Date   

Re: Wave Stick

Louise Yale
 

The wave stick has not arrived yet but I am thinking of yarns with a bit
of texture and traction in the warp and possibly the weft.
No smooth yarns.

Thanks to The Woolery for taking my order and shipping so promptly.

Louise in NorCal

--------

That’s really cool looking... I think it would make great scarves and
holiday table runners and banners! I never thought much about the wave
beaters before, but you’ve changed my mind.

I think the cardboard cut to match sounds like a good idea ... and
hemstitching...

kathyo







Re: Wave Stick

kathyo
 

That’s really cool looking... I think it would make great scarves and holiday table runners and banners! I never thought much about the wave beaters before, but you’ve changed my mind.

I think the cardboard cut to match sounds like a good idea ... and hemstitching...

kathyo


Re: Wave Stick

Margaret Welch
 

Could you cut a cardboard complement to sit in the bottom until you were ready to cut off?  And hemstitch the beginning, of course.    Meg Welch

On Nov 2, 2020, at 12:21 PM, Sally O <s.orgren@...> wrote:

alternative.


Re: Wave Stick

Igor Raven
 

Very intriguing piece of work.

The combination of variegated yarn and an uneven or wavy fell line worked very well together. Something will have to try now. Thank you for sharing.


On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 9:23 AM Sally O <s.orgren@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

I bought the Ashford wavy stick shuttle at Midwest Weavers last summer (2019) after first seeing it at Convergence Reno in 2018, and then again at Rhinebeck last fall, where it was being elegantly demonstrated by a vendor (photo attached).

I believe the variegated yarn used at Rhinebeck is also an Ashford product, and I think length of each color was approximately 18". I have heard that there is a different product that can be used when beginning weaving with this wavy stick shuttle to secure the waves - so the weft doesn't slip along the warps. (Packing those spots at the beginning & end probably also works.)

I hope someone else recalls what that securing yarn or product is, or if there is an alternative.




Note that this particular product as two sides, one set of waves is tighter than when using the other side.


Re: Wave Stick

Sally O
 
Edited

I bought the Ashford wavy stick shuttle at Midwest Weavers last summer (2019) after first seeing it at Convergence Reno in 2018, and then again at Rhinebeck last fall, where it was being elegantly demonstrated by a vendor (photo attached).

I believe the variegated yarn used at Rhinebeck is also an Ashford product, and I think length of each color was approximately 18". I have heard that there is a different product that can be used when beginning weaving with this wavy stick shuttle to secure the waves - so the weft doesn't slip along the warps. (Packing those spots at the beginning & end probably also works.)

I hope someone else recalls what that securing yarn or product is, or if there is an alternative.



Note that this particular product has two sides, one set of waves is tighter than the other side.


Wave Stick

Louise Yale
 

Anyone use one of these?

Any recommendations on brand? length??

See Handwoven Nov/Dec 2020 page 20-22 for details.

Louise in NorCal


Re: Loom Manufacturer Identification

Claudia Cocco
 


Thanks!


On Wed, Oct 28, 2020 at 7:10 PM Jayne F <jhfpf@...> wrote:

Bernat Looms

 

 

From: weavetech@groups.io [mailto:weavetech@groups.io] On Behalf Of Claudia Cocco
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 8:00 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Loom Manufacturer Identification

 

Can anyone identify the manufacturer associated with this logo? It is on a loom that requires a little TLC and potentially replacement parts.

Many thanks in advance for any assistance provided!

Claudia


Re: Loom Manufacturer Identification

Claudia Cocco
 

Thanks!

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 9:03 PM Pat Bullen <spinningwitch24@...> wrote:
I knew it looked familiar.  I have one from around 1935.
Lots of similarities between it and the Belmont and the Baby Wolf
except the finger-like lams.

image.png


Re: Paris bistro chairs

Sally O
 

I'll consider it.
(Once I figure it out fully!)

Still tumbling down the hole...


Re: Beiderwand

Laurie Schellinger
 

Thanks.


