Date   

Re: storing reeds

Ann Shafer
 

I store reeds and other upright things in a huge straw container, sort of
like a straw umbrella stand. Ann


Re: runner (?) for wedding

Su Butler <apbutler@...>
 

to weave a white ????? for her daughter to stand on during the
wedding. Laurie will be getting married in a garden not a Church
HI Johnetta..... A few years ago, a dear friend of mine got married in a
garden behind her home.....she woven many, many yards of rag runners to walk
to the garden arbor which was the makeshift alter....was lovely....then she
gave the runners to friends who helped with the wedding.....I was fortunate
enough to be among the recipients.........it was really a nice look, and
could be done in all white if that is what the bride preferred....the rag
runners were heavy enough to not curl up and cause the bride/groom to
trip.......really nice!

Su Butler :-) apbutler@ync.net
'My mother said to me, "If you become a soldier, you'll be a general, if you
become a monk you'll end up as the pope." Instead, I became a painter and
wound up as Picasso.' - Pablo Picasso
so we really don't


Re: Gilmore looms for rugs?

Su Butler <apbutler@...>
 

I have to agree that Gilmore looms are terrific gems.....I own a 32" 8
shaft, non-folding model built in 1968 and it is one of my
treasures.......however, I would not recommend more than an occasional rug
be woven on these looms....they are simply not heavy enough to withstand the
rigors of rug weaving.....transparencies, yes......weft faced weaves yes,
but heavy duty rug weaving....no.......you, the finished product and the
loom, will be better off using a very heavy (large framing members and
extreme weight to the loom itself!) CM or CB loom for rug weaving.
The loom is extremely well built, but simply was not designed to be a rug
weaving loom. They lack the weight necessary to make the loom stay put
while weaving. While they do indeed have a good ratchet and pawl brake
system, it is not nearly as heavy and sturdy as that found on looms designed
to weave rugs. The tension required to weave a well executed rug can
actually pull the mortise and tenon joints on the Gilmore loom apart.....I
have personal experience with this folks.......and a rug woven on these
looms simply is not as high a quality as those woven on a loom more suitable
to the purpose.......I *have* woven the occasional rug on my Gilmore....no
more however, as I can see and feel the difference in the rugs I weave on my
CM loom.......I use my Gilmore for weaving everything, *except*
rugs......and would recommend anyone truly wanting to weave rugs or heavy
tapestry type fabrics consider a loom designed for that purpose......
Not knocking, but rather endorsing Gilmore looms, as long as they are used
as they were intended to be used......

Su Butler :-) apbutler@ync.net
'My mother said to me, "If you become a soldier, you'll be a general, if you
become a monk you'll end up as the pope." Instead, I became a painter and
wound up as Picasso.' - Pablo Picasso


Re: studio

sigridpiroch@...
 

I've enjoyed hearing the various studio setups from many of our
members. Today I am very fortunate here in western PA to have an ARTS
STUDIO separate from my home, 4 miles upriver on the Allegheny, but
that was not true until about 5 years ago. During those many years
previously [20+] we rented a small bi-level home in another town to
the north -- 4 small bedrooms, kitchette & Living Room + basement
which flooded regularly -- with DH & 3 growing children who
eventually colleged us almost into the poor house! [They're now in
the 30's but one is still in Law School.] I managed, between our home
& my Dad's Apartment, to spin with 9 wheels & weave on a Baby Wolf 8,
BW 8 w/Combby, 12 shaft Nilart with double beam [which luckily folded
up] & table looms 8 & 12. So I literally took over parts of each
section of the house & that included my library of books & samples &
textiles which literally filled the walls everywhere. The trick was
to switch equipment from room-to-room &, in good weather, out onto
the porch. As each went off to college they forfeited their space
right off but not necessarily willingly. Somehow I also researched,
taught & bound my book from both locations.

This all changed in 1996 just when it seemed we would have no place
to hang out hats, not alone "stuff"... we moved farther south to a
wonderful authentic log home of 4000 square feet overlooking the
river in Foxburg PA. [Now we rent only from the bank.] Here I have
a huge office embarrassingly filled with computer equipment & wall-to-
wall banker's boxes of workshop materials [the wall-to-wall thing
hasn't changed]as well as suitcased in a basement room [which doesn't
flood]. Here I reason it's OK to accumulate my "wealth" as I also
continue to research, write & teach "computer textile design" as well
as "handspinning basics, worsteds, etc".

Altho I never even dreamed I'd have my own separate Studio, sometimes
magic happens. Four miles away in Emlenton PA is my ARTS STUDIO where
all the weaving happens -- a whole building on a double lot, 3 floors
[3 BRs, 2 full baths, kitchen, dining room, office, video rooms &
attic] plus a full 2 floor extension --> the main level has all our
looms & computers which now also includes ANNI ALBER'S BAUHAUS CM
LOOM which we rebuilt & a David Thorpe interfaced loom from NZ with
air lift [the only one in the Americas]. The lower level houses
yarns, warping equipment, tables & blackboards for 8-10 students.
Although ARTS has been open for 4 years, the last of the building
renovations as of this month are finally completed!

