( in the UK)


Lorelei Caracausa
 

Sara, I have tried a variation on this, bit am curious how the "long tail" doesn't interfere with the shed?  Every time I have left any sort of extra tails or loops in the space between the back beam and the shafts, they tend to reach out and grab or wrap around other adjacent warps, and eventually making the distance from shaft to "tangle" so untenable that more warps snap.  


On Thu, Aug 27, 2020, 4:43 PM Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:

Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


bigwhitesofadog
 

I've always done what Sara does.  I keep a spool of whatever the warp is handy.  Two ply yarns untwist as easily as singles.  If you clamp a stick to the spool, and brace it against the loom, it won't untwist.  I do this with floating selvedges I forgot to beam.  But you have to keep minding these spools.  With the short thread method you're done in two operations.


Sharon Alderman
 

If I have a broken warp thread, I measure out a replacement thread, needle weave it into the warp, take it through the reed and the empty heddle and then tension it the same as its neighbors and use a hemostat to clamp it to its neighbors as far back as possible.  When the broken end is long enough I put it into the web and take out the repair warp end.

Hemostats are used in surgeries to clamp off little bleeding veins, but are handy for soldering small electronics pieces (no burned fingers) and for tying fishing flies, to name a few uses.  They can be expensive, but bought in large numbers at Firemountaingems.com are only a little more than a dollar.

Dangling things runs the risk of untwisting the yarn, and even more dangerous, attracting the eyes of cats who love to bat at such objects.

Sharon Alderman


Sara von Tresckow
 

I make that tail very long. That way, soon after it rounds the back beam, I
can bring it forward to the fell line and pin it.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


Elizabeth Arthur
 

I also use this method of repairing warp threads. 

I like it because there is no weighting of threads and once the thread is tied in, I can handle the rest at the front of my loom.  I learned this method from Jane Stafford's Online Guild.

Liz

On August 28, 2020 10:43:06 AM "Sara von Tresckow" <sarav@...> wrote:

I make that tail very long. That way, soon after it rounds the back beam, I
can bring it forward to the fell line and pin it.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough” 
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs





kathyo
 

I do mostly as Sara said.
1. Set cone of warp behind loom and pull thread-yarn over back beam and thread through heddle to fell line.
2. Weave in the end towards the weaver from fell line about an inch or however much you like.
3. Put a long pin, quilt or T-pin, about parallel to fell and do a figure 8 around pin.
4. Again at back of loom, cut sufficient length of yarn from cone to work past the weak point and bow tie new end to old broken end.
5. You can keep moving bow until you are able to replace new repair end by weaving the old end back in at fell line.

The bow need never come over the back beam at all. And takes more time to describe than to do... and sounds much more fiddling than it actually is in practice.

Just a thought...

kathyo


Lala de Dios
 

I was also taught to use this method from my beginnings in weaving. I try to to bow tie as down as possible so that it takes time until the tie appears over the back beam. When this happens I mundo the tie, re-tie downwards and go on weaving.


Lala de Dios

Indigo Estudio Textil
Ciempozuelos, 3
28359 Titulcia - Madrid
Tel. 91 8010907 - 658 059627
www.indigotextil.com
Skype Lala de Dios
www.indigotextil.com
https://www.facebook.com/lala.dedios.7
https://www.facebook.com/IndigoEstudioTextil?fref=ts

El 28 ago 2020, a las 18:33, kathyo <kathyanneolson@...> escribió:

I do mostly as Sara said.
1. Set cone of warp behind loom and pull thread-yarn over back beam and thread through heddle to fell line.
2. Weave in the end towards the weaver from fell line about an inch or however much you like.
3. Put a long pin, quilt or T-pin, about parallel to fell and do a figure 8 around pin.
4. Again at back of loom, cut sufficient length of yarn from cone to work past the weak point and bow tie new end to old broken end.
5. You can keep moving bow until you are able to replace new repair end by weaving the old end back in at fell line.

The bow need never come over the back beam at all. And takes more time to describe than to do... and sounds much more fiddling than it actually is in practice.

Just a thought...

kathyo




margcoe
 

Sara,

With all respect, I think Nann’s credentials stand up to most weavers in Germany, professional or not.

When, if, a knot arises during weaving, I add a new warp with number of weights such that the tension is the same as the warp, and secured so that it doesn't untwist. This is pinned to the web with a t-pin.

While burling and mending I weave in the ends. This is what professional where I come from do.

Sent from iDevice
coeweaves.com
e-weave-online.thinkific.com



Sara von Tresckow
 

That's the same as what I do - except that the solution, especially on long
warps, is completed when that tail is pinned to the fell line. Burling done
same as you do.


Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


Joe P
 

Hi Everyone 

First let's look at how the warp has been put on the sectional warp beam on the loom in the picture, I am not going to use the word professional. It is all crossed and twisted. 

