dobby loom satisfaction


Lynne Renz
 

If you have a compu-dobby loom, I'm interested in learning more about how satisfied you are with your loom.
What kind of loom do you have?  
How long have you had it?
What do you love about it?
What don't you love about it?


Sara von Tresckow
 

I've been using a 16 shaft Toika dobby for over ten years. The first unit
was used and needed replacement a few years back -new one continues to
function well. Mounted it on an existing countermarche loom with no issues.
Quiet, reliable, no need for heavy treadles - just a small foot pedal.
Resulting fabrics are lovely. Because of gravity countermarche, not suited
well for rugs or very heavy fabrics.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


margcoe
 

I’ve had a computer Dobby loom for 28 years. The latest, AVL K loom with is my favorite.

I like that the Dobby does not require a driver fron weave design software. I love the principles of the new built in auto advance which is no longer based on the beater. The methods for entering and controlling, warp tension, ppi, etc., are great.  The small footprint, actual, from the depth being less as countermarche action gives a good shed, and visual from a smaller height.

  • Marg
  • 🦔
  • (=^ ◡ ^=)
  • coeweaves.com
    e-weave-online.thinkific.com


    On Oct 30, 2022, at 9:06 AM, Lynne Renz via groups.io <alicianfang@...> wrote:

    If you have a compu-dobby loom, I'm interested in learning more about how satisfied you are with your loom.
    What kind of loom do you have?  
    How long have you had it?
    What do you love about it?
    What don't you love about it?


    Chuck Colht
     

    I've had my 16 shaft Leclerc Weaverbird for 2 years.
    Regarding dobby looms in general, I love it with it.  Treadling complex patterns has always been a challenge for me so this is the only way I can weave them
    The Weaverbird is a solid machine but the mechanics could use some work.
    You have to be very careful when treadling to avoid jams. I'm working on a solution for that.
    There are other changes I've made or plan to improve the ergonomics.

    Overall I can still recommend it. 
    Full disclosure: I'm just a hobbyist with only about 6 years total weaving experience 


    Janell Neulinger
     

    I put a 24 shaft Toika dobby on a Glimakra standard and I thoroughly enjoy how easy it is to “treadle” a long or complicated sequence of lifts.  And treadling the threading is wonderful.

    Trade offs for me: 
    1. It needs electricity, which is a bummer during power outages  
    2. I have to keep a ladder handy to access and oil the mechanism several times per year.
    3. It is loud, relative to the original countermarche with texsolv heddles. It’s probably a wash, or quieter, than a Jack loom with metal heddles. 

    4. The dobby is screwed into the top rails, and it is too heavy and awkward for me to lift solo, so I have lost the flexibility of completely breaking down the Glimakra and reassembling it whenever the whim strikes me. 

    —janell

     


    Teresa Edmisten
     

    I have a 32 shaft Louet Megado v2 since 2019. It’s my first floor loom and, apart from occasionally wanting to lift shafts separately due to sticky threads or split shed weaving, I think it is absolutely perfect. Huge shed, I run it from my iPad. Not interested in auto advance, etc. so it and it’s sister Delta will keep me happy.  They would welcome a TC2 to the family though…

    Teresa Edmisten 

    I support Museum of Design Atlanta.
    Http://museumofdesign.org

    On Oct 30, 2022, at 1:41 PM, Chuck Colht <chuck@...> wrote:

    I've had my 16 shaft Leclerc Weaverbird for 2 years.
    Regarding dobby looms in general, I love it with it.  Treadling complex patterns has always been a challenge for me so this is the only way I can weave them
    The Weaverbird is a solid machine but the mechanics could use some work.
    You have to be very careful when treadling to avoid jams. I'm working on a solution for that.
    There are other changes I've made or plan to improve the ergonomics.

    Overall I can still recommend it. 
    Full disclosure: I'm just a hobbyist with only about 6 years total weaving experience 


    Pam Carr
     

    I got my 1st AVL 40" Folding dobby loom 16S in the late 90s, used, with CD I. I admit I have not used it that much but liked it when I did. I couple of years ago I found a Combby 8 unit for my Baby Wolf and absolutely love working on that one. Last year I bought 2-24S 24" Workshop Dobby Looms with CD3. Not sure I can ever go back to a regular treadle loom again, It is so much faster to weave and long sequences are easily done. Although it is not as easy to change up treadling in the middle of a weaving, such as doing a workshop, but I have gotten much quicker at that. I only wish I knew more about the mechanics of the dobbies so I could more easily troubleshoot and repair if necessary, and not be intimidated. I have really had very little problems with any of them. My only dilemma would be if we lost power to the house (like in a storm such as Ian (we didn't, thank goodness). Then I wouldn't be able to use them unless I had a really good generator. That's the most troubling aspect, for me. I do have a couple of table looms and a direct tie up 4 shaft floor loom, so all would not be totally lost. If I had the wherewithal, I wouldn't mind a K loom, but of course, the ultimate would be a TC-2 (big grin).


