Date   

AVL/Fiberworks interface question

Martha Town
 

I currently run an AVL FDL with a CD1 using an iMac on High Sierra 10.13.6 and Fiberworks SilverPlus 1.1.1.  It all works fine!
I am buying a used AVL Workshop Dobby Loom with a CD4.  It comes with the Serial to USB connection cord.  Will I be able to use the same  iMac to run this loom? 
Is anyone else using one computer to run two looms (not at the same time of course...there is only one of me. ha!)   Any advice??
TIA


Re: Equipment question

NORMA STALEY
 

I am guessing handles for 'Bermuda' bags.
A pair are used for each bag. 
There may be another name for the cloth bags.

On Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 08:09:35 AM EDT, P George <patriceny@...> wrote:





On Sep 15, 2021, at 12:13 AM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:



They are bag handles. here is a photo. The roundness of what you see here is because they were made by my Father and he changed the design a bit.

<image001.jpg>

<image002.jpg>

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 


Re: Weave Point Question

bigwhitesofadog
 

What is the process line?
Sandra


Re: Equipment question

P George
 




On Sep 15, 2021, at 12:13 AM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:



They are bag handles. here is a photo. The roundness of what you see here is because they were made by my Father and he changed the design a bit.

<image001.jpg>

<image002.jpg>

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 


Re: Equipment question

Sara von Tresckow
 

They are bag handles. here is a photo. The roundness of what you see here is because they were made by my Father and he changed the design a bit.

A picture containing indoor, bag, accessory

Description automatically generated

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 


More about historic sail textiles

alaskajean1
 

Hi, again! 

We think Nat found the correct source for Louie's statement.  He didn't tell me whether it was in the Postrel or the Barber book.  However, it was more talking about the difficulty of spinning with the walking wheel and indicated that it was easy to spin a loosely twisted yarn, but to do a tightly twisted one was more difficult.  Therefore,  the yarn was of poorer quality than when it came from a drop spindlle.

Again, thanks to all who answered my question.
  Jean


Re: Equipment question

Elizabeth Moncrief
 

Not true ‘Angel Wings’ but they could be used to secure flat lease sticks.  I have a set that I purchased at a Convergence 20 years ago that look something like these. One for each side and you secure the leases themselves with bubbler bands on the outside of these holders.  Or if the leases have holes, you use shoe laces or cords to secure them.  These  holders keep them well separated. 

Liz Moncrief



 


On Sep 14, 2021, at 6:42 PM, Janet Stollnitz <janet@...> wrote:



These are not Angel Wings. Purrington Looms (https://www.purringtonlooms.com/Angel_Wings.htm) makes Angel Wings.

 

Janet

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Diane de Souza
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 7:36 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Equipment question

 

These are part of some equipment in an estate sale - I have no idea what they are - any ideas? 

They are about 11" long and there are 25 of them.


Re: Equipment question

Janet Stollnitz
 

These are not Angel Wings. Purrington Looms (https://www.purringtonlooms.com/Angel_Wings.htm) makes Angel Wings.

 

Janet

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Diane de Souza
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 7:36 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Equipment question

 

These are part of some equipment in an estate sale - I have no idea what they are - any ideas? 

They are about 11" long and there are 25 of them.


Re: Equipment question

Sharon Schulze
 

Angel wings generally have some sort of clamp on them, don’t they? I am wondering if they are perhaps pieces from a hobby setup? I don’t have one, but it kind of looks like that I think.


On Sep 14, 2021, at 8:51 PM, Lorelei Caracausa <beeweaverstudio@...> wrote:

think they call them "angel wings"...to hold lease sticks

On Tue, Sep 14, 2021 at 6:35 PM Diane de Souza <dyeingtoweave@...> wrote:
These are part of some equipment in an estate sale - I have no idea what they are - any ideas? 

They are about 11" long and there are 25 of them.

