nancy asks


nancy
 

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving.  now, like rest of you, i am couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving.  can i dye cotton roving???  i am not youtube facile but i tried looking there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california


personjune
 

Nancy, it requires a mordant...Google it, lots of info
Good luck and have fun!
June

On ‎Saturday‎, ‎March‎ ‎21‎, ‎2020‎ ‎11‎:‎33‎:‎15‎ ‎AM‎ ‎PDT, nancy <biggins@...> wrote:


good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have
never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving.  now, like rest of you, i am
couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving. 
can i dye cotton roving???  i am not youtube facile but i tried looking
there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california




Louise Yale
 

Dharma in Marin County used to have instructions for using procion dyes on
their web site.
Your neighbor Louise in NorCal

Nancy, it requires a mordant...Google it, lots of infoGood luck and have
fun!June
On ‎Saturday‎, ‎March‎ ‎21‎, ‎2020‎
‎11‎:‎33‎:‎15‎ ‎AM‎ ‎PDT, nancy
<biggins@pacific.net> wrote:

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have
never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving.  now, like rest of you, i am
couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving. 
can i dye cotton roving???  i am not youtube facile but i tried looking
there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california








Silvia Leidig, MSW
 

Look at Joan Ruane’s website too. I think it’s something like cottonspinning.com. She used to have instructions for dyeing cotton roving.
On Mar 21, 2020, at 11:33 AM, nancy <biggins@pacific.net> wrote:
good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving. now, like rest of you, i am couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving. can i dye cotton roving??? i am not youtube facile but i tried looking there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california


nancy
 

thanks louise, i have printed pages from dharma over the years. i did not see there but maybe i will look again

On 3/21/20 11:43 AM, Louise Yale wrote:
Dharma in Marin County used to have instructions for using procion dyes on
their web site.
Your neighbor Louise in NorCal

Nancy, it requires a mordant...Google it, lots of infoGood luck and have
fun!June
On ‎Saturday‎, ‎March‎ ‎21‎, ‎2020‎
‎11‎:‎33‎:‎15‎ ‎AM‎ ‎PDT, nancy
<biggins@pacific.net> wrote:

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have
never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving.  now, like rest of you, i am
couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving.Â
can i dye cotton roving???  i am not youtube facile but i tried looking
there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california









Neal Goman
 

Yes you can dye cotton. I have used Procion MX and Sabraset but any fiber reactive dye would work. With wool you used Citric acid or vinegar but with cellulose use Soda Ash solution. Unlike wool you don't need heat. Pro Chemical and Dye has some good write ups.
Neal.

On 3/21/2020 1:33 PM, nancy wrote:
good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving.  now, like rest of you, i am couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving.  can i dye cotton roving???  i am not youtube facile but i tried looking there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california



Deanna Johnson
 

Here are links to 2 of Joan Ruane’s videos about dying cotton fiber.

http://www.cottonspinning.com/spin/dyeCushing_Solar.html

Deanna Johnson



On Mar 21, 2020, at 11:33 AM, nancy <biggins@...> wrote:

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving.  now, like rest of you, i am couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving.  can i dye cotton roving???  i am not youtube facile but i tried looking there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california






Mandi Ballard
 

I have been dyeing cotton for 20+ years. There are two excellent sources for dyes and dye instructions.

DharmaTrading in California

And ProChemical in Mass. 

  ---Mandi

On Sat, Mar 21, 2020 at 2:01 PM Deanna Johnson <deannaj@...> wrote:
Here are links to 2 of Joan Ruane’s videos about dying cotton fiber.

http://www.cottonspinning.com/spin/dyeCushing_Solar.html

Deanna Johnson



On Mar 21, 2020, at 11:33 AM, nancy <biggins@...> wrote:

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving.  now, like rest of you, i am couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving.  can i dye cotton roving???  i am not youtube facile but i tried looking there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california






Ian Bowers
 

Cotton fibres, cellulose, has far fewer sites on the cotton molecule for dyes to bind, compared with wool (protein). Using naturally occurring dyestuffs requires an assistant to create more binding sites. Traditionally alternate soaks in potash alum followed by tannin repeated several times created the necessary structure. However it did leave a brown tint which affected the final dye colour. A more recent assistant is aluminium tri-acetate. Unfortunately there are three isomers of the acetate, mono- di- and tri-acetate. Only the latter, and most expensive form is soluble and can be used as the assistant. Some dye suppliers have not understood this subtlety and sell the cheaper variants; beware.