    Janet Stollnitz
     

    I’ve woven on an AVL Compu-Dobby since 1992 and much prefer it to a treadle loom. I currently weave on a 40-shaft, 40” A-Series AVL as well as a 24-shaft, 24” WDL. Both are wonderful looms. The A-series is a workhorse loom with lots of features such as the sandpaper beam, cloth storage at the back of the loom, auto-advance, and more. My first dobby loom came with the manual dobby and I quickly switched to the computerized dobby. Like cars, each manufacturer and model has different features.

     

    Janet

     

    _._,_._,_


    Lorraine FAST
     

    I have a 16 shaft Toika Eeva (purchased in 2019) and love it.  I find it easy, and even fun to warp, and much easier on my back to thread.  I love the look of the large Scandinavian loom and have it in a prominent place in our new home.  Of course I love the simplicity of weaving complex patterns without the worry of a treadling error.  I enjoy setting up the patterns on the computer and working with the software.  Another thing I love about it is the worm gear and the ease of advancing the warp from the front.  One challenge for me was to weave boundweave on opposites since you need to program that all in to the computer.  On my Schacht standard I could design as I go and play with patterns but I came up with a work around to kind of design as I go with the computer.  As Sarah mentioned it isn’t the greatest for rugs but I currently have my 4th rug warped and ready to go.  Two out of the 3 competed ones are fairly decent.  I am not an expert weaver and so this might not be a good idea, but I love the overhead beater and have decided to use it as a substitute for my warping trapeze and it works well for me.  I love this loom so much I recently sold my Schacht standard 8 shaft loom since it had been totally unused since getting this one.  As someone else mentioned it isn’t easy to get the computer unit off the top of the loom when you want to disassemble it but once that is done the loom is easy to knock down and reassemble.  We recently moved across the country and it survived the move in great shape.  The computer unit itself is fairly unobtrusive and most casual (non weaving) observers would not know it is computer driven unless you tell them.
    Lorraine

    Sent from Lorraine's iPad

    On Oct 30, 2022, at 11:06 AM, Lynne Renz <alicianfang@...> wrote:

    If you have a compu-dobby loom, I'm interested in learning more about how satisfied you are with your loom.
    What kind of loom do you have?  
    How long have you had it?
    What do you love about it?
    What don't you love about it?


    Nann Miller
     

    Lynne,
    This is a familiar group of questions, having asked them myself.

    • What kind of loom do you have?  ​I have a 51" , 32-shaft Megado (I have also owned a 16-shaft AVL PDL loom in the past and sold it.)
    • How long have you had it?​  I believe I am the third owner, the first owner downsized because of old age, and the second owner died.  I have had it about 4 years.
    • What do you love about it? Nearly everything!  It is a well thought out loom.  It works well.  It needs little adjustment between projects, there is excellent on-line help and it's usually available within 24 hours. (He does occasionally travel or take a vacation, but he's still quite prompt!). I did not find this help with AVL until I purchased a service contract; and it was always needing adjustment.
    • What don't you love about it? I really prefer steel heddles, but on a 32-shaft loom, neither you or the compu-dobby could lift the shafts with metal heddles on them.  I don't weave rugs, but I don't know that it would weave a heavy, tightly packed rug.
    I have been weaving for over 50 years.  I've owned Macombers which I have used extensively until I purchased the Megado.  Over the years, I've had occasion to use Gilmores, Harrisville, Dorset, several LeClercs, Baby and Mighty Wolfs, Gallinger, Loomcraft, Norwood, and Harold loom.  As I grew older, the Macomber became hard to use as I can no longer get down on the floor to tie it up, and the 16-shafts were hard to lift (major back issues).  The Megado works with 4 shafts or all 32, any everything in between, and the treadle, being full width and light weight, is easy to lift.

