Wormy Chenille


bigwhitesofadog
 

I know that rayon chenille has to be treated carefully to make sure
that it is captured securely by the weave structure or it will worm.
I have used cotton chenille a lot, and I have never had trouble with
it worming. I did a twill piece recently of cotton chenille and one
color wormed. It was all 1450 ypp from Brassard. The red was not
treated differently; same float length, all beamed on sectionally, the
red did not seem different during beaming or weaving. Has anyone had
any experiences like this? I used 8/4 cotton from Brassard as weft,
and beat fairly closely.
Sandra


Laura J. Fisher-Bonvallet
 

I have used 5/2 and 10/2 mercerized cotton warp sett at 16 and 20 epi respectively. I use 1350 rayon chenille weft in complex twill weave structures. I have never had worming.

www.LauraFisherBonvallet.com

On Dec 3, 2019, at 4:08 PM, bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@gmail.com> wrote:

I know that rayon chenille has to be treated carefully to make sure
that it is captured securely by the weave structure or it will worm.
I have used cotton chenille a lot, and I have never had trouble with
it worming. I did a twill piece recently of cotton chenille and one
color wormed. It was all 1450 ypp from Brassard. The red was not
treated differently; same float length, all beamed on sectionally, the
red did not seem different during beaming or weaving. Has anyone had
any experiences like this? I used 8/4 cotton from Brassard as weft,
and beat fairly closely.
Sandra



Laura J. Fisher-Bonvallet
 

Forgot to mention...no floats greater than 3 threads...

Laura Fisher-Bonvallet
Beauxchenes Fibre Arts
www.LauraFisherBonvallet.com

On Dec 3, 2019, at 4:49 PM, Laura J. Fisher-Bonvallet <ljfb@new.rr.com> wrote:

I have used 5/2 and 10/2 mercerized cotton warp sett at 16 and 20 epi respectively. I use 1350 rayon chenille weft in complex twill weave structures. I have never had worming.

www.LauraFisherBonvallet.com
On Dec 3, 2019, at 4:08 PM, bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@gmail.com> wrote:

I know that rayon chenille has to be treated carefully to make sure
that it is captured securely by the weave structure or it will worm.
I have used cotton chenille a lot, and I have never had trouble with
it worming. I did a twill piece recently of cotton chenille and one
color wormed. It was all 1450 ypp from Brassard. The red was not
treated differently; same float length, all beamed on sectionally, the
red did not seem different during beaming or weaving. Has anyone had
any experiences like this? I used 8/4 cotton from Brassard as weft,
and beat fairly closely.
Sandra





bigwhitesofadog
 

This is not rayon chenille, it is cotton, and used as warp. As I
mentioned, only one color wormed.
Sandra


Sharon Schulze
 

Back in the day when I was weaving chenille I often found that one color wormed more than others. It wasn’t exactly scientific or reliable, but your experience with the red resonates with my experience. One color was consistently a mess, others were perfectly fine. At that time someone suggested that different dyes might interact with the chenille.

Sharon

On Dec 4, 2019, at 2:36 PM, bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@gmail.com> wrote:

This is not rayon chenille, it is cotton, and used as warp. As I
mentioned, only one color wormed.
Sandra



Su Butler
 

I don't believe dye has anything to do with how chenille behaves. It is the core yarn that is responsible for most issue with chenille yarns, whether they are rayon or cotton or silk......the core yarns, at one point in time, were made of the same fiber as the pile. When this was the case, shrinkage and dimensional movement was pretty predictable. Then some wise person decided it would be OK to add one polyester to one of the core yarns. I am sure this was done for durability......there are over 100 kinds of chenille manufactured for all different purposes....occasionally some of all of it finds it way to our looms. We all know what happens when polyester and a natural fiber are subjected to environments where they shrink....the natural fiber does and the poly does not. This can cause worming issues. I suspect if you dig down deep and see what the core yarn is in your worming chenille you will find it is not the same fiber as the pile. Something to think about.

Su Butler


Sharon Schulze
 

That is such a satisfying answer! HAHA - I never liked the dye-makes-a-difference answer but I hadn’t heard anything else.
Thank you!
:-) Sharon

On Dec 4, 2019, at 3:16 PM, Su Butler <Teach2Weave@comcast.net> wrote:

I don't believe dye has anything to do with how chenille behaves. It is the core yarn that is responsible for most issue with chenille yarns, whether they are rayon or cotton or silk......the core yarns, at one point in time, were made of the same fiber as the pile. When this was the case, shrinkage and dimensional movement was pretty predictable. Then some wise person decided it would be OK to add one polyester to one of the core yarns. I am sure this was done for durability......there are over 100 kinds of chenille manufactured for all different purposes....occasionally some of all of it finds it way to our looms. We all know what happens when polyester and a natural fiber are subjected to environments where they shrink....the natural fiber does and the poly does not. This can cause worming issues. I suspect if you dig down deep and see what the core yarn is in your worming chenille you will find it is not the same fiber as the pile. Something to think about.

Su Butler





Amy N
 

I have had cotton chenille worm in the past.  Not all colors, but some.  Most of my cotton chenille is millend cones, so I can't be sure the original source.  I use 8/2 unmercerized cotton in the warp, with a sett of 24, and the only worming came with 4-end floats.

Amy


On Wed, Dec 4, 2019 at 1:37 PM bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@...> wrote:
This is not rayon chenille, it is cotton, and used as warp.  As I
mentioned, only one color wormed.
Sandra




Ro Spinelli
 

Thank you, Su Butler for your description , makes total sense. I have woven with Rayon Chenille for years . Mostly scarves and loose fitting garments and have never had one piece worm. My chenille has come from anywhere, and everywhere… yarn sales, garage sales webs halcyon , you name it. I have never had a piece worm. I have mainly only used plain weave, at 16-18 eps, but I have beat it to death! I beat these projects very hard, feels like a board on loom, but always has soften luxuriously when wet finished and dried. I have relied on color and weave, and work in the warps with color changes and rainbow colored warps to form interest to the pieces, with success. My relatives, are still wearing scarves I gave them many years ago, ( my test group), and the scarves still look and are wearing great. Best advice I got as a beginner weaver, years ago c, concerning Chenille….. “ Chenille is a different animal…… you have to weave it specifically to tame its attributes…. not like other yarn, it has a mind of its own…………… when in doubt, beat like hell! “ ha ha ha ha .
Thank you Su, for your explanation.
Ro Spinelli


Pat Bullen
 

Years ago, Ruth Lantz a guild member, was at a dinner engagement and her best friend was wearing
one of "It's A Ruth" handwoven business suit prototypes.  During the course of dinner, worms sprang out
all over the upper portion of her latest design.  She ended up having to hand reweave a different yarn into
everywhere the worms crawled out.  It made for levity for our meeting but cost her a lot of headache
and profit.  To this day I remember her mixed warps -- at least 30 colors and different yarns to create
marvelous fabrics.  Each garment was woven with a different color and each looked totally appropriate
to the design.  You had to look hard to realize they were all from the same warp.  Never had a problem
since with silk or cotton chenille, but acrylic and rayon needs sett very close and pack the hell out of it.


bigwhitesofadog
 

Su, a different core had occured to me. I did a burn test on all four
colors, and all burned completely to black ash. However, it could be
rayon as well as cotton to do that I will take the yarns apart to see
what the cores are.