Date   

shaft-switching

peter collingwood <peter@...>
 

I think with due respect that introducing reed width into an explanation
of SS is a red herring! (Reed herring?)
If you are using the three-end block weave, with a (123), (124)
threading then you need to switch between 3 and 4, the shafts which are
carrying the pattern making ends.
If you are setting this at 4 epi, then you have to have some switching
device every 3/4 of an inch. The ends which would NORMALLY be threaded
on 3 or 4, pass between empty heddles on these two shafts. Two 'doups'
or a length of Texsolv, ARE threaded through these two shafts and also
they have that unthreaded free warp end threaded through them. Some
device then enables you to tighten the doups and so temporarily attach
the free warp end, either to shaft 3 or 4, depending on the pattern.

If using the four-end blockweave with (1323), (1424) threading, also at
4 epi, then you need an SS arrangement every 1/2 inch.
The Harrisville loom lever system now has the latter setting. Obviously
by missing out levers you can use it for the three-end blockweave as
well.

Weavers have tried to make looms with closer settings, notably Sadye
Wilson. This can produce a finer fabric nearer a tapestry in texture
than a floor rug. But there is a limit when trying to operate minute,
closely packed, levers does not save time.... and a Dobby or Jacquard is
a better instrument.

Peter Collingwood


Re: shipping loom

Barbara Nathans <bnathans@...>
 

Others have answereed the quesion better than I could as myloom is being
picked up.

Barbara Nathans


Re: AVL - overhead beater out of true

Deanna Johnson
 

WHY switch back and forth from the single box to the double box? It is
perfectly easy to use the double box for a single shuttle.
True, but I have found that the single box fly shuttle is *much* easier to use - easier on my body anyway. My loom is in a small room, and it is quite a feat to switch, but I think it was worth it in my case. Mine is not an overhead, but a standard one.

But, I too have some questions for you experts out there.

Every once in a while, the right side of the single box fly shuttle would come off its peg at the bottom. I would suddenly notice that the beater wasn't hitting straight, and then have to reposition it and then unweave a little. Anybody else experience this?

The other problem I encountered had to do with the wooden piece that has the leather loop attached to it to catch the shuttle. The wooden piece has two pins through it, one of them for attaching the cord. The problem I ran into was having one of those pins keep easing itself out. It would then start gouging the wood on the inside of the box, usually stopping it. I would have to stop, remove the wooden piece, push the pin back in and continue weaving. This happened frequently. I finally decided to reverse the wooden piece so the loop would be toward the inside of the loom and the cord dragging on the pin wouldn't pull it out. But this means that on one side of the loom, the wooden piece is in a different configuration than on the other side, which seems awkward. Has anyone else had this problem?

Deanna

Now, if we only could clone Georgean Curran's husband so that he could make
for each of us the flicking system he devised for her loom, we would all be
in fat city. His system is so logical and takes so little effort to throw
the shuttle.
P.S. Any chance of seeing pictures of this?


liserie, lisere

Alice Schlein <aschlein@...>
 

Is anyone familiar with the terms liserie or lisere?

I've been using a structure as follows: A single warp closely set (closer than for balanced plain weave), two wefts alternating pick & pick. Weft #1 interlaces in plain weave throughout, weft #2 interlaces in the SAME plain weave shed in ground areas, and in a satin order in pattern areas. The ground effect is weftwise ribs, with both wefts in the same plain weave shed. Pattern effect is satin with weft #2, and weft #1 interlacing more or less invisibly in plain weave behind.

This structure works in blocks, in network drafting, in jacquard, and with a pickup stick. I have been told by a knowledgeable weaver that the structure I have described is known as <<liserie>>, but I have been unable so far to discover any references to this in my reading. In Fairchild's Dictionary of Textiles I have found a reference to <<lisere>>, which says, in part, <<A heavy, French, corded silk fabric made with brocade floral patterns formed by the filling and jacquard figures formed by the warp>>. This definition comes close, but is not really exact.

Does anyone out there have experience with the structure I have described, or with the terms liserie, lisere, or similar???

Please note that I am NOT referring to the French term lisiere, with an accent grave over the first e. Apparently this means selvage in English.

Alice


Re: AVL - overhead beater out of true

Alcorn <alcorn@...>
 

I have both a single and a
double box
WHY switch back and forth from the single box to the double box? It is
perfectly easy to use the double box for a single shuttle. As you have
described, it is a huge hassle to switch boxes. It's an even bigger hassle
to adjust everything.

Now, if we only could clone Georgean Curran's husband so that he could make
for each of us the flicking system he devised for her loom, we would all be
in fat city. His system is so logical and takes so little effort to throw
the shuttle.

Francie


crating looms

Ingrid Boesel <ingrid@...>
 

I too had a shipping problem when I sold my AVL.