I welcome anyone who wishes to come to visit. We are located between
Exits 5 & 6 off I-80. Just let me know you're coming so I can be
available to share time. Thanks for sharing your space & listening
about mine. Sigrid


Studio design - space planning

archfarm@...
 

Studio design is an interesting discussion. To help those enchanted
with the idea of a studio from getting too caught up in the romance of
it, may I suggest those who either have an existing studio or who are
planning a new studio approach its design from a space planning
perspective. In our architectural practice we always utilize a "form
follows function" approach. The weaving studio is a machine, a piece of
technology which should function to meet each weaver's or group of
weaver's program of use. Of course part of its function is that it
should also be a very enchanting, beguiling, thought and creativity
provoking place.

All of that requires determining what the end woven products will be and
working backward through the production of each to break out each
activity required in their production. It may require a new weaver to
do some very long term thinking about their goals and objectives as a
weaver...and may even require rethought by the seasoned production
weaver. Here are a few of the elements of good space planning and the
subsequent architecture. Most are obvious, but perhaps it is worth
outlining some that we consider in our projects:

1. Site planning :

How will you get that 10' wide AVL rug loom into your studio if it is
built on a steep hillside, or in a tight complex of artists' studios?

Do you need a receving dock, or some form of mechanical lift? How
about weather protection of the receiving area - delicate equipment and
fibers can be destroyed by exposure if you are not there to receive
them.

In siting the studio, or in choosing a space to rent for a studio, have
you considered the orientation to natural light as it affects your
choice of colors, shadows cast on your weaving area or assembly area?

How about public exposure - do you want to enable it or prevent it? If
you want public exposure, how will you get people there; do you need to
plan for wheelchair ramps, etc.? Do you need to provide customer
parking? Should the parking area be directly adjacent?

Do you neighbors need buffered from the noise of your compressors by
means of vegetative plantings or acoustical walls?

If the studio is to be in your home, is it reasonable to the rest of
the family to put it next to the sleeping areas? Or if in an artists'
loft, what other types of artists or craftspersons should you be close
to or furthest from in order to be compatible neighbors? The group
situation will require the group's coordinated thinking about the
architectural systems all of your studios will share.

2. Functional and Ergonomic Space:

Determine the Space Envelope for each activity, incuding subcategories
of activities.
Ever notice how birds sit only so close to each other on the telephone
wire? That is because they need a safe envelope into which to land and
from which to take off.

For example, materials storage includes receiving, sorting, record
keeping, and should be located where in your studio, and be adjacent to
_________ and ________, etc.

Warping the loom requires ____________feet of space on each side and
underneath, plus _________ feet of vertical space. That added to the
dimensions of my loom says the space envelop for my loom should be
______' X _______' X _______., etc.

Doors or other openings onto the space need to be considered as well.
There is nothing like designing an efficient studio and finding the rug
loom cannot be gotten into it because the door is either too small, or
is located on a tight hall or stair that does not allow loom parts to
turn the corner.

Is an ADA compliant studio required due to State regulations because you
will have employes or because the public will have access to it...or
because you, the weaver, have a disability?

2. Mechanical systems:
Determine the complement of mechanical systems required for each
activity, including heating, ventilation and air quality, power,
lighting, sound control, humidity control, moth and rodent control,
telephones and other electronic equipment, etc.

Should the studio have plumbing and lavatories? What will be the impact
on plumbing as well as groundwater or a municipal sewer system?

Will you be doing both wet tasks and dry tasks in this studio? Is it
important to separate them?

What types of lighting are required for each task?

3. Structural systems:

Do you need to tie down your looms so they do not move around? Perhaps
that concrete floor can be designed with tie downs.

Do you want to design a system for warping the loom which provides a
warping pit, or that enables you to lift the loom to a position that
does not require you to lay under it? If so, these affect the form of
the structure of the building.

The weight of the equipment (similar to the stacks in libraries) can be
considerable. Your architect or structural engineer needs to be
appraised of these in order to size floor joists.

4. Interior color palette - how it affect the diversity of color
planning and choices you will be involved in in your design work?

