Date   

Re: Friction Brakes

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

the loom
was only a year or so old and had been oiled as part of the finishing
(Harrisville kit). No problems back then, or when it was last oiled,
years ago now. Only problems are recently.
Hmmm.... Still, it won't hurt to wash the ropes and the beam area where they
touch; something has changed or been added to the brake. It may be that the
ropes are shot, in which case that's easy to replace. Difficult to talk
about without seeing the loom itself. Usually a brake problem is a result of
re-assembling the parts wrong but in your case that's not the reason
obviously.

-- Happy Shuttling ! Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: Friction Brakes

Holly <holly@...>
 

Bill writes:

<<Try to keep any oils, waxes, grease and
silicones out of the brakes, the ropes and the area that the ropes
touch.>>

Well, but :) When I first started using this braking system, the loom
was only a year or so old and had been oiled as part of the finishing
(Harrisville kit). No problems back then, or when it was last oiled,
years ago now. Only problems are recently.

Holly


Re: Friction Brakes

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

The ropes are not actually wound on the brake drums, but directly on the
warp beam--it's not sectional. It has received a couple coats of
furniture oil, but that's it, and nothing recently.
I'd suspect that the oil has done it. I'd remove the ropes, wash them and
the braking area with soap & water. Try to keep any oils, waxes, grease and
silicones out of the brakes, the ropes and the area that the ropes touch. If
you wash the ropes, weight them and hang to dry.
If the oil continues to wick up to the surface you may have to put a leather
or cotton strap around the beam to act as a brake drum surface, until the
oil is subdued.
Hope this gives you some ideas !

-- Happy Shuttling ! Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: rust preventer

Garth Fletcher
 

I think what you might be looking for is called:
"VPI" (Vapor Phase Inhibitor), also known as
"VCI" (Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors)

The basic idea is that the protective material slowly releases
vapors which deposit on the enclosed metal to inhibit rust.
Is available in the form of papers, films, and "emitters" which
can be enclosed in other wrappings.

An AltaVista search for "+VPI +packaging +corrosion" yielded many
matches, including:

http://www.daubertvci.com/
http://www.roncolabs.com/
http://www.greatlakespkgsys.com/Products/VCI-Papers.htm

A brief summary copied from the Daubert VCI site:

"The term "VCI" stands for Volatile Corrosion Inhibitor.

The chemicals in Daubert VCI products are volatile. When metals are wrapped or
packaged in VCI, the chemicals volatilize in the packaging environment, forming
a protective molecular layer on the surface of the metal. This protective layer
serves as a barrier, preventing moisture, salt, dirt, oxygen, and other
corrosion causing materials from depositing directly on the metal and causing
rust and corrosion.

Airtight packing is not required!

Simply store or ship metal parts in VCI packaging. When the parts are unwrapped,
the protective layer immediately begins to dissipate. The metal parts are clean,
corrosion-free and ready to use. No washing, dipping or cleaning is necessary. "


Another approach is to remove moisture; this usually requires air-tight
packaging plus "dessicant" bags to absorb what small amounts of moisture creep in.

Finally, there are anti-corrosion greases and coatings which can be applied
to exposed metal. Depending on the thickness and exposure these can provide
protection for a number of years. The longer lasting coatings tend to be thick
and greasy - something you want to remove before putting the machine back into
use...

Hope this helps
--
Garth Fletcher, President, JacqCAD International
288 Marcel Road, Mason, NH 03048-4704
(603) 878-4749 fax: (603) 878-0547
JacqCAD MASTER website: www.JacqCAD.com


rope brakes

willgee@...
 

Hi... the only thing I've ever seen applied to rope brakes that made
any sense was powdered rosin...the stuff that keeps gymnasts and
ballerinas from slipping on the wooden floor. glen


Re: Re : Silicones/Friction Brakes

Holly <holly@...>
 

Bill writes:

<<Re the brake, did you change the ropes and possibly change direction
on how they're wound on the brake drum ?>>

I have moved a couple times (OK, actually 6 :) since first setting up
the brake system, and always check the magazine article to make sure
it's set up right. Doesn't work at all when it's wound backwards. I've
also tried winding the cord an extra time (article specified 3 wraps,
I've tried 4, there's not really room for 5 with my warp sticks) with
very little additional friction added, not enough to keep the tension
good.

<<Have the brake drums been refinished ? >>

The ropes are not actually wound on the brake drums, but directly on the
warp beam--it's not sectional. It has received a couple coats of
furniture oil, but that's it, and nothing recently.