    If you have specific questions, please feel comfortable asking.
    Good luck.
    Nann Miller

    From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Lynne Renz via groups.io <alicianfang@...>
    Sent: Sunday, October 30, 2022 12:06 PM
    To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
    Subject: [weavetech] dobby loom satisfaction
     
    If you have a compu-dobby loom, I'm interested in learning more about how satisfied you are with your loom.
    What kind of loom do you have?  
    How long have you had it?
    What do you love about it?
    What don't you love about it?


    Tina Hilton
     

    My first one was a used AVL PDL 16 shaft 60" loom.  I think I bought it around 2009.  I really liked the extra shafts and being able to design in the lift plan.  I got some money when my mom passed away and bought another AVL, this time a new A-series 40 shaft 40" weaving width.  I really like it.  Right now, it's still in pieces after moving.  Hopefully I'll find ALL the pieces and get it up and running again soon.

    On Sun, Oct 30, 2022 at 3:08 PM Nann Miller <ngmille@...> wrote:
    Lynne,
    This is a familiar group of questions, having asked them myself.

    • What kind of loom do you have?  ​I have a 51" , 32-shaft Megado (I have also owned a 16-shaft AVL PDL loom in the past and sold it.)
    • How long have you had it?​  I believe I am the third owner, the first owner downsized because of old age, and the second owner died.  I have had it about 4 years.
    • What do you love about it? Nearly everything!  It is a well thought out loom.  It works well.  It needs little adjustment between projects, there is excellent on-line help and it's usually available within 24 hours. (He does occasionally travel or take a vacation, but he's still quite prompt!). I did not find this help with AVL until I purchased a service contract; and it was always needing adjustment.
    • What don't you love about it? I really prefer steel heddles, but on a 32-shaft loom, neither you or the compu-dobby could lift the shafts with metal heddles on them.  I don't weave rugs, but I don't know that it would weave a heavy, tightly packed rug.
    I have been weaving for over 50 years.  I've owned Macombers which I have used extensively until I purchased the Megado.  Over the years, I've had occasion to use Gilmores, Harrisville, Dorset, several LeClercs, Baby and Mighty Wolfs, Gallinger, Loomcraft, Norwood, and Harold loom.  As I grew older, the Macomber became hard to use as I can no longer get down on the floor to tie it up, and the 16-shafts were hard to lift (major back issues).  The Megado works with 4 shafts or all 32, any everything in between, and the treadle, being full width and light weight, is easy to lift.

    If you have specific questions, please feel comfortable asking.
    Good luck.
    Nann Miller

    From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Lynne Renz via groups.io <alicianfang=passemail.net@groups.io>
    Sent: Sunday, October 30, 2022 12:06 PM
    To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
    Subject: [weavetech] dobby loom satisfaction
     
    If you have a compu-dobby loom, I'm interested in learning more about how satisfied you are with your loom.
    What kind of loom do you have?  
    How long have you had it?
    What do you love about it?
    What don't you love about it?


    Clare Settle
     

    I’ve had a Baby Wolf with a Commby attachment (twice), which worked rather well.

    My first AVL was a 16 shaft Compudobby I. Next was a 24 shaft 30” AVL with a Compudobby II. Now I have a 30” 40 shaft AVL with a Compudobby IV. One of the things I like best is the eLift. I can lift 38 shafts or 1 shaft with the touch of a pedal. Makes my back so much happier. The other change I made was I checked my position ergonomically (thank you, Laura Fry), and realized I was sitting far too low. I switched to a padded counter stool and all is well.

    I also have a 24” 24 shaft AVL Workshop loom with a Compudobby iV+. It’s a delightful loom, and easy to warp.

    On either loom, I’ve learned that I can weave whatever number of shaft project I want to, just as long as the draft has all the loom shafts. The unused shafts happily sit there without complaint.

    Like Tina Hilton, my AVLs are in storage, with the A-series in sticks. The Workshop Dobby didn’t need to be disassembled, but everything else in storage, so there’s no point in have the loom in my temporary abode. Once my new home is completed, I’ll have fun reassembling everything. I’ve done this multiple times, and am confident it will go well.