Using synthetic dyes is far easier; fibre reactive dyes are cold water dyes requiring the addition of sodium carbonate to create the necessary alkalinity. They are widely available and commonly used industrially for colouring papers. They are generally sold as mixes to create the necessary colour, and the mix components can 'strike' at different rates. The dyes also hydrolise in the dye bath so, unlike the acid dye family, they are not 100% absorbed; there is always some colour in the dye bath, and a need too wash the dyes article thoroughly to remove unattached dyestuffs. As a result it is important to enter the fabric to the dye bath as soon as possible after it is formed and work the fabric thoroughly to ensure even spread and absorption of the dyestuff.

Best regards
 
Ian Bowers (Dr)
Managing Director
 
www.georgeweil.com
GEORGE WEIL & SONS LTD, Old Portsmouth Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 1LZ
tel: 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax: 0 (+44) 1483 565807

George Weil & Sons is a limited company registered in England and Wales.
Registered number 00321890. Registered office: Peasmarsh, Guildford, GU3 1LZ 
Follow George Weil:
__________________________________________________________

If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender and delete the message

-----Original Message-----
From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of nancy via Groups.Io
Sent: 21 March 2020 18:47
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] nancy asks

thanks louise, i have printed pages from dharma over the years. i did not see there but maybe i will look again

On 3/21/20 11:43 AM, Louise Yale wrote:
Dharma in Marin County used to have instructions for using procion
dyes on their web site.
Your neighbor Louise in NorCal

Nancy, it requires a mordant...Google it, lots of infoGood luck and
have fun!June
On ‎Saturday‎, ‎March‎ ‎21‎, ‎2020‎
‎11‎:‎33‎:‎15‎ ‎AM‎ ‎PDT, nancy
<biggins@pacific.net> wrote:

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have
never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving.  now, like rest of you, i
am couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton
roving. can i dye cotton roving???  i am not youtube facile but i
tried looking there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california










Subu
 

Hello Nancy...yes you can. I just dyed a few pounds of cotton linter for a spinner friend. It is not hard at all. I would suggest doing full immersion dyeing, not trying to paint it on. Soak your roving in soda ash water before dyeing. You can then dye it wet or dry, but wet usually works better, imho. Use very warm water in your dyebath and let it batch for a minimum of 4 hours, preferably 8 or more. Rinsing will yield run off - there is really not much of a way to avoid this dyeing cotton. Remember cotton will not dye as "brilliantly" as wool or silk. But you can get good saturated color. It will get darker when spun, so think of that when choosing colors. Have fun - you've got nothing to lose!

Best,
Su Butler



--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Michelle
 

Nancy - look at their Proccion dyes that are usually used for tie dying - I buy them for t-shirts but they will work well for any cotton. You need the dye, some urea and some soda ash and you can dye to your hearts content.

Michelle in ND where we are still seeing only a few cases!

-----Original Message-----
From: weavetech@groups.io [mailto:weavetech@groups.io] On Behalf Of nancy
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2020 1:47 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] nancy asks

thanks louise, i have printed pages from dharma over the years. i did
not see there but maybe i will look again

On 3/21/20 11:43 AM, Louise Yale wrote:
Dharma in Marin County used to have instructions for using procion dyes on
their web site.
Your neighbor Louise in NorCal

Nancy, it requires a mordant...Google it, lots of infoGood luck and have
fun!June
On ‎Saturday‎, ‎March‎ ‎21‎, ‎2020‎
‎11‎:‎33‎:‎15‎ ‎AM‎ ‎PDT, nancy
<biggins@pacific.net> wrote:

