overhead beaters....


Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I have two looms with overhead beaters and two that
are underslung. ........ You do have
to push them back.
Well..... As I mentioned, if you move the pivots so they're behind the
beater swords, the balance then dictates that the beater will have to hang
toward the shafts. The beater's balance is from its pivots and if they're in
the middle of the swords, then the beater hangs plumb; if the pivots are
slightly in front of the swords, the beater rests against the fell, if the
pivots are behind the swords ( looking from the bench ) the beater hangs
close to the shafts.
If you have a loom with a small weaving area or "Sweet Spot", then you're
restrained by the design and moving the pivots could result in a reed that
isn't vertical ( 90 degrees ) when it strikes the fell line. In this case
the loom design dictates to you, so all you can do here is add a stretchy
cord to each sword of the beater.
Loom design has to take everything into consideration; change one thing and
it changes another......

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

Hi Joan,
Sketch enclosed.
More to follow -

- Bill Koepp in Central California

I'm not familiar with the two terms, beater swords and Capes.
The loom I'm referring to is an AVL production dobby. That particular
loom had a lever that you could drop down to hold the beater
back; otherwise it had to be held back by hand. I'm asking this question
as a part of my research for my future dream loom. I like the overheads
but want it to stay back by itself.

What is it that you like about this type of beater?
Is it true that rugs are easier to beat with them?

In your picture it looks like the hanging beater is defying gravity.


Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I'm not familiar with the two terms, beater swords and Capes.
Contact me offlist so I can send attachments please.

- Bill Koepp in Central California


Joan Swift <joanes@...>
 

As I mentioned, if you move the pivots so they're behind the
beater swords, the balance then dictates that the beater will have to
hang toward the shafts
Bill,
I'm not familiar with the two terms, beater swords and Capes.
The loom I'm referring to is an AVL production dobby. That particular
loom had a lever that you could drop down to hold the beater
back; otherwise it had to be held back by hand. I'm asking this question
as a part of my research for my future dream loom. I like the overheads
but want it to stay back by itself.

What is it that you like about this type of beater?
Is it true that rugs are easier to beat with them?

In your picture it looks like the hanging beater is defying gravity.

Thanks,
Joan


Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

What is it that you like about this type of beater?
Is it true that rugs are easier to beat with them?
In your picture it looks like the hanging beater is defying gravity.
I do like the overhead beater !
The only advantage an underslung beater has is size; it's smaller. It's
usually used to make the loom more portable or smaller in my opinion, as
there's no high castle.
To tune the overhead beater, you can move the pivot piece from the front of
the pivot bar to the rear or the reverse.The pivot piece can be wedge or
chisel shaped. You can also move a steel bar from the rear to the front;
all of these will change the hang angle of the beater. Usually the overhead
beater has a larger swing arc and returns to the start position by itself,
unlike most underslung beaters that have to be pushed back. I'd put a steel
bar on ANY beater, for rugs.
The last resort is adding an elastic cord to each sword ( side ) of the
beater. If your beater then rests too far for you to comfortably reach it,
just add a nice wooden handle to the front reed-cap or shell.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Elizabeth Silver-Schack <taze.moo@...>
 

What is it that you like about this type of beater?
Is it true that rugs are easier to beat with them?

I owned a Cranbrook made in 1991 which came with "arms" to hold the beater
back in place. The beater had a metal plate along its length for extra
weight when beating rugs. When pused to its rear position the magnets on the
"arms" which were attached to the side uprights of the loom would hold the
beam back. I found this useful when I was working on rep rugs, for example,
and had the warp at extremely high tension with lots of epi-
perhaps you can device a system of this sort for your dream loom,
Bettes

----- Original Message -----
From: "Joan Swift" <joanes@efn.org>
To: <WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2002 10:20 PM
Subject: Re: [WeaveTech] Re: overhead beaters....


As I mentioned, if you move the pivots so they're behind the
beater swords, the balance then dictates that the beater will have to
hang toward the shafts
Bill,
I'm not familiar with the two terms, beater swords and Capes.
The loom I'm referring to is an AVL production dobby. That particular
loom had a lever that you could drop down to hold the beater
back; otherwise it had to be held back by hand. I'm asking this question
as a part of my research for my future dream loom. I like the overheads
but want it to stay back by itself.

What is it that you like about this type of beater?
Is it true that rugs are easier to beat with them?

In your picture it looks like the hanging beater is defying gravity.

Thanks,
Joan



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Su Butler <apbutler@...>
 

The only advantage an underslung beater has is size; it's smaller. >It's
usually used to make the loom more portable or smaller in my
opinion, as there's no high castle.
I fully respect Bill's knowledge of different looms, but I must disagree
with the above......the underslung beater on some looms is a matter of
choice for the weaver....my CM loom has an underslung beater which is
exactly the same size as the overhead beaters on this brand loom, and I love
it, but also a high castle and is not what I could call portable. The
castle houses the (what are they really called??) jacks from which the
shafts hang. I like the underslung beater because is does go to a resting
position so I do not have to push it aside to throw the shuttle, and I like
the weight of it....I hardly have to pull on it at all to get a good firm
beat.
I do believe underslung beaters are used on American made jack action
looms to help with the size issue.....those looms are more compact in total,
but on a Scandinavian style CM loom, I believe it a matter of taste.....

Su Butler :-) www.subudesigns.com
"Ask not that events should happen as you will, but let your will be that
events should happen as they do, and you shall have peace." - Epictetus


Therese <cabincrk@...>
 

The
castle houses the (what are they really called??) jacks from which the
shafts hang.
Coupers, I think.

Therese