    Clare


    bigwhitesofadog
     

    I bought a 16 shaft AVL about 8 years ago from a friend.  It had a mechanical Dobby and a Compu Dobby I, and was made in 1986.  She was using the mechanical Dobby because she thought the CD could only be operated be an old computer.  I got a serial adapter and used the CD for about a year before it died.  By then I was hooked on computer pattern design and loom control.  I replaced the CD I with a CD IV, and it has been my reliable workhorse ever since.  The only problem I have had was when my studio got too hot for it.  A small AC fixed that.  
    I had the opportunity to get a used 24 shaft TDL from AVL with automatic cloth advance and took it.  This loom was a trade in, probably for a new K model, and is a mixed blessing.  It is fast, the two box fly shuttle does a two shuttle weave effortlessly, and the cloth advance is lovely.  #3 shaft has been a problem from the very beginning, at first failing occasionally, them operating perfectly after replacing the solenoid.  Now #3 is not working, and a new solenoid did not fix it.
    I love my AVLs,. I have always gotten quick support from AVL.  I like being able to design several pattern s on a common threading, changing from one to another by pulling up a new file.  The cloth storage and sandpaper beam make weaving faster and easier, with less loom waste.
    These are complex machines and can be hard to troubleshoot.  I was at loss one summer when the 16 shaft seemed to lose it periodically.  A plea for help brought several ideas, and I realized the problems started when I plugged the summer beverage refrigerator in downstairs.  A dedicated line from the breaker box to the studio stopped the problem.
    I suspect you will learn to like whatever you choose.  I like the fact that AVL continues to support its older products.  Have fun!
    Sandra


    Janene Driscoll
     

    I upgraded my 10 shaft standard 60” Glimakra to a 16 shaft Toika computer driven loom in 2020. I love it. I bought the upgrade from Webs and they sell it with WeavePoint software to run it. WeavePoint is only available on PC. I’m a Mac “person”, so I got a used PC to run it and put Fiberworks on it too. I’ve since learned that Fiberworks Mac will run it, but so far I’ve only run it with the PC. 

    The single foot pedal is easy on my hips and legs and works smoothly and relatively quietly. 

    I figured out how to program it to treadle the threading which makes complex threadings a breeze. 

    I have a computer tech friend who helped me put the computer box together and onto the castle. He also helped get the computer talking to the magic box on the loom. I couldn’t have done that solo. 

    Since I upgraded from a Glimakra I don’t have the advance features of the Toika, but saved several thousand dollars by using my current loom. 

    And it shipped without too much delay from Finland to Massachusetts to Alaska during the pandemic. 
    I certainly recommend it.  
    Janene 
    My computer IT friend putting the brain onto the top bars before putting them on the loom. 



    On Sun, Oct 30, 2022 at 6:08 PM Clare Settle <cjsettle@...> wrote:
    I’ve had a Baby Wolf with a Commby attachment (twice), which worked rather well. 

    My first AVL was a 16 shaft Compudobby I.  Next was a 24 shaft 30” AVL with a Compudobby II.  Now I have a 30” 40 shaft AVL with a Compudobby IV.  One of the things I like best is the eLift.  I can lift 38 shafts or 1 shaft with the touch of a pedal.  Makes my back so much happier.  The other change I made was I checked my position ergonomically (thank you, Laura Fry), and realized I was sitting far too low.  I switched to a padded counter stool and all is well. 

    I also have a 24” 24 shaft AVL Workshop loom with a Compudobby iV+.  It’s a delightful loom, and easy to warp. 

    On either loom, I’ve learned that I can weave whatever number of shaft project I want to, just as long as the draft has all the loom shafts.  The unused shafts happily sit there without complaint.

    Like Tina Hilton, my AVLs are in storage, with the A-series in sticks.  The Workshop Dobby didn’t need to be disassembled, but everything else in storage, so there’s no point in have the loom in my temporary abode.  Once my new home is completed, I’ll have fun reassembling everything.  I’ve done this multiple times, and am confident it will go well.

    Clare






    Charlene Marietti
     

    My first AVL was a rescue. Number 00129, 12 shaft, negative dobby, FDL, had begun life at FIT and I suspect that as soon as a computer-based driver for the loom was developed, it was discarded. There are no records to date this loom specifically, but AVL estimates early 1980s. 
    I wove on it for about two years before making the decision to trade up to an AVL with CompuDobby. 
    What I didn’t like: Not only is pegging the dobby bars time-consuming, the restrictions to designs (managing the length of the working dobby chain of bars) was definitely a factor in my decision. I sold it for $500, less than I had invested in it to get it in working order. Great intro loom as getting it back into working order helped me understand how they worked.
    My current AVL is a 16-shaft 1984 FDL w/CD that was refurbished by AVL. 
    I have had it about four years.
    What I love: Computer design capabilities. (no more pegging!) It’s a work horse!
    What don’t I love: Computer capabilities aside, AVLs are complex mechanical machines. When something isn’t working right, it can take some time to figure out where the problem is and fix it. I recently was having trouble with a non-responsive shaft (16): The problem was resolved with a small change to the turnbuckle on a treadle cables.