On Thu, Oct 29, 2020, 8:59 PM Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:
Since you have different ratios - real Beiderwand is a subset of lampas with
a ratio of 4:1, both layers plain weave. You would add the layers together
for the sett, which would not be double, but, say 24 for the ground and 6
for the secondary warps, you'd have 30 epi.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs








Re: Loom Manufacturer Identification

Pat Bullen
 

I knew it looked familiar.  I have one from around 1935.
Lots of similarities between it and the Belmont and the Baby Wolf
except the finger-like lams.

image.png


Re: Beiderwand

Sara von Tresckow
 

Since you have different ratios - real Beiderwand is a subset of lampas with
a ratio of 4:1, both layers plain weave. You would add the layers together
for the sett, which would not be double, but, say 24 for the ground and 6
for the secondary warps, you'd have 30 epi.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


Beiderwand

Laurie Schellinger
 

I am weaving Beiderwand for the first time and I have a sett question. Do I consider it Double Weave so my sett is twice that of plan weave?


Fiber Designer Loom

Terry Slagel <terryslagel@...>
 

Triple Border
I am trying to assemble a Fiber Designer loom. If you have knowledge of these looms, will you please contact me? Specifically, I need help with the brake, treadle tie up system, foot beam direction, one beam length piece that I am unsure of it's function. Thank you.

Terry Slagel
www.FallRiverFibers.com
www.ChautauquaCraftsmen.org
Hot Springs ACE Hardware

"All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us."         Gandalf, J.R.R. Tolkien
Triple Border
Paperless PostYahoo Mail Stationery


Re: Loom Manufacturer Identification

Jayne F
 

Bernat Looms

 

 

From: weavetech@groups.io [mailto:weavetech@groups.io] On Behalf Of Claudia Cocco
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 8:00 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Loom Manufacturer Identification

 

Can anyone identify the manufacturer associated with this logo? It is on a loom that requires a little TLC and potentially replacement parts.

Many thanks in advance for any assistance provided!

Claudia


Loom Manufacturer Identification

Claudia Cocco
 

Can anyone identify the manufacturer associated with this logo? It is on a loom that requires a little TLC and potentially replacement parts.

Many thanks in advance for any assistance provided!

Claudia


Re: Paris bistro chairs

Su Butler
 

Sounds interesting Sally…..will you be writing up your findings for a journal or magazine so we can all see what you have done??

 

Best,

Su Butler 😊

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Paris bistro chairs

Sally O
 
Edited

Just a follow up to this thread if anyone is still interested...

The answer is yes! the "Prestige" caning pattern can be woven on a shaft loom with fibers!
It is not mad-weave, triaxial, or cannele/spider weave, all of which I have woven before.

Because the patterns Barbara W shared appear to be computer-generated, and caning uses flatter and stiffer materials, the sample I wove has far more dimension than I was expecting.

Other surprises:
- The bottom of the cloth is different than the top, and depending on how I interlace the diagonal threads (the exact order), I can produce two different patterns on the reverse side without affecting the top.
- The treadling is the same for all picks – that means one of the warp sets does not have to be threaded on any shaft for this particular pattern. However, to keep the structure from compressing when beating, I am considering entering a "hidden" pick on the opposite shed to stabilize the web, as long as it won't show on the surface.
- "Placing" the weft is required, not beating.
- I had to start and finish with a single strand of color for the diagonal threads to end at the selvedges correctly, not a pair.
- I am unsure how much of a time saving measure this method actually provides by using the loom to control tension and provide shedding for half the picks. Are there industrial looms that can produce caning patterns? The trick is those diagonal threads have to move across the warps, but not in the same way as traditional wefts.

Thanks to Jayne F for sharing the Handwoven article by David Mooney, as that gave me a big clue how to set up the diagonal threads before beginning.

When I have completed the first sample, I think I am going to cut off and contemplate additional explorations. I have been in contact with some basketmakers and will be investigating more folks with experience in caning. (The link to Silver River was great, they have two patterns that are not the same as the one Barbara shared, but of interest: Lace and Daisy. Another, called "Star of David"

BIG thanks for the push down this rabbit hole...I think ;-)

Sally O


Re: Sandpaper Beam?

