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Re: exhibiting textiles

Sally O
 

Kati,

Possibly another opportunity for exploration:

The Professional Weaver's Society is a newly formed group and they are offering their first roundtable discussion on Oct 22, 7 pm eastern "The Value of Textiles." Look at the descriptions of the panelists and see if you think the content might be of interest?

https://professionalweaversociety.org/roundtable/?mc_cid=9bd8b88ecf&mc_eid=9cd96ac3f4


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Matt Eardley
 

I think it’s good to point out that this discussion applies to any fiber at all. This may be paranoid, but I am suspicious of anything that I didn’t buy new from a trusted supplier. Not to say I would trash anything else; it’s easy to test whether a yarn works for a certain purpose, and find some other way to use it if it doesn’t. 


Matt in California


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

ingerseitz
 

Just do that snap test as someone suggested.  Also it is the black dye that is the problem.  
In NM you have to worry about moths.  If you start winding your wool warp and discover it has breaks in it, then it is most likely moths that has gotten the yarn.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "beadermaybe via groups.io" <beadermaybe@...>
Date: 10/20/20 1:47 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Cotton Yarn breaking

After reading about old cotton yarn, I’m wondering if old wool warp does the same?  Do it become more brittle and break?  I bought two come of old wool warp from the husband of a woman who had passed about 15 years ago. I’d hate to go through all that work to warp my loom o lot to have the strings break.
Carmen in New Mexico






Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

beadermaybe
 

After reading about old cotton yarn, I’m wondering if old wool warp does the same? Do it become more brittle and break? I bought two come of old wool warp from the husband of a woman who had passed about 15 years ago. I’d hate to go through all that work to warp my loom o lot to have the strings break.
Carmen in New Mexico


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Ian Bowers
 

I think some of the issues around black yarn are hinted at by earlier contributors; remaindered yarns.  Fabric is commissioned (commercially), the weaver will buy more than enough yarn to complete the commission, he doesn’t want to run short before the job is completed.  He will also price in the total yarn bought to the price for the fabric woven.  There will always be some yarn left over which is fully paid for and this is then sold on to remainder yarn dealers at very low cost to get it off the premises. 

 

Buying cheap yarn is almost always buying remaindered yarn, and this may well have been redyed to make it sellable (eg purple is not easy to sell, black is).  So, cheap, black yarn is overdyed remaindered yarn, and at risk of failing at some point. 

 

The advice is always to recognize the risk in buying cheap yarn from resellers, and if black is important, buy virgin yarn from a reputable seller, and pay the price, after all the cost of yarn is generally less than the labour cost of designing, setting up the loom, weaving, finishing, marketing and admin behind all the work. 

 

Best regards

 

Ian Bowers (Dr)

Managing Director

 

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From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Carol Irving via groups.io
Sent: 20 October 2020 14:22
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Cotton Yarn breaking

 

Marie, very good advice! I have some older yarns in my inventory and I should be doing this going forward. I know many Weavers choose black Weft yarn to make their warp colors Pop!

 

Of concern is buying brand new black yarn and trusting that this yarn won't deteriorate over time whether on the shelf or when used.

 

Thanks for everyone's input.

Carol Irving


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Carol Irving
 

Marie, very good advice! I have some older yarns in my inventory and I should be doing this going forward. I know many Weavers choose black Weft yarn to make their warp colors Pop!

Of concern is buying brand new black yarn and trusting that this yarn won't deteriorate over time whether on the shelf or when used.

Thanks for everyone's input.
Carol Irving


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

kathyo
 

Thank You.

kathyo

On Oct 19, 2020, at 2:29 PM, Lorelei
All of my 20/2 has a discernible "snap" and certainly does not pull apart easily


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Marie Kulchinski
 

15 yeast ago, I went to the closing of Coaks & Clarks mill warehouse.  We were able to fill a van full of wonderful yarn.  We were prohibited from touching a set of pallets of black yarn that had been rejected because of breakage.  We were told they were going to be destroyed.  So, manufacturer's were aware of the problem.  How many tons of different size yarn were produced?  That is an unknown amount.  What the distribution of the yarn under what label is another question that can not be easily address today.

If you have black yarn, either skein or wind a warp then wash it.  Hang to dry and put the skein or warp under tension.  If it is going to break, it will now.

