Weaving terms for structures


Sally O
 

A new weaver asked me if "broken twill" was the correct term to use for her weaving "structure" after she completed samples from a recent workshop. The instructor provided the draft and used that term, so in that context I thought it was okay.

However, I did not see the actual draft. That got me to thinking, could "broken twill" actually mean a variety of different structures? In other words, it's a pretty broad term, right? When searching the term in Handweaving.net, a whole variety of patterns come up, some with a straight draw threading where the twill break happens in the treadling, and some with the break happening in the tie-up.

Yes, I floundered about with my edition of Emery in the pursuit of an anwer.

While asking this question, I am thrown back to thinking about Sara von Treskow's presentation at CWS in Maryland many years ago. She presented a draft naming system that was very precise by identifying the floats, warp or weft, in order, as part of the naming convention. With the resulting name, you immediately knew a lot more about the structure construction without even seeing a draft.

The new weaver was seeking a simple answer to complete her sample sheet - but her question left me with more questions.

Sally


Subu
 

I was taught, albeit years ago, that the term broken twill meant that a twill structure was being woven but the usual twill line was broken either in warp or weft.  It did not matter if the break was due to threading or treadling, as any weave structure is determined by the actual interlacement of the threads, not by a single element of the whole.  There are variations on the way broken twill can be created, just like there are myriad variations on a twill……so the broad term, broken twill, was used in the correct context, imho.

 

Su 😊

 

From: weavetech@groups.io On Behalf Of Sally O
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2021 10:19 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Weaving terms for structures

 

A new weaver asked me if "broken twill" was the correct term to use for her weaving "structure" after she completed samples from a recent workshop. The instructor provided the draft and used that term, so in that context I thought it was okay.

However, I did not see the actual draft. That got me to thinking, could "broken twill" actually mean a variety of different structures? In other words, it's a pretty broad term, right? When searching the term in Handweaving.net, a whole variety of patterns come up, some with a straight draw threading where the twill break happens in the treadling, and some with the break happening in the tie-up.

Yes, I floundered about with my edition of Emery in the pursuit of an anwer.

While asking this question, I am thrown back to thinking about Sara von Treskow's presentation at CWS in Maryland many years ago. She presented a draft naming system that was very precise by identifying the floats, warp or weft, in order, as part of the naming convention. With the resulting name, you immediately knew a lot more about the structure construction without even seeing a draft.

The new weaver was seeking a simple answer to complete her sample sheet - but her question left me with more questions.

Sally


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Robyn Spady
 

A broken twill is a twill that will cross the twill circle.  Many twills, e.g., straight draw, point draw, extended point, etc., revolve around the circumference of the twill circle . . . 1-2-3-4, 1-2-3-4-3-2-1, 1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4-3-2-1-4-3-2-1 . . . a broken twill may rotate around the circumference of the twill circle, but it will eventually cross it . . . 1-2-3-4-2-1-4-3 . . . in that sequence the twill circle is cross when the sequence goes from 4 to 2.

Many twills may be more than one thing.  For example, an advancing twill may also be a broken twill.  If a run of five and a step of one is used, the sequence goes 1-2-3-4-5-2-3-4-5-6-3-4-5-6-7...  The twill breaks when one run ends and the next one begins (e.g., 5-2, 6-3).  However, an advancing point twill with a run of five and a step of one would not be a broken twill if the sequence went 1-2-3-4-5-4-3-2-3-4-5-6-5-4-3-4-5-6-7-6-5-4...).  BTW - it's a lot easier to see this is graphic illustrations rather than in text.  If you have the January/February 2016 issue of Heddlecraft, you can see the images.

As far as Emery, it's not perfect . . . but, it is probably the best thing we have.  I believe weavers truly interested in rolling around in the mud on weave structures need to read it . . . and when I say read it, do more than look at the pictures.  When we can break down weave structures into plain weave, twill, and satin and then organize them by simple, compound elements, compound weaves . . . it helps distinguish what is going on in the weave and is a good place to start a discussion. This is when it becomes clear that a single two-tie threading woven as Summer & Winter is compound elements and Beiderwand is a compound weave.

Emery can be pushed to the point where it becomes muddy.  I often use as a particular four-shaft draft that can be interpreted as a simple weave or a compound weave depending on the yarns used and the sett.


Sally O
 

Thanks Robyn, Su, and to Deb C for her private response.

I would love to see more "theory" sessions / discussion at conferences (or virtually) on this topic in the future. I know there have been some presented in the past, but it is a topic that bears repeating, as different presenters may resonate in different ways.