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have
never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving. now, like rest of you, i am
couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving.Â
can i dye cotton roving??? i am not youtube facile but i tried looking
there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california










marmar weaves
 

Not THE cotton spinning expert, but the staple is soooo short that I would spin it first before you dye it. Cotton has waxes that interfere with color takeup unless it is hot enough to melt those waxes.
I have happily dyed cotton yarn. But this it will ness up roving to do all that squeezing and manipulating. . Talk to Dharma if they are at work. They tell much online. But, no, I would not try to dye roving. But that is just my own reasoning.
Glad to here from elders or betters.
MarMar in middle TN. where water is still standing in yards at top of Hills & Flowers are blooming. (Yes, there are many people still driving around going places like there invincible, a life was still normal)

On Mar 21, 2020, at 1:33 PM, nancy <biggins@pacific.net> wrote:

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving. now, like rest of you, i am couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving. can i dye cotton roving???


Louise Yale
 

How I am dyeing cotton - fabric, yarn and roving.

With the soda ash prepared product, outside, in a sheltered, windfree
spot, on plastic wrap, with a respirator in place*, I sprinkle the dry
Procion dye on the product.

The Procion dyes spread by themselves throughout the product.

No, it is not even like an immersion process but the slight variation adds
depth, drama and complexity to the product.

Roll up the product in the plastic warp. Place in a plastic bag to keep it
moist. Store for one week in 70 degree or higher spot in the house.

Rinse as needed.

*alone, no pets, no children.

Louise in Norcal

--------

Not THE cotton spinning expert, but the staple is soooo short that I would
spin it first before you dye it. Cotton has waxes that interfere with
color takeup unless it is hot enough to melt those waxes.
I have happily dyed cotton yarn. But this it will ness up roving to do all
that squeezing and manipulating. . Talk to Dharma if they are at work.
They tell much online. But, no, I would not try to dye roving. But that is
just my own reasoning.
Glad to here from elders or betters.
MarMar in middle TN. where water is still standing in yards at top of
Hills & Flowers are blooming. (Yes, there are many people still driving
around going places like there invincible, a life was still normal)


On Mar 21, 2020, at 1:33 PM, nancy <biggins@pacific.net> wrote:

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have
never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving. now, like rest of you, i am
couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving.
can i dye cotton roving???




Denise
 

Nancy, for best results, you will want to mordant your cotton with aluminum acetate and then dip it into a chalk or wheat-germ bath. Maiwa Textiles near Vancouver is a wonderful supplier of natural dyes and has a free download with excellent instructions on how to succeed with them. Go to Maiwa.com, then click on "Natural Dyes," then click on the first link "About Natural Dyes." At the end of the third paragraph, there is a link to this guide, a downloadable PDF called "Natural Dye Info Sheet." 

Please share photos of your results with the group! We all need color these days ;o)

Regards,
Denise Kovnat
www.denisekovnat.com


Pat Bullen
 

My experience dyeing cotton roving depends on the thickness of the roving.
Manipulating it through all the rinsing is a challenge.  I use mesh sweater bags
and baste/sew the bag like a donut - smaller circle/oval in the middle of the roving
and another 1" or 2" outside the roving.  With enough room between the center and 
outer circles, the roving has some room to move around but not so much room to fall
apart. This also makes it easier to move the roving in/out of the dye/water and makes
it easier to rinse.  I spin out all my cotton in a top loading machine - DO NOT ALLOW
IT TO AGITATE.  JUST SPIN.  For thin roving I make smaller bundles and divide the 
sweater bag into smaller quadrants.

The soda ash will kill the dye.  Move the roving around a lot in the first 2-3 hours for more 
even color.  I let the roving sit overnight (which can create darker color on the bottom).  
Don't rinse out the soda ash before testing an area to see if it is dark enough.  If it isn't, 
change the water, add more soda ash, and redye it  -- again moving it around a lot in the 
first 2-3 hours.  If you add too much dye, the dye binds to the water instead of the
fiber.  You are better to add more dye in stages than add a lot of dye up front hoping
to get a darker shade.  

I also agree that it is MUCH easier to dye yarn than fiber.
Paula Burch at pchurch.net offers a ton of good advice about
dyeing anything you might ever want to dye.