I love black yarn but I am very careful about buying it.

Marie 


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Pat Bullen
 

At the center where I used to teach, we had a run of black unmercerized and some mercerized disintegrate.  Two cones were less than a year old.  Supreme replaced them explaining that black is a really hard color to get and the chemistry, if off a bit, can weaken the yarn.  I marked the cones weft only but no one trusted them and eventually we gave them away with a warning attached.  This was 3 or 4 years before Supreme changed hands.


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Lorelei Caracausa
 

All of my 20/2 has a discernible "snap" and certainly does not pull apart easily


On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 1:24 PM kathyo <kathyanneolson@...> wrote:
How much snap should non-mercerized 20/2 cotton have? I have some millends and they seem tender, but I’m used to 8/2 that seems super strong...

I’ve not used 20/2 before.., 

kathyo



--
Lorelei


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

kathyo
 

How much snap should non-mercerized 20/2 cotton have? I have some millends and they seem tender, but I’m used to 8/2 that seems super strong...

I’ve not used 20/2 before.., 

kathyo


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Subu
 

Somewhere in this thread someone asked about using weaker yarn as weft….please don’t do it.  I once purchased a handwoven towel for $45.00, and the first time I washed it the towel fell completely apart.  I contacted the weaver who created it and she would take no responsibility for it.  So I was out $45.00, left feeling a bit taken advantage of by the weaver and had no towel.  If you want to keep your good reputation, don’t use inferior materials that your customer will pay the price for.

 

Su Butler 😊

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: exhibiting textiles

Sally O
 

Kati,

I have not seen a universal document, but I think this topic was touched upon during HGA's Spinning & Weaving Week panel talk presented Monday, Oct 6, "Submitting & Being Accepted into Exhibition: Tips & Tricks". The virtual presentation was streamed live and you can still watch it until the end of October. (Check the website or the HGA facebook page.) One the panelists talked about how her 3-D items (fiber art sculpture) are sometimes displayed upside down, for instance. Another shared how a curator helped her change her display method to prevent damage to the work. A third panelist mentioned going to shows and looking at the different ways folks suspend their work for ideas.

My takeaway is that each exhibit venue probably has its own criteria and limitations in regards to exhibition space, so your best bet is to confer with the coordinator, curator, or venue first. Variables might be determined by the selection of items curated in - the space in a smaller gallery may only accommodate x-number of items needing pedestals, for instance. Exhibition budget also plays a factor - major venues might have more flexibility, staff, and resources to consider more elaborate staging of 3-D works (although everyone is hurting in this regard due to Covid.)

The best bet is to photograph the item and armature exactly as it would appear in a gallery or museum setting, with a clean, uncluttered background. You might want to describe the additional support pieces being sent with the work. This would facilite a conversation with the hosting venue or coordinator. They might be able to provide display alternatives.

If the piece is to be suspended in some way, I would especially confer with the coordinator or hosting site - some have very high ceilings that would make suspending an item difficult to impossible. Temporary walls might also prove to be a barrier to securely suspending a piece with significant weight. There can be potential insurance/safety issues with items that are suspended - think of a visitor accidentally walking into it.

I, too, would love to see more 3-D fiber art exhibited in a variety of venues, and kudos to the exhibition coordinators who try their best to accommodate us.


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Doreen McLaughlin
 

            I long ago stopped trusting yarn to not have knots, tensile strength, or bad spots, regardless of if it is packaged on cones, balls, or skeins.

            When I am going to use a yarn, I always wind it into a cake on a jumbo winder. For example, as I prepared to weave single-color satin dishtowels, I wound off one unmarked cone of autumn red that had a wraps per inch similar to 16/2 cotton. From one cone, I had 25 individual cakes of yarn due to knots and breaks at bad spots. Yes, I did have breaks while weaving, 95% at the floating selvages, 5% in random spots. I learned how to deal with a broken warp end. All my weaving is used by family or given as gifts, not sold.

            As an incentive when I know I will be winding off cones, I binge watch Japanese anime.

            I do not throw away yarn until it’s too small to use to secure bouts. Yarn with knots in it is useful for the guide yarn on warping boards/reels and as dummy warps.

Doreen


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Jayne F
 

Sally, You beat me to it! I’ve also had bad 5/2.  Currently, I have a nasty black cone of 8/2 saved to show and let new weavers test. It comes apart with a soft poof instead of a hearty snap. The looks of surprise are priceless!

