Date   

Re: UK trip help needed; V&A...

Weaver's Croft <wevrscroft@...>
 

good. will do.
thanks. susan

----- Original Message -----

The V&A is the Victoria & Albert museum. If you want to see their textile
collections and costume collections, plan for a whole day there. It's
just
a wonderful, wonderful place.

Ruth


Re: UK trip help needed; V&A...

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

The V&A is the Victoria & Albert museum. If you want to see their textile collections and costume collections, plan for a whole day there. It's just a wonderful, wonderful place.

Ruth


Re: Bill's Website....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I would love to be able to do that but I have to master my 4 harness first...>
Well, the 4 harness loom is a wonderful tool; there's so many weaves to do
and then you can attach one of the shaft switching devices onto it and -
Taa Daa ! You have a loom with 80 or 100 blocks of design !
I do mostly shaft switching or Summer & Winter multi-shaft symmetrical
designs. Weaving is fun, learning is fun; you'll never learn it all, just
keep having fun !

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


UK trip help needed; V&A...

Weaver's Croft <wevrscroft@...>
 

start with the V&A, and also try the Geffrye Museum, and buy a copy of
Crafts magazine
Ian Bowers
thanks ian, but what is the V&A, the geffrye museum is in london, yes? and
is about ?, and can the Crafts mag. be bought stateside?
oh, and i am not confined to London. will have the weekends and transport to
wherever i want to go so other destinations??
thanks again,
susan


Does anyone have an ORCO loom?

KarenInTheWoods <pfundt@...>
 

(sorry for cross posting, I put this on the Rugtalk list too)

HI,

I was just helping a newly addicted friend set up her new-to-her Oriental
Rug Loom.... 4H counterbalance. (she only paid $150 with a bunch of rag
shuttles, warping stuff and cones of warp) I have a question about the rope
friction brake system.. as it is slipping when we started weaving last
night.

It has a rope brake that is wrapped TWICE around the beam.. I am thinking
just a third wrap will help? How many times are they supposed to be
wrapped?

I have a plastic coated steel cable on my Harrisville which needs a
*wrapover* where one strand lays over the other to make it work, so we tried
that too, but didn't workl.

Any suggestons would be appreciated... poor gal was almost in tears cause it
kept slipping. Her brother wants to tear apart the loom and put a rachet
and pawl system on it, but the back beam has probably 50-75 yards of warp on
it that she wants to weave off first!

Any suggestions?

Weavingly Yours,
KarenInTheWoods
(try these links for weaving and family pics)
http://www.KarenInTheWoods.eboard.com
http://KarenInTheWoods.eboard.com


Re: storing reeds

Murphy, Alice <amurphy@...>
 

Have stored mine for years in a wooden umbrella stand and no warping
problem. Got some plastic bags that have a rust preventer impregnated in
the plastic to store them now and that eliminates one other problem.
Of course I also store lease sticks, warp stick in the stand as well.
Reeds range from 47 inchs to 16 inches. Maybe because I move them in
and out from time to time as weaving needs.
Alice in mo.

"Weavers get warped, and dulcimer players just fret!"


Re: Picture of V.Gravandar

Sharon Hinze <hinzewood@...>
 

Hi Sharon or anyone else with info;

Last summer I briefly had a funny little swedish-style loom with an overhead
beater pivoted behind wooden pegs and a spoon brake which also caught on
wooden pegs.
Well, from the brass plate on my loom, I'm sure Caroline was a weaver but I also got several reeds with this loom with the same label on them plus a name written in, Klein. My loom had been in storage since the '50's as the paper wrapped around some of the wooden pieces had the announcement of Marilyn Monroe's marriage to her first husband. Maybe they ordered and resold looms???? S

Sharon C. Hinze
Spokane, Washington 99203


Re: Gilmore looms

Deanna Baugh
 

d
I feel the same way. The one at school (about 45") had a very shallow shed
and the leverage on the treadles wasn't good-if I was weaving in sock feet
(shoes were too wide to fit on the treadles) my feet would slip off the
treadles. I had to go barefoot and still I had problems with leverage.
treadles on a gilmore can be tied higher or lower to suit the weaver, the problem with the shallow shed could be because of the floating harnesses. At high tension there is no weight to hold the harness down when you lift the shed. Schacht attached their harnesses to the lamns to help with this, norwood has the same problem as the gilmore especially if you put texolve heddles on it--again no weight.
Deanna

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Re: Avl Home Loom

Deanna Baugh
 

Anyone have any comments on this loom? Also what are the differences (other
than price) from the Avl Modular loom?
Thanks
Karen
A friend had this loom and it didn't work well for what she was weaving. She was doing chenille scarfs, close sett and high tension and had alot of trouble with the cords jumping off the pulleys. I understand it works well for other types of weaving, but she had trouble with what she did.
Deanna