<<Are the ropes old and possibly have a glaze on them ?>>

I just checked. There's no visible residue or sign of wear or polish
due to useage. It's heavy cotton cord, about 6.5 mm in diameter.

Holly


Re : Silicones/Friction Brakes

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

Walt is right.
Re Silicone , Bruce Johnson, the expert antique furniture restorer and
author says not to put silicone anything on wood. I also avoid any product
in a spray can except Deft lacquer. Paraffin wax and Carnauba wax are good.

Re the brake, did you change the ropes and possibly change direction on how
they're wound on the brake drum ? Are the ropes old and possibly have a
glaze on them ? Have the brake drums been refinished ? I'd sand the wooden
drums with 80 or 100 grit paper, just where the ropes run.
I'd not put belt dressing on the drums, it's for metal pulleys and rubber
belts.

-- Happy Shuttling ! Bill Koepp in Central California


Update from Complex Weavers Website

Ingrid Boesel <ingrid@...>
 

I'm now working on the CW Seminars Website and it will hopefully be up and running by September 15. Registration will begin January 4th 2002.

I have put up a short opening page just to have something up there, but it apparently is not working right new.
I have been in and out of the website for the last week, testing, so that may be the problem. I will look into the missing opening page tonight (probably)


Ingrid Boesel

Complex Weavers
Web Chair
www.complex-weavers.org


Re: Cardboard tube weight

55wmt <55wmt@...>
 

The cardboard spools I use weigh about an ounce. However, I rip off one of
the end shoulders so that I can wind it like a cone rather than a spool. I
don't know what they would weigh with the shoulder still on, but I'm sure it
wouldn't be much more.

Angie Rockett

----- Original Message -----
From: "Robert & Robin" <ruddgonz@hollinet.com>
To: <weavetech@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 23, 2001 9:53 PM
Subject: [WeaveTech] Cardboard tube weight


Maybe someone can help. I have a small collection of partially used
spools (or are they considered cones?) of cotton rug warp that I want to use
for some rag rugs. I'm trying to figure out approximately how many yards
are left on each. I've weighed them all, but I don't know how much the
cardboard tube in the center weighs. These are the standard 4 1/4" tall
spools. I would just "wing it" if I was sure I had plenty of yardage, but I
may not have quite enough.

If anyone knows approximately what these weigh, let me know soon (I have
to prepare my warp chains before Monday a.m.).

Thanks,
Robin






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Re: AVL - overhead beater out of true

Holly <holly@...>
 

Walt writes:

<<Please, don't use silicon spray or oil or other lubricant intended for
metal parts, where wood slides on wood or where wood and metal slide
against each other. >>

I wonder what you would recommend for my problem? My friction break
never worked properly, so eventually I changed over to the 'warp
weights' method explained by Kati Meek in an old issue (Nov 88 I think)
of Handwoven. A thick cord wraps around the warp beam several times,
and is attached to a bar with weights on one side, a counter weight on
the other.

When this method works, it's wonderful! But I've recently had too much
slippage, even when adding weights. My dh bought some belt dressing,
but I've been reluctant to use it--don't know much about wood, but I
guess it just didn't feel right to me. Haven't done a lot of weaving in
a long time, but have some projects in mind pretty soon. However, this
problem is definitely worse when dry weather and/or central heating is
on. Living in Michigan, that's not too long now.......

Any suggestions?

Holly
http://www.hjsstudio.com
http://www.shaltzfarm.com


Photos

jcj0614@...
 

If you have an ID with Yahoo you can bookmark the photos by going to
the web site that Deb mentioned and put in your ID and password. It
will take you to the photo page. You can then bookmark that page and
it will come up without re-doing your ID and password.

It does work. Thanks Deb for the info.


Judy Jones


Re: plastic bags with rust inhibitor

Susan Lee-Bechtold <Susan.Lee-Bechtold@...>
 

They are available from Hollinger Corporation in Richmond, VA, a company in this area (DC) named L. Gordon Packaging, and I would imagine a lot of other conservation supply catalogs would be carrying them, the product is called Intercept, and is put in film or on board, so far as I know.-the other Su


my e-mail address (despite what it says in the from box) is Susan.Lee-Bechtold@nara.gov


Re: silicon spray

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

Walt wrote:

Please, don't use silicon spray or oil or other lubricant intended for
metal parts, where wood slides on wood or where wood and metal slide
against each other. The silicon spray etc. will attack the finish,
stain the wood and can swell the wood to in time causing more binding.
They can also soften the wood causing faster
wear.
This is fascinating b/c at least one loom manufacturer (Schacht) specifically recommends using silicon spray to improve the sliding where wood meets metal. The specific instance was to spray the metal tracks that hold the (wood frame) shafts.