Jayne

 

 

From: weavetech@groups.io [mailto:weavetech@groups.io] On Behalf Of Sally O
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2020 11:39 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Cotton Yarn breaking

 

I, too, have some vintage 5/2 black UKI pearl cotton that was "falling" apart. I keep the cone to share with folks when I do my "Yarn Sleuth - Identifying that Mystery Yarn" presentation so they can experience the signs of disintegrating yarn. Otherwise, I would toss it. Removing if from the yarn stream ensures some unsuspecting weaver doesn't end up using it to great disappointment.

The characteristics of my disintegrating cone: when I run my fingernail along a length of the yarn (while under tension), lots of fibers are easily scraped off. I also wind bobbins under tension, using a piece of leather, and a clear sign was the tremendous amount of dust that suddenly appeared. When gently pulling on a piece of this yarn, it easily comes apart and the ends are soft, not crisp.

The cone and color looked great, and other cones from the same supply (an estate sale) were just fine.


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Sally O
 

I, too, have some vintage 5/2 black UKI pearl cotton that was "falling" apart. I keep the cone to share with folks when I do my "Yarn Sleuth - Identifying that Mystery Yarn" presentation so they can experience the signs of disintegrating yarn. Otherwise, I would toss it. Removing if from the yarn stream ensures some unsuspecting weaver doesn't end up using it to great disappointment.

The characteristics of my disintegrating cone: when I run my fingernail along a length of the yarn (while under tension), lots of fibers are easily scraped off. I also wind bobbins under tension, using a piece of leather, and a clear sign was the tremendous amount of dust that suddenly appeared. When gently pulling on a piece of this yarn, it easily comes apart and the ends are soft, not crisp.

The cone and color looked great, and other cones from the same supply (an estate sale) were just fine.


exhibiting textiles

Kati Meek
 

Does anyone have a source of guidelines for galleries regarding accommodations for textiles submitted for jury and exhibit?  
      There always seems to be space along the walls to prop framed pieces and tables for statuary, but no allowance for a carefully arranged textile on an armature or found item that needs to be hung up.  It seems important to submit textile work to help spread the notion that textiles are a legitimate medium for artistic expression, but I'm getting pretty discouraged.  Hoping for help, Kati

Kati Meek
Treehouse Studio
Alpena on the 45th


Re: Black Yarn breaking

Kati Meek
 

Your reports of weak black yarn quality are all too familiar.  I was told that often black yarns are over-dyed failures of other colors and the double/triple/whatever dye baths are the culprit. I had a disaster with black linen from Sweden on virgin though old spools.  When used as weft it was fine until the first washing when it disintegrated as though it were cheap paper leaving the warp in festoons, Guess the moral is 'weaver beware'.  Kati who is weaving thistle designs on the drawloom and threading them up on the Toika 24  
Kati Meek
Treehouse Studio
Alpena on the 45th


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

ingerseitz
 

I also just reasently had one cone of UKI, 5/2 in black that was braking after I used it as weft in overshot towel weave.  I didn't discover how brittle it was until I had already woven most of the towel.  I checked my other black cones and they were fine.
These cones were at least 10 years old.  Strange that some are rotten and others not!?



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Sarah Saulson <sarahsaulson@...>
Date: 10/19/20 9:30 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Cotton Yarn breaking

Hi Carol, When I used to teach weaving at a university, I received many yarn donations.  I gradually learned to check each cone carefully for dry rot, which causes yarn to disintegrate, even though you can’t see much evidence of damage.  I wonder if this might be the problem with your 5/2 yarn.  If you use the yarn for warp, it might be risky, as it might break once it is under tension on the loom.

Good luck with your yarn and hope it is salvageable.

Sarah Saulson

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Cotton Yarn breaking

Sarah Saulson
 

Hi Carol, When I used to teach weaving at a university, I received many yarn donations.  I gradually learned to check each cone carefully for dry rot, which causes yarn to disintegrate, even though you can’t see much evidence of damage.  I wonder if this might be the problem with your 5/2 yarn.  If you use the yarn for warp, it might be risky, as it might break once it is under tension on the loom.

Good luck with your yarn and hope it is salvageable.

Sarah Saulson

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10