Lorelei Caracausa
 

My suggestion on dyeing cotton sliver, or any roving for that matter, is to chain it first.  This allows for a more controlled "package" in the dye pot.

Lorelei

On Sat, Mar 21, 2020, 5:23 PM Pat Bullen <spinningwitch24@...> wrote:
My experience dyeing cotton roving depends on the thickness of the roving.
Manipulating it through all the rinsing is a challenge.  I use mesh sweater bags
and baste/sew the bag like a donut - smaller circle/oval in the middle of the roving
and another 1" or 2" outside the roving.  With enough room between the center and 
outer circles, the roving has some room to move around but not so much room to fall
apart. This also makes it easier to move the roving in/out of the dye/water and makes
it easier to rinse.  I spin out all my cotton in a top loading machine - DO NOT ALLOW
IT TO AGITATE.  JUST SPIN.  For thin roving I make smaller bundles and divide the 
sweater bag into smaller quadrants.

The soda ash will kill the dye.  Move the roving around a lot in the first 2-3 hours for more 
even color.  I let the roving sit overnight (which can create darker color on the bottom).  
Don't rinse out the soda ash before testing an area to see if it is dark enough.  If it isn't, 
change the water, add more soda ash, and redye it  -- again moving it around a lot in the 
first 2-3 hours.  If you add too much dye, the dye binds to the water instead of the
fiber.  You are better to add more dye in stages than add a lot of dye up front hoping
to get a darker shade.  

I also agree that it is MUCH easier to dye yarn than fiber.
Paula Burch at pchurch.net offers a ton of good advice about
dyeing anything you might ever want to dye.


Ian Bowers
 

Why, oh why, does the craft ‘industry’ insist on adding ‘magic’ to all their procedures, to the point that some craft suppliers are the worst examples.

 

Be assured that the industrial processes for dyeing with fibre reactive dyes , the same family and often exactly the same ones as the craft industry uses, does not use any other ingredients than soda ash and the dyestuff. 

 

Aluminium acetate works well when using naturally occurring dyestuffs, but no other routine is necessary (unless you are a supplier hoping to increase turn-over by adding non-harmful sales). 

 

Best regards

 

Ian Bowers (Dr)

Managing Director

 

www.georgeweil.com

GEORGE WEIL & SONS LTD, Old Portsmouth Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 1LZ

tel: 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax: 0 (+44) 1483 565807

George Weil & Sons is a limited company registered in England and Wales.
Registered number 00321890. Registered office: Peasmarsh, Guildford, GU3 1LZ 

Follow George Weil: visit Twitter.comvisit Facebook.comsee our Blog
__________________________________________________________

If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender and delete the message

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Denise via Groups.Io
Sent: 21 March 2020 21:27
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] nancy asks

 

Nancy, for best results, you will want to mordant your cotton with aluminum acetate and then dip it into a chalk or wheat-germ bath. Maiwa Textiles near Vancouver is a wonderful supplier of natural dyes and has a free download with excellent instructions on how to succeed with them. Go to Maiwa.com, then click on "Natural Dyes," then click on the first link "About Natural Dyes." At the end of the third paragraph, there is a link to this guide, a downloadable PDF called "Natural Dye Info Sheet." 

Please share photos of your results with the group! We all need color these days ;o)

Regards,
Denise Kovnat
www.denisekovnat.com


margcoe
 

Ian, you forgot salt in tub / vat dyeing:

 In immersion dyeing (bucket or washing machine dyeing) cellulose fibers or silk, using fiber reactive dyes such as Procion MX or Sabracron F, salt is important in helping to drive the dye out of the vast amount of water (which is necessary for smooth, even, unstreaked dyeing) onto the fiber.”

Sent from iDevice
coeweaves.com
e-weave-online.thinkific.com

On Mar 22, 2020, at 1:18 AM, Ian Bowers <md@...> wrote:



Why, oh why, does the craft ‘industry’ insist on adding ‘magic’ to all their procedures, to the point that some craft suppliers are the worst examples.