5. Surface materials - ease of maintenance, suitability to the task,
etc.?

6. Built-in features - storage and furnishings?

7. Spiritual ambiance - aesthetics are a functional element of your
working space?

These are just a few of the considerations that should go into planning
a studio or any kind of living, playing, working, spiritual place -
exterior or interior. Time spent in careful planning can save much
money and regret later. It also helps you develop a realistic budget
: - )

Myra


Re: Picture of V.Gravandar

nancy
 

oh thanks [when, of course, i figure out how to see it]
i have a single piece of equipment that was hers. she had already died and i never met her. it is a floor stand skeinwinder in "svedish blue". i was told she was very very attached to "svedish blue"
now, i can get picture and print it for my scrapbook

At 06:32 PM 8/19/2001 +0000, you wrote:
Well, I just posted a picture of Mama Gravandar to the Photo file...I
hope I did it right. She and one of her spinning group were
demonstrating at the San Francisco Art Festival sometime during the
70s perhaps. Ruth and Amy, please tell me if I did it wrong. glen b.



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Picture of V.Gravandar

willgee@...
 

Well, I just posted a picture of Mama Gravandar to the Photo file...I
hope I did it right. She and one of her spinning group were
demonstrating at the San Francisco Art Festival sometime during the
70s perhaps. Ruth and Amy, please tell me if I did it wrong. glen b.


Re: gathering info about studio

Sally Breckenridge
 

We have just completed building and moving into our dream house with dream
studio. In San Jose, our house was filled with loom & weaving supplies in
every room. The house in Colorado is built with a large 2000 sq. ft.
daylight basement. Its really not a basement as it is very spacious with
9ft ceilings and windows on one side. My husband gets an office and a
workshop (which I am slowing overtaking for dyeing) but the rest of the
space is my weaving studio and office so its probably about 1500sq ft. We
put in track lighting and shelves with glass front cupboards for the yarn.
These cupboards line the back wall so that they get minimal daylight. The
builder was concerned that I was building such a large "sewing" room but it
is divided into seaveral areas with at least 2 ft. space to walk around for
each large loom (JComp&AVL & Fireside) and about 6 to 8 ft at the back
between looms to provide space to do sectional warping. This space tends to
fill with smaller portable looms. Then there is an area set up for sewing
machine and work table and space for a cutting table (not yet built), a
window seat area for lounging and reading, a small kitchenette and space for
a couple of large work tables. My husband & I share the work table area for
many projects that we seem to always have going. I also have a office where
I do my computer work with shelves & tables for the WeaveIt production.

I do spend a lot of time in the studio and plan to do even more in the
future. The most difficult part was planning the electrical outlets.
Because the space is so large & open, just having outlets along the walls is
not sufficient so we have them in the ceiling & floors but guessing the
exact position wanted was extremely diffcult when looking at a floor plan.
I made little paper cutouts of the looms and furniture but still didn't get
it quite right so I would like to move some of the them. [Highly
unlikely...] I am still setting things up in the space but it is still
very exciting for me to be in the studio.

Sally


Re: Track lighting....

LHolzbach@...
 

Consult with the specialists at the lighting supply place. Tell them what
your needs are. The reason track plug-ins are good is that you can move your
equipment, etc. around and change the position of the lighting, or you can
plug in whatever electric gizmo you want where ever you need it. Yes, you
must make sure you don't overload it. I use halogen lights which come with
their own transformers. The bulbs last forever, and the transformer converts
to low-voltage.
Lorrie


Re: gathering info about studio

LHolzbach@...
 

It is possible to put tracks in the ceiling and buy outlet plugs that fit
into the track, as well as track lights. Lightolier is one manufacturer who
has them, but there are probably others. Thus, with an 8 foot track, you can
plug something in anywhere along its length.
Lorrie


runner (?) for wedding

Johnetta Heil <luv2weave@...>
 

Hi all! My GF's daughter is getting married next April and Donna wanted me
to weave a white ????? for her daughter to stand on during the wedding.
Laurie will be getting married in a garden not a Church so we really don't
want the white runner but something like it??? Any ideas? suggestions??
Johnetta




Lamplight Creations
Leasburg, North Carolina

web page
http://luv2weave.tripod.com/index.html


Re: Looms with Low Profiles...

Alcorn <alcorn@...>
 

There is also the 8 shaft low profile "work of art" Fireside looms made in
Port Ludlow, Washington. The Fireside loom uses a stainless steel worm
screw to advance the warp. I don't know how well the worm screw system
would behave with the heavy beating for rugs. The loom is a wood workers
dream and is very sturdy and very heavy. Every time one walks by a
Fireside one wants to fondle the wood. The Fireside is several times more
expensive than the Gilmore.

Fireside also makes that wonderful "commuter bench where the seat slides
easily on ball bearings.

Francie


Re: storing reeds

Alcorn <alcorn@...>
 

No, this is correct. I know of at least one weaver who stored reeds
standing up,
and over the years, they have warped slightly. I have one reed that is
slightly
warped, too, from being stored in an upright position. It is worse for longer
reeds than for short reeds.
As weaving isn't an exact science, what difference does it make if the
reeds bend or warp a bit? When they are inserted in the beater, the beater
will straighten them. I have stored my reeds vertically for many years and
have noticed no effects on the weaving.