However, I'm betting Walt knows what he's talking about. He's a master woodworker--I use a sliding bench he built for me to use at my 48" AVL, and it's made sitting at the AVL a treat compared to the torture of the flat bench that comes w/ the AVL. If I were to do it over again, I would order the AVL without a bench, then get one that really fits.

Another bit of info: Walt's sliding benches are much more reasonably priced than Fireside's. He's usually at Md Sheep & Wool and has been in the vendor area of the last couple of Convergences.

Usual disclaimer--just a *really* satisfied customer.

Ruth


Re: AVL - overhead beater out of true

Walter Turpening <walt.turpening@...>
 

Date: Wed, 22 Aug 2001 20:32:12 +0800
From: "Jim Stovall" <jimstovall1@juno.com>
Subject: Re: AVL - overhead beater out of true
...
When desperate, I have been known to lubricate the pieces that were
binding by rubbing dry soap on the wood (for lack of silicon spray or
other remedies) to reduce the friction.
...
Please, don't use silicon spray or oil or other lubricant intended for
metal parts, where wood slides on wood or where wood and metal slide
against each other. The silicon spray etc. will attack the finish,
stain the wood and can swell the wood to in time causing more binding.
They can also soften the wood causing faster
wear.

The soap technique is Ok if it is Ivory or other very mild soap. I
suggest using a good hard paste wax that is recommended for wood
floors. Or in a pinch use parafin (Gulfwax found in canning supplies).
I use parafin on the soles of my metal planes to ease the effort planing
wood.

Walt Turpening
Benches, Stools and Chairs
Kingsport, Tennessee


Re: Trip to England

bksnapa@...
 

In my recent trip to England I discovered working museums of the Lancashire
textile industry-the cradle of the industrial revolution. I visited the
Helmshore Textile Museums which includes both an early water driven fulling
mill and a later steam-driven cotton spinning mill. There is also a sister
museum, The Queen Street Mill in Burnley, a classic steam-driven weaving
mill which will definately be on my schedule on my next trip over. Highly
recommended.
Information on these museums is probably available from the Lancashire County
Council. The phone # of the museums are Helmshore: (01706)226459.
Queen Street Mill (01282) 412555
They would fit in well with visits to the Yorkshire Dales and the Lake
District.
Barbara


Re: ADMIN: The definitive guide to working with Yahoo

MartyCP@...
 

Thanks, Ruth. This was very helpful!

Marty


Re: Weaving Huck Lace

MartyCP@...
 

In a message dated 8/24/01 7:38:53 AM, sfsaulson@aol.com writes:

<< Does anyone have any experience weaving huck lace where the warp is a
thicker
yarn than the weft? >>

I think that huck lace is a balanced weave, which means the warp and weft
have to be the same size.

Marty


Weaving Huck Lace

sfsaulson@...
 

Does anyone have any experience weaving huck lace where the warp is a thicker
yarn than the weft? In my current sample, the warp is 5/2 perle cotton and
the weft was 20/2 perle cotton. But the warp ends didn't pull together to
make nice lace windows. In case you're wondering why I'm pursuing this, it's
because I'm painting the warp, and I'm interested in emphasizing the warp by
using a thicker yarn.
Thanks for your ideas.
Sarah Saulson


AVL overhead beater out of true

Elizabeth Tritthart <etritthart@...>
 

I had the same problem on my loom -- my pins had been twisted during shipping....
Took the unit off of the wood and brought to local metalsmith with a vice.... where they were straightened out for me.
Things have been fine ever since.

Eliz


Re: Cardboard tube weight

Lynne E. Chick <lchick@...>
 

I've weighed them all, but I don't know how much the cardboard tube in the
center weighs. These are the standard 4 1/4" tall spools.
If anyone knows approximately what these weigh, let me know soon (I have to
prepare my warp chains before Monday a.m.).

I weighed a little bigger one, and it weighs barely an ounce, so I'd say the
4 1/4" one would weigh about a half ounce.

Lynne in Maine