    On Sun, Oct 30, 2022 at 12:06 PM Lynne Renz <alicianfang@...> wrote:
    If you have a compu-dobby loom, I'm interested in learning more about how satisfied you are with your loom.
    What kind of loom do you have?  
    How long have you had it?
    What do you love about it?
    What don't you love about it?


    sue_briney
     

    Hi - 
    I had an AVL manual dobby loom with an auto-advance that I loved.  But it ultimately became too much effort for my right treadling leg, due to an issue with my foot.  I looked into other options that require less physical effort and luckily found a used 16 shaft Louet Megado compudobby loom.  I love the ease of treadling with this loom.

    There are times that I miss the manual dobby loom, since minor issues are no longer manual mechanical fixes. Now if I encounter a glitch, I have to investigate all of the electronic interfaces.  But I don't miss pegging the dobby bars.  

    Sue Briney


    Susan Rubendall
     

    I used a Compudobby for many years but sold it when I moved to Illinois. After several years, I bought a manual dobby, which worked fine for me. I added two devices that really increased my efficiency and which I would recommend to any production weaver:
    1. AVL’s automatic cloth winder; 2. A rolling temple. With those two devices, you can weave for hours without pausing to make adjustments. (Still a good idea to get up and stretch regularly.)
    Sadly, I need to sell my lovely loom as my body insists on getting older.

    Susan Rubendall
    E-mail: susanrubendall@...


    Elizabeth Arthur
     

    I have a 48" 16s AVL  made in 1987 which I love. 

    It had at least one other owner. I bought it used and have figured it out bit by bit.

    Originally a mechanical Dobby, I did not enjoy all the time I spent pegging bars. It now has a CD 4.5 that I drive with Fiberworks.

    It weaves wonderfully.  I love the LiveWeight tensioning  Auto Advance and the Cloth Storage System. One of these days, I master the Double Box Fly Shuttle and using the second beam.

    I do have shaft envy for even more shafts. Maybe someday I'll upgrade.  

    For now I'll be grateful that i found and bought this loom.

    Liz






    suki248
     

    I have had three different Dobby looms. I have been weaving for 13 years and always had one.

    I particularly like the fact that I am not limited by the number of treadles, and do not have to remember a complicated treadling sequence.

    I did have a Baby Wolf with a mechanical Dobby and at times felt limited by the number of lags I had.

    I currently have a Megado with 32 shafts. It is a lovely loom and is very light to treadle.

    I wove on a large AVL mechanical dobby at a workshop and it was very heavy and my body was well aware of physical task

    Depending on your physical situation - looking for a loom lets you weave as you age is a consideration as well as the dobby which gives you more latitude in what you can weave.

    Charlene

    On 10/30/2022 12:06 PM, Lynne Renz wrote:

    If you have a compu-dobby loom, I'm interested in learning more about how satisfied you are with your loom.
    What kind of loom do you have?  
    How long have you had it?
    What do you love about it?
    What don't you love about it?


    SANDRA HUTTON
     

    I also have a 32 shaft Megado--one of the first to come to the US after it was first shown at the Atlanta Convergence.  It is a wonderful loom and so easy to warp and weave on.  The one drawback is moving heddles from one shaft to another.  It helps to have a lot of heddles and be able to move unthreaded heddles between those that are threaded.

    Sandy Hutton



    Sent from Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


    -------- Original message --------
    From: suki248 <caloosa@...>
    Date: 11/1/22 5:11 AM (GMT-07:00)
    To: weavetech@groups.io
    Subject: Re: [weavetech] dobby loom satisfaction

    I have had three different Dobby looms. I have been weaving for 13 years and always had one.

    I particularly like the fact that I am not limited by the number of treadles, and do not have to remember a complicated treadling sequence.

    I did have a Baby Wolf with a mechanical Dobby and at times felt limited by the number of lags I had.

    I currently have a Megado with 32 shafts. It is a lovely loom and is very light to treadle.

    I wove on a large AVL mechanical dobby at a workshop and it was very heavy and my body was well aware of physical task

    Depending on your physical situation - looking for a loom lets you weave as you age is a consideration as well as the dobby which gives you more latitude in what you can weave.

    Charlene

    On 10/30/2022 12:06 PM, Lynne Renz wrote:
    If you have a compu-dobby loom, I'm interested in learning more about how satisfied you are with your loom.
    What kind of loom do you have?  
    How long have you had it?
    What do you love about it?
    What don't you love about it?