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Re: Gilmore looms

Su Butler <apbutler@...>
 

*One* of the reasons I would shy away from a Gilmore for high tension
weaves is precisely this: The shed decreases with every increase in tension
on a jack loom....by the time one achieves the tension necessary to weave a
rug, the shafts are floating quite high and shed is so small it makes
weaving difficult and uncomfortable.....this is one of the many reasons to
consider a CM or CB loom for rugs.......
HOWEVER, for weaving which does not require such a high degree of tension,
when the treadles are properly tied, a very large shed (on my Gilmore I can
get a shed over 3" high) can be had on a Gilmore loom, which is one of the
reasons I suspect people love them so. The treadling is fairly light, even
with 6 or 7 shafts being lifted at once, although it will require more
effort than weaving on a CM or CB, as all jack looms do.
For slipping feet, take off the socks or apply sandpaper or rubber strips
to the treadles...or do as I do and weave in gymnastic shoes...a soft
slipper-like shoe with a rubber piece attached to the bottom which grips
treadles and eliminates any slipping.....perching yourself at the very edge
of your bench will increase the body weight available for depressing
treadles although frequent brakes will be necessary to keep circulation to
the legs......

Su Butler :-) apbutler@ync.net
'My mother said to me, "If you become a soldier, you'll be a general, if you
become a monk you'll end up as the pope." Instead, I became a painter and
wound up as Picasso.' - Pablo Picasso


Re: Digest Number 10

sigridpiroch@...
 

I probably should add to the last email that I also have an AVL SDL in my
ARTS STUDIO. So how could I forget that <g>?

As to wall storage, I use bankers boxes for anything bigger than a folder.
And I have 70 of them in this office alone. I used to sit one on top of
another but, you guessed it, the one/s I needed were always at the bottom &
the heavy ones ended on top... eventually breaking them down. So I had a
carpenter custom make me rough-hewn cedar bookcases to fit the room, 3 boxes
across & 7 high with a bit of room around each [almost to the ceiling] & 2
across x 7 high. I label the box ends using peel-off paper [half of an
81/2"x11"] run through the laserjet. His work cost only $250 & the cedar even
less so now I have 3 walls of boxes, each easily accessed, plus a run under
all the desks.

I didn't mention either the 80" round circular table in the center of my
office. It's a god-send. It just happened to be in this house when we bought
it. I keep all the odds & ends of projects going in small piles around it.
Again, easy access & fast turn-around. How better else to keep track of
thousands of pieces of paper & fabrics & folders, active & holding. I always
wanted a huge table to lay out projects & it is a great way to work. I've
even been known to clean it up once in awhile, like this week <G>.

It seems to me it takes more time to organize than to do the work just as it
takes more time to write up a project than to weave it! Good organizing &
good weaving. Sigrid at ARTS


Brakes 2

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I should expand a bit on the brake slippage; when looms are dis-assembled
and re-assembled it's quite easy to put the spring or weight on the wrong
end of the rope or strap. Some brakes use two springs, I'm talking only
about the major spring here.
If slippage occurs, try changing the direction of the rope or strap or
moving the major spring to the other rope connection. I won't try to say
clockwise, counter-clockwise etc., - If the major spring is on the rope end
that runs away from the weaver, move it to the rope end that runs toward the
weaver, or the other way around; some brake designs need it one way, some
the other way. If there's a brake release pedal, be sure it's adjusted so it
isn't allowing the brake to slip; the pedal cord shouldn't be banjo tight
when weaving.

If you ever have to move a loom, take plenty of photos first, they might
come in handy later !

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: upcoming UK trip help needed

Ian Bowers
 

start with the V&A, and also try the Geffrye Museum, and buy a copy of
Crafts magazine

but then I always say that


Best regards

Ian Bowers
Managing Director - George Weil & Sons Ltd

The leading supplier to Fabric Painters, Dyers and Printers, Glass Painters
Hand weavers, Hand Spinners and Dyers, Felt & Paper makers
based at Guildford, Surrey, UK
email md@georgeweil.co.uk
phone 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax 0 (+44) 1483 565807

----- Original Message -----
From: <wevrscroft@aeroinc.net>
To: <WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2001 7:21 PM
Subject: [WeaveTech] upcoming UK trip help needed


hi all, could i have some help please? i am will be in the UK,s.e. of
London, sept. 10 to 24th. i would like to visit weaving, textile,
wooly places.
Any ideas, advice?
much thanks in advance
susan keating


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Avl Home Loom

KarenC1994@...
 

Anyone have any comments on this loom? Also what are the differences (other
than price) from the Avl Modular loom?
Thanks
Karen


Re: Studio design - space planning

MartyCP@...
 


Re: Brake....?

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

It has a rope brake that is wrapped TWICE around the beam.. I am thinking
just a third wrap will help? How many times are they supposed to be
wrapped?
I'd try unwrapping the rope and rewrapping it in the opposite direction, it
makes a difference with some brakes ! Also clean the brake drum with dry
cloth only; no oil or wax should be near it.
Let me know how that goes...