 

Be assured that the industrial processes for dyeing with fibre reactive dyes , the same family and often exactly the same ones as the craft industry uses, does not use any other ingredients than soda ash and the dyestuff. 


Ian Bowers
 

It is arguable that it improves the final result.

 

Sodium ions from Sodium Sulphate or commons salt, Sodium Chloride, will block some of the dye sites and take time to shift, balancing out the distribution of dye over the surface of the fibres.  This is said to even the dye result.  However this is questionable when Sodium carbonate (Soda ash) is used as the alkaliser in the dye vat, since it is already contributing Sodium ions. 

 

More important is to ensure the cotton (fibre or yarn) is entered into the vat as soon as possible after it is created and worked well to ensure even spread of the dye throughout the material. 

 

Best regards

 

Ian Bowers (Dr)

Managing Director

 

www.georgeweil.com

GEORGE WEIL & SONS LTD, Old Portsmouth Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 1LZ

tel: 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax: 0 (+44) 1483 565807

George Weil & Sons is a limited company registered in England and Wales.
Registered number 00321890. Registered office: Peasmarsh, Guildford, GU3 1LZ 

Follow George Weil: visit Twitter.comvisit Facebook.comsee our Blog
__________________________________________________________

If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender and delete the message

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of margcoe via Groups.Io
Sent: 22 March 2020 17:12
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] nancy asks

 

Ian, you forgot salt in tub / vat dyeing:

 

 In immersion dyeing (bucket or washing machine dyeing) cellulose fibers or silk, using fiber reactive dyes such as Procion MX or Sabracron F, salt is important in helping to drive the dye out of the vast amount of water (which is necessary for smooth, even, unstreaked dyeing) onto the fiber.”

 

Sent from iDevice

coeweaves.com

e-weave-online.thinkific.com



On Mar 22, 2020, at 1:18 AM, Ian Bowers <md@...> wrote:



Why, oh why, does the craft ‘industry’ insist on adding ‘magic’ to all their procedures, to the point that some craft suppliers are the worst examples.

 

Be assured that the industrial processes for dyeing with fibre reactive dyes , the same family and often exactly the same ones as the craft industry uses, does not use any other ingredients than soda ash and the dyestuff. 


Sigrid Piroch <jacquardweaver@...>
 

I have been dying wool primarily with natural dyes since 1976 and have produced many lovely colors using the 5 basic mordants, and sometimes none and even many lichens by several methods. Experiment.

Dying with cotton has been done with procion dyes, but I learned that I should have have worn a mask because I developed an allergy using the powder. Colors are lovely but do wear a mask. Allergies may not be unusual.

Sigrid at ARTS

On Mar 21, 2020, at 4:36 PM, Louise Yale <cafeina@pacific.net> wrote:

How I am dyeing cotton - fabric, yarn and roving.

With the soda ash prepared product, outside, in a sheltered, windfree
spot, on plastic wrap, with a respirator in place*, I sprinkle the dry
Procion dye on the product.

The Procion dyes spread by themselves throughout the product.

No, it is not even like an immersion process but the slight variation adds
depth, drama and complexity to the product.

Roll up the product in the plastic warp. Place in a plastic bag to keep it
moist. Store for one week in 70 degree or higher spot in the house.

Rinse as needed.

*alone, no pets, no children.

Louise in Norcal

--------

Not THE cotton spinning expert, but the staple is soooo short that I would
spin it first before you dye it. Cotton has waxes that interfere with
color takeup unless it is hot enough to melt those waxes.
I have happily dyed cotton yarn. But this it will ness up roving to do all
that squeezing and manipulating. . Talk to Dharma if they are at work.
They tell much online. But, no, I would not try to dye roving. But that is
just my own reasoning.
Glad to here from elders or betters.
MarMar in middle TN. where water is still standing in yards at top of
Hills & Flowers are blooming. (Yes, there are many people still driving
around going places like there invincible, a life was still normal)


On Mar 21, 2020, at 1:33 PM, nancy <biggins@pacific.net> wrote:
good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have
never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving. now, like rest of you, i am
couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving.
can i dye cotton roving???