The warp has not been threaded though the heddles in the same order the warp was put in each section. Because this has not been done the warp in each section is all cross twisted and will yes break because of twist knots . If the warp on the loom was shorter the weaver could add the lease stick in to the warp and work the twist out of the warp as advanced but the warp is too long to do this the twist will build up way too much behind the lease sticks Making a bigger mess.

1 Un-thread the loom 

2 let the warp stay over the back-breast beam. 

3 check the 1st section comb out any sag with fingers and tap it to the back-breast beam, do this with all sections.

4 Now go to the start of the warp coming off of the section feed the threads in order coming off the section to the back side of the heddles in the order the warp was wound in the section keeping a close eye you are not crossing warps that will make twisting like warp now has on your loom.

If you do not fix the warp as you weave the warp off of the sectional beam the twisting of the warp coming off the sections is going build up more twist and in this taking place you are going to be breaking more threads, then you are going want to make professional knots. 

Keep weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A.







From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of margcoe <coe@...>
Sent: Friday, August 28, 2020 2:00 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks
 
Sara,

With all respect, I think Nann’s credentials stand up to most weavers in Germany, professional or not.

When, if, a knot arises during weaving, I add a new warp with number of weights such that the tension is the same as the warp, and secured so that it doesn't untwist. This is pinned to the web with a t-pin.

While burling and mending I weave in the ends. This is what professional where I come from do.

Sent from iDevice
coeweaves.com
e-weave-online.thinkific.com



margcoe
 

Joe, with respect, and thank you for your concern, but what you’re seeing in the image bears no relationship to how it was beamed or threaded.

This is a new loom, and this is a test sample. After beaming and threading, evenly, the warp needed to be unwound for one rotation — 1/2 yard. Rebeaming it straight wasn't a priority.  Each section is even and it is weaving just fine, no sags. I’m working on tension required for weft now.

As soon as the first sample is woven, the sections will line up just fine.

I do know what I'm doing.

Marg



Sent from iDevice
coeweaves.com
e-weave-online.thinkific.com


Joe P
 

Hi Marg 

From the picture I thought the whole length of warp was going to feed off the sectional beam in the twisted cross treaded way,  creating broken thread problems any weaver would have thought as I did that has used a sectional warp beam, I will Marg even you. I am so glad to read you just turned back one turn. "smiling" 

Over the years I have been a weaver helping new weavers, you have no Idea what I have fixed in sectional warping mess. At, the time I shook my head, looking back I can smile. I years ago, worked for the state helping handicapped weavers. It is sad the program was ended. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A.     


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of margcoe <coe@...>
Sent: Friday, August 28, 2020 3:50 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks
 
Joe, with respect, and thank you for your concern, but what you’re seeing in the image bears no relationship to how it was beamed or threaded.

This is a new loom, and this is a test sample. After beaming and threading, evenly, the warp needed to be unwound for one rotation — 1/2 yard. Rebeaming it straight wasn't a priority.  Each section is even and it is weaving just fine, no sags. I’m working on tension required for weft now.

As soon as the first sample is woven, the sections will line up just fine.

I do know what I'm doing.

Marg



Sent from iDevice
coeweaves.com
e-weave-online.thinkific.com


NORMA STALEY
 

Lorelei,
The method used in folkschools in Norway, 50 years ago, is to thread in the repair thread and pin to web. The length of repair thread behind the heddles is tied in a bow to the broken warp at the back beam.  This should be a firm bow that can be untied, but will not loosen. When the weaving has advanced enough you can rethread the broken end and pin to the web, replacing the first repair thread. 
It worked for me for years.

Hope it works for you.
Norma Smayda

On Friday, August 28, 2020, 06:58:31 PM EDT, Joe P <rugsbyjoe@...> wrote:


Hi Marg 

From the picture I thought the whole length of warp was going to feed off the sectional beam in the twisted cross treaded way,  creating broken thread problems any weaver would have thought as I did that has used a sectional warp beam, I will Marg even you. I am so glad to read you just turned back one turn. "smiling" 

Over the years I have been a weaver helping new weavers, you have no Idea what I have fixed in sectional warping mess. At, the time I shook my head, looking back I can smile. I years ago, worked for the state helping handicapped weavers. It is sad the program was ended. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A.     

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of margcoe <coe@...>
Sent: Friday, August 28, 2020 3:50 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks
 
Joe, with respect, and thank you for your concern, but what you’re seeing in the image bears no relationship to how it was beamed or threaded.

This is a new loom, and this is a test sample. After beaming and threading, evenly, the warp needed to be unwound for one rotation — 1/2 yard. Rebeaming it straight wasn't a priority.  Each section is even and it is weaving just fine, no sags. I’m working on tension required for weft now.

As soon as the first sample is woven, the sections will line up just fine.

I do know what I'm doing.

Marg



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