Lorelei Caracausa
 

Just an aside, nothing really to do with your issue, but I have Paul O'Connors original 16s AVL.  Definitely working thru issues and thankful I already had a knowledge base with the AVLs.  But,  watching the loom work as I was weaving, I noticed a "fluctuation" on the whorl holding the right treadle cable.  Not sure how or why, but somehow, the whorl had wallered out, so that one side of the pulley/whorl, was vacant.  The hole thru the wood was conical.  Not even sure why or how that could have happened, but it allowed the wooden whorl to lean at an unacceptable angle, and throw the cable.  When DH and I took it apart and looked at it, someone, somewhere, had also almost sawed thru the stainless rod that holds the 2 whorls in place. Certainly not wear related- lots of work with a metal cutting blade.  Now replaced. Kinda makes ya wonder


On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 7:38 PM bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@...> wrote:
Thanks to everyone who answered my pleas for help.  As several people
have suggested, the culprit was the cloth storage system.  I think
that my sandpaper beam has lost enough of it's tooth to be a factor in
the problem.  The beam works if the cloth storage is working, but if
the pull from the storage system is reduced too much, it doesn't work.
I should have seen this, and actually anticipated it, but I had a few
senior moments.  The story on the cloth storage system on this loom is
this.
About a year ago, I was weaving along, and suddenly the weight hit the
floor.  I checked the pawl and ratchet, cord, etc. All looked OK.
Some disassembly and more inspection showed that the wooden disc that
the cord rolls up on to raise the weight was rotating on its axle.
Further, the outer end of the axle had rusted, the increase in size
caused by the rust would not let the axle move through the loom frame,
and I could not get the disc off the axle.  So it didn't work and I
couldn't remove it to fix it.  I wondered if I could use this in a
"manual" fashion; just rolling up the cord whenever I advanced warp.
The answer was yes, it worked.  However, I realized that the disc
would continue to loosen, and eventually would not hold enough tension
to work.  I hoped at that time that I could get the disc off the axle.
I promptly went back to work on the loom, and forgot about this entire
train of thought.  The weight went in a corner, a dog put a dog bed on
it, and it became habit to tighten the cord.  When it stopped working
I didn't have a clue until I saw the posts about the cloth storage.  I
was able to work the disc off the axle, pull it through the frame,
reglued the axle to the disc (I drove the rusted end of the axle into
the disc) and all is well until the next crisis.  Thanks again!
Sandra







--
Lorelei


Re: Sandpaper Beam?

bigwhitesofadog
 

Thanks to everyone who answered my pleas for help. As several people
have suggested, the culprit was the cloth storage system. I think
that my sandpaper beam has lost enough of it's tooth to be a factor in
the problem. The beam works if the cloth storage is working, but if
the pull from the storage system is reduced too much, it doesn't work.
I should have seen this, and actually anticipated it, but I had a few
senior moments. The story on the cloth storage system on this loom is
this.
About a year ago, I was weaving along, and suddenly the weight hit the
floor. I checked the pawl and ratchet, cord, etc. All looked OK.
Some disassembly and more inspection showed that the wooden disc that
the cord rolls up on to raise the weight was rotating on its axle.
Further, the outer end of the axle had rusted, the increase in size
caused by the rust would not let the axle move through the loom frame,
and I could not get the disc off the axle. So it didn't work and I
couldn't remove it to fix it. I wondered if I could use this in a
"manual" fashion; just rolling up the cord whenever I advanced warp.
The answer was yes, it worked. However, I realized that the disc
would continue to loosen, and eventually would not hold enough tension
to work. I hoped at that time that I could get the disc off the axle.
I promptly went back to work on the loom, and forgot about this entire
train of thought. The weight went in a corner, a dog put a dog bed on
it, and it became habit to tighten the cord. When it stopped working
I didn't have a clue until I saw the posts about the cloth storage. I
was able to work the disc off the axle, pull it through the frame,
reglued the axle to the disc (I drove the rusted end of the axle into
the disc) and all is well until the next crisis. Thanks again!
Sandra