I had not kept any of the original boxes (my husband let me know of my shortcomings as he keeps all boxes)
So I searched.
Moving companies are only worth contacting for shipping looms, if it is more than one, if you are shipping your household as well, and if it is all the way from one coat to the other.
Shipping companies refused to tough the loom stuff as they wanted to build a pallet for it, have a shipping dock to load and unload it and were almost as expensive as movers
I found a crating company that ships by carrier of your choice from UPS to Mike the Mover. The company advised me to the procedure needed to ship it safely.

I ended up buying a large roll of the shrink wrap stuff and scrounging bubble pack for a few weeks
I took pictures of every piece coming off with the digital camera (best thing I did in the whole thing) As a few pieces accumulated on the studio floor, I wrapped then in shrink wrap making each bundle big enough to bother with, but small enough for me to lift. Each piece was numbered and all washers, screws and bolts were taped to the piece I used green masking tape for painters. It peels easily without leaving a residue.

I took it all apart by myself until I came to the castle. Then both of us worked to get that apart. We took it to the crater and he then put it on a standard pallet. The Compu-dobby was put in a box with shaped foam which fit exactly, more bubble wrap etc. It went into the most secure part of the shipping pallet. Everything was foamed into place, shrink wrapped, and strapped. He then had UPS take it away the next day. They took care of the border stuff too. Since it was being re-imported it was easier then when I imported it originally.

A reed went missing, which is hard to understand since it was packed with other flat pieces when it left here. There was no other damage reported.

This was cheaper by at least 1/3 from the next price I was given, and the others never included everything in the price. This guy quoted and we paid no more than the quote. Ask about insurance too.
Ingrid Boesel, the weaving half of Fiberworks PCW

Visit us at: http://www.fiberworks-pcw.com
Email: ingrid@fiberworks-pcw.com


Re: AVL - overhead beater out of true

Jim Stovall
 

I've had similar troubles, without changing equipment, so I'll be interested in suggestions from others. One thing to check for is that the loom frame is perfectly "square", where the corners are exactly 90 degrees, and level. You can use a carpenter's square, which is a "L" shaped metal tool to check the corner angles.

When desperate, I have been known to lubricate the pieces that were binding by rubbing dry soap on the wood (for lack of silicon spray or other remedies) to reduce the friction.

From: Kerstin Froberg
The fact that the beater binds in its beating position makes it
harder to achieve an even beat, it makes weaving harder work (more
force to move the beater) - and it makes a noice...
Any tips?
--


Re: Shaft Switching....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

and now I
am provoked to wonder if any of your gorgeous rugs were woven in ways NOT
shaft-shifted.
Yes ! Some were done with a 12 shaft CM; I used S & W with crackle* ( Corded
) treadling . That loom is now being reworked to give me more blocks to do
the same weave. I'm making a modified Shaft Switch/Draw system, without
doups or lingos; I have hopes it'll be successful !

* S & W Crackle or Corded can be found in:" The Summer & Winter Weave" by
Helen Daniels Young ( no ISBD # )
and
The Weaver¹s Journal # 24,Spring 1982, page 48

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Visit to the U.K.

sfsaulson@...
 

The British Crafts Council has a lovely gallery in London. When I was last
there the current show was exquisitely executed contemporary handwoven Indian
textiles. When you are at the gallery, you can pick up the Council's
listing of craft galleries throughout the entire country. When you arrive in
London, pick up a copy of the weekly entertainment magazine, Timeout. It
lists all the gallery shows in London, with addresses.
Sarah Saulson


Re: shaft-switching/fish...

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I think with due respect that introducing reed width into an explanation
of SS is a red herring! (Reed herring?)
Thanks Peter, you tell it very clearly. Weavers are programmed to think in
terms of sett and when I mentioned " reed " it confused some.
I was trying, in my simple way, to show the width of the weaving and its
relation to the number of shaft-switch doups that could be operated easily
by a weaver. ( a 40 " reed = 80 pattern blocks @ 1/2" width . I guess I
should have said a 40" weaving = 80 pattern blocks @ 1/2" width ?)

But there is a limit when trying to operate minute,
closely packed, levers does not save time...
I think a 1/4" lever switcher is possible, but as Peter stated, it'd be
slower to operate with normal sized fingers; perhaps two switchers could be
stacked up, but they'd have to be counterbalanced with weights and the huge
mass of doups would mesh in the 4 shafts so the shed would probably not open
as high or fast as one wanted ? Another way I thought about would be to use
an 8 shaft loom and switch shafts 1/4 and 5/8, using shafts 2&3and 6&7 as
ground. This would allow 1/2" levers yet 1/4" blocks and the doup crush
would not be bad.
How about that idea, Peter ?