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: Gilmore looms

Laura MacCary <lmaccary@...>
 

I feel the same way. The one at school (about 45") had a very shallow shed
and the leverage on the treadles wasn't good-if I was weaving in sock feet
(shoes were too wide to fit on the treadles) my feet would slip off the
treadles. I had to go barefoot and still I had problems with leverage. I
also noticed that some of these at school have a twisted warp beam.
laura

everybody i ever knew who had a gilmore loved it. however,
everytime i have
woven on one, i wished i hadnt. the shed is so shallow
because of that
lovely low profile


Re: Picture of V.Gravandar

Laura MacCary <lmaccary@...>
 

Hi Sharon or anyone else with info;

Last summer I briefly had a funny little swedish-style loom with an overhead
beater pivoted behind wooden pegs and a spoon brake which also caught on
wooden pegs. I had it long enough to get it working again (all the cords had
been cut & lost, and the jack box at the top was assembled wrong). The paper
tape on the reed top & bottom had a sticker on it that said The Linn Looms,
with an address in Seattle. Do you have any other information about this?
Were the Linns weaving retailers, or loom builders, or something else? I'd
love to tell the current owner any history on this loom.

Laura

I have a loom built for a Caroline Linn of Seattle by Mama
Gravander's husband in 1930.
(snip)
Sharon C. Hinze


Studio design-space planning

Lynne E. Chick <lchick@...>
 

Ya mean I was supposed to plan my studio space? No laughing now. We have
2400 square feet of basement, which is where I have my "studio". I plopped
two floor looms in the end where I had been doing my upholstery business.
Lots of great flourescent lighting there. House is on a little slope, so
there aren't many steps up out of the hatchway, so I have a screen door in
the opening so I can see daylight and get a nice breeze and can also put a
plastic storm window on in the winter. There are at least 10 steel shelves
and wire shelves for yarn and some folded wool yardgoods. Bags of about 800
pounds of rag strips are piled in a heap on top of someone's stored
furniture and some on the floor. Some yarn is also on "shelves" of apple
boxes, and believe it or not, yarn is also stacked on top of an unfinished
strip wood canoe that my second son started 8 years ago (Anyone have any
idea how to get my son to get that out of our basement and to his own
house?). In another corner of the basement there are boxes and boxes and
bags of fabrics. When I was doing upholstery, I was given a wonderful 4' X
8' work bench that was built by someone, who was smart and put shelves under
it. It is one very sturdy work area that a heavy sofa and I could be on all
at
once, but I added another 4' X 8' piece of plywood that I hinged to the edge
and added some legs that are hinged that drop down when that piece of
plywood is unfolded to make an 8' X 8' work area, which is great for laying
out large hand woven pieces on as well as wonderful for tying quilts on.
Behind the table is a rack with 3 rows of closet poles that I used for
upholstery fabric rolls, and now I hang finished hand woven things on there
to dry when I can't dry them in the dryer, and the ends make a great place
to hang chained warp waiting to be on the loom. My sewing machine is
against the long side of another 4' X 6' table with a couple sets of drawers
on
the left end of the machine so I can work on long pieces and they don't fall
on the floor while being sewn. Another sewing machine, an antique Singer
industrial machine is to the right of that
sewing machine. To the left of my Toika is a wing-back chair and pole lamp
so when I have company, they can sit and chat while I work, but noone has
come to visit, so that's full of weaving stuff. I guess some of my fibers
are a little organized because I have wool yarn in one section, cotton in
another, and acrylic in another. BUT I do know where just about everything
is unless you ask me for my scissors.

Lynne in Maine
Anyone can count the seeds in an apple... but only God can count the apples
in a seed.
http://www.weaveworks.com


Re: Gilmore looms for rugs?

nancy
 

everybody i ever knew who had a gilmore loved it. however, everytime i have woven on one, i wished i hadnt. the shed is so shallow because of that lovely low profile that i had the most painful hangnails. i tried handlotion and gloves with fingertips cut out etc.
beautiful woodwork. nice looking to sit in main room of house etc. but very painful hands for me for week or so after weaving on one

At 06:42 PM 8/19/2001 -0700, you wrote:
I have to agree that Gilmore looms are terrific gems.....I own a 32" 8
shaft, non-folding model built in 1968 and it is one of my
treasures.......however, I would not recommend more than an occasional rug
be woven on these looms....they are simply not heavy enough to withstand the
rigors of rug weaving.....
Maybe the 32" is different., but my 46" Gilmore is built like the
proverbial brick out house. I wouldn't want to have the loom on slick
floors and try to make very many rugs without attaching it to the floor. I
still say it would last and last and last for rug beating.

I do agree with Su that really heavy framing, such as on the Oxaback along
with its heavy overhead beater, would be even better for rugs. That loom,
however is not to be considered low profile under any circumstances.

Francie



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