Francie


Storing reeds and Gilmore

willgee@...
 

Hi..I think reeds are perfectly happy standing up. As long as they are
standing UP and not LEANING! Unless somehow a reed gets really
severely bent, the batten holds it straight in its grooves. My real
bugaboo was distorted dents, thanks to beginning assistants and other
folk who would poke with other than a reed hook. Grrr!

Indeed, Gilmore was a responsive loombuilder. There was not such a
thing as a short conversation with Everett G. We went up to his place
to buy something; an hour after arrival we were still sitting on a log
talking to Mr. Gilmore while he asked about the health of my looms.

Neither of my Gilmores cost me more than $150; bought from retiring
weavers. Mr. Gilmore remembered the entire history of both looms from
the time they left his hands. A great guy... glen b.


Re: Track lighting....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

It is possible to put tracks in the ceiling and buy outlet plugs that fit
into the track, as well as track lights.
This is true, however every track has a labeled maximum total wattage and to
go over that total is risky. I put track lighting in our garage for
attending to our pampered old sports car. I wanted good light so I ordered
extra cans for the track at the time I bought it; upon assembling the track
and cans I soon concluded that I couldn't use high wattage in every can or
I'd overlaod the track and risk bad things. I compromised by using lower
wattage bulbs where the light wasn't a high priority.
Tracks are fun and mini-spot bulbs work well in the cans.

Electri-tech talk:
( Volts X Amps = Watts, Amps = Watts divided by Volts )

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in California

" Suburbia: where they tear out the trees and then name streets
after them. "


Re: Boxes

RUSLYN@...
 

What works very well are the 12" x 12" x 14" high egg crate cardboard boxes
with cut out handles which you can get at your local grocery store. These
usually hold 15 dozen eggs. They are perfect for so many uses.

I use them for the classes to hold lease sticks, paper, and reeds. Also put
4 of them in the back of my van for convenience.

Lynn Silberschlag
Tucson, Az.


Re: storing reeds

Anne Wells <arwells@...>
 

Ruth Blau wrote:

I read somewhere that someone used an old golf bag for this purpose. I have
some reeds in an umbrella stand.
I had understood from some past, dim memory that it's not a good idea to
store reeds upright. That you should either lay them flat or suspend them
upright (i.e., hang them). Is this an old weaver's tale? ...
No, this is correct. I know of at least one weaver who stored reeds standing up,
and over the years, they have warped slightly. I have one reed that is slightly
warped, too, from being stored in an upright position. It is worse for longer
reeds than for short reeds.
Anne
arwells@erols.com


Re: storing reeds, Gilmore looms

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

I read somewhere that someone used an old golf bag for this purpose. I have
some reeds in an umbrella stand.
I had understood from some past, dim memory that it's not a good idea to store reeds upright. That you should either lay them flat or suspend them upright (i.e., hang them). Is this an old weaver's tale? My reeds lie flat on the floor under a work table. They're out of the way & not hard to get to when I need to change reeds.

I agree w/ Francie that the Gilmore looms are wonderful. I have the 8-shaft Little Gem workshop loom, and I think it's the sturdiest workshop loom on the market. I loathe the Gilmore tieup system, however, and have converted my Little Gem to texsolv. I first saw this loom at Convergence at Portland (my first Convergence). As the preconference workshops were breaking up, I saw many people wheeling these looms out of the conference center. Gilmore looms aren't very well known on the east coast, and my reaction was, "What *is* that nifty loom???"

By the time I got around to ordering one, they had discontinued the 8-shaft model. I asked (this is when Mr. Gilmore was still alive) how many looms would have to be ordered for them to make a special run. "Oh, about 3," I was told. Working through the internet, we put together an order of 14, and they did a special production run for us. I believe subsequently (a year or so later) another group got together & the Gilmores did another special run.

Isn't it nice to have responsive vendors?

Ruth


Re: gathering info about studios

janee233
 

--- In WeaveTech@y..., LHolzbach@a... wrote:
I read somewhere that someone used an old golf bag for this
purpose. I have
some reeds in an umbrella stand.
My reeds, sticks, switfts, rolls of warp paper, rulers, pickup
sticks, raddle and temple are stored in the large white plastic
tubs (5 gallon?) that painters/plasterers use. They were
originally bought to soak/rinse yarns while dyeing, but I'll need to
get more when I start dyeing again as these are fully occupied.

Jane


Re: Storing reeds....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I think reeds are perfectly happy standing up. As long as they are
standing UP and not LEANING!
We've been standing reeds ( longest are 62" ) vertically since 1976 with no
warping or bowing. I have a sketch of our reed stand at:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/gallery/view?username=billk
It holds nine reeds.
Here in CA, I secure the stand to the wall with a hook, for our little shaky
quakes.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California

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