My last ss device used sliding collars operating on wires 1/2" apart, on
shaft #1. This was mounted vertically and so was very close to my hand for
easy changes; the doups went up over an aluminum tube mounted on rollers.
Shaft # 2 held only a strip of wood with eyes to guide the doups down;
shafts 3&4 were the ground. It was successful but got I tired of 1/2"
blocks.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


AVL - overhead beater out of true

Kerstin Froberg <kerstin.froberg@...>
 

I seem to have got over my problem with the double box stop screws
shaking loose (thanks, Francie!).
Now I need to get at the next problem. I have both a single and a
double box, and I switch between them as required. This means I
have to dismantle the (overhead) beater, and change the (um...)
"thingies" that comes from the beater and sit outside the loom
frame, supposedly to stabilize the beater. What happens (I
suppose) is that the beater goes out of true, and the "thingies"
bind on the loom frame on one side. I have problems to "rack the
beater" on my own, and, also, it seems that the (um...) "clamps"?
at the back of the "stabilizing arm" slip.
The fact that the beater binds in its beating position makes it
harder to achieve an even beat, it makes weaving harder work (more
force to move the beater) - and it makes a noice...
Any tips?

Kerstin in Sweden


Re: lisere....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

You've described what's shown in text and two sketches, in "Warp & Weft, A
Dictionary of Textile Terms", by Dorothy K. Burnham, page 86.
It shows it can be done two ways; one main weft floating as pattern, the
other uses doubled wefts, one weft interlacing as " a firm ground ", the
other weft floats as pattern.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California

I've been using a structure as follows: A single warp closely set
(closer than for balanced plain weave), two wefts alternating pick &
pick. Weft #1 interlaces in plain weave throughout, weft #2
interlaces in the SAME plain weave shed in ground areas, and in a
satin order in pattern areas. The ground effect is weftwise ribs,
with both wefts in the same plain weave shed. Pattern effect is satin
with weft #2, and weft #1 interlacing more or less invisibly in plain
weave behind.


Re: AVL ...

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

Why not ask Peter Straus ? He has come onto this list before with
suggestions !
pstraus@avlusa.com


Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: New website for guild

Anne Wells <arwells@...>
 

There is a typo in this. It should be potomaccraftsmenguild.org. (no "t").
Anne
arwells@erols.com

Ruth Blau wrote:

Our guild, Potomac Craftsmen, has a new website. It's still somewhat of a
work in progress, but a lot of the basic info is there. Since many people
visit the Washington, DC, each year, I thought you'd like to have this
reference so you can see if the guild is doing something when you'll be in
town. Visitors are always welcome at our meetings.

<www.potomaccraftsmentguild.org>

Ruth


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Re: New website for guild

Janet Stollnitz <jstoll@...>
 

Whoops! Ruth has an error in the URL for the Potomac Craftsmen
website. (Her fingers are probably tired from handling all the admin.
details. Thanks Ruth and Amy!)

The correct URL is:
<www.potomaccraftsmenguild.org>

Please do check the site and feel free to join us when you are in the
Washington, DC, area.

Janet

_____________________________________________________________
Janet Stollnitz jstoll@cpcug.org
Silver Spring, MD
_____________________________________________________________


Best 20$ my teenage daughter ever spent...

dkuchta@...
 

I found a great tool for twisting warp ends. Conair created this
thing called a hair twister. My teenage daughter bought one so she
could do up her hair like Cristina Agulera.

Anyway, it is shaped like a tuning fork and has a two direction slide
switch. At the top of each "prong of the fork" is a hook bolstered by
a push button. Your supposed to push the button and put a hank of
hair in each one. (Wool works better though!! :-)
When you slide the switch in one direction it rotates each of the
prongs clockwise. When you slide the switch in the other
direction it rotates the whole thing at the base of the U in the
opposite direction. (Basically that reproduces the untwist motion
when doing fringe by hand.)

After my daughter tired of this thing I tried it out on a wool
blanket where it worked really well. Also on some 20/2 perl cotton
used on a runner where it worked less well, but still acceptably.

It's really fast once you get the hang of it and uses 2 AA batteries.

No, I don't work for Conair and I don't have any financial gain from
this.

I just thought it was a neat thing from an unexpected place...


New website for guild

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

Our guild, Potomac Craftsmen, has a new website. It's still somewhat of a work in progress, but a lot of the basic info is there. Since many people visit the Washington, DC, each year, I thought you'd like to have this reference so you can see if the guild is doing something when you'll be in town. Visitors are always welcome at our meetings.

<www.potomaccraftsmentguild.org>

Ruth


Re: Shipping a loom

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

The seller had a handy man/carpenter make three crates-
2 for the loom and 1 for the bench out of plywood. I
paid $125.00 for the crating. It was shipped to me via
a freight company. <snip>
The seller of my loom checked the shipping cost
with a moving company and it was over $1,000. 8^)
You'll notice that when you order a loom new from the manufacturer, it is not brought by a moving company. It's brought just the way Lois describes--crated and carried by a freight company.

Ruth


Re: Housecleaning pages $$$

bksnapa@...
 

I think you must have a wrong address. I am not selling an AVL. - Barbara


Shipping a loom

Jessica Speer <speerj@...>
 

I, too, would like to know about shipping the loom. The only option I can
think of are pick up/delivery or a house hold mover.
Jessica