<IMG_0619.jpeg>




--
Lorelei


Re: Equipment question

Lorelei Caracausa
 

think they call them "angel wings"...to hold lease sticks


On Tue, Sep 14, 2021 at 6:35 PM Diane de Souza <dyeingtoweave@...> wrote:
These are part of some equipment in an estate sale - I have no idea what they are - any ideas? 

They are about 11" long and there are 25 of them.



--
Lorelei


Equipment question

Diane de Souza
 

These are part of some equipment in an estate sale - I have no idea what they are - any ideas? 

They are about 11" long and there are 25 of them.


Re: Weave Point Question

Janell Neulinger
 

I have had way more than that open at once, and it works fine but there is a definite downside to not having a ‘window list’ to navigate directly to the one  you are interested in. 


—janell


Re: Weave Point Question

Doreen McLaughlin
 

            I’ve had up to 5 WeavePoint windows open at the same time. The great thing is that the Copy function works for all so you can Copy in one and Paste in a different one.

Doreen


Re: Weave Point Question

Janell Neulinger
 

I haven’t used earlier versions of Weavepoint but are you asking about the way that WP will only let you have one open draft? The solution is to open multiple instances of the software, each with its own draft. You will be able to copy across from one to another. 


—janell


Weave Point Question

Lise
 

Hi.

I bear the newest Weave Point  >   Weave point 8

I used to work with two active WeavePoints's if I I wanted to work with difficult things such as duplicate from one WP to the other WP.

The one WeavePoint I do not use I set in proces line. I was always able to use one of the active WP's from procesline.

Now I can only work with one on screen. I find it strange and I miss the possibility.

Hope you understand it is a bit difficult to explain.

LIse


--
Denne mail er kontrolleret for vira af AVG.
http://www.avg.com


Historic Spinning question

alaskajean1
 

Thanks for all the replies.

The stat I've most heard regarding the time to spin versus time to weave is that it took 7 spinners working full-time to keep one weaver busy.  That does not specifically relate to cloth for sails, but just in general.  Nat, who is doing the majority of the work to complete Louie's book has cited the Postrel book (which Louie wouldn't have had access to as it was printed after he passed away), so I'll pass this on to him to check.

The comment about the value of the sails comes thru in all the information Louie had gathered, not just among the Norse. 

Again, thanks.  I'm fortunate to have this way to ask questions and get info. 

Jean


Re: More about historic sail textiles

jody Williams
 

Thank you for The Swan.  The Osberg Ship, dug up from the protective mud was intact except for sails.  After much study and speculation, the archeologists have decided it had woolen sails.

Jody Williams

On Sep 12, 2021, at 7:32 AM, P George <patriceny@...> wrote:

Historic sails seem to be a popular topic now!
Here is a story posted about a 120yr old herring-fishing ship named The Swan, by The Global Yell, a wonderful textile blog from Shetland. https://www.globalyell.org/blog/swan
 
The story mentions a finishing process formerly used in Shetlan called “cutch” that helped to protect and strengthen sails.
 
Thought everyone who enjoyed our recent thread on spinning for sailing textile would want to see this too!
 
Bests,
Patrice George


More about historic sail textiles

P George
 

Historic sails seem to be a popular topic now!

Here is a story posted about a 120yr old herring-fishing ship named The Swan, by The Global Yell, a wonderful textile blog from Shetland. https://www.globalyell.org/blog/swan

 

The story mentions a finishing process formerly used in Shetlan called “cutch” that helped to protect and strengthen sails.

 

Thought everyone who enjoyed our recent thread on spinning for sailing textile would want to see this too!

 

Bests,

Patrice George


Re: Historic Spinning question

Colleen Sorensen
 

Jean, and all,

I do not have access to the book that has been referred to concerning spinning for sails, and I do not spin, however there is a recent book which discusses spinning in history: The Fabric of Civilization, by Virginia Postrel.  On page 49, she gives chart of the time to spin items. She lists a sail as 60 miles of thread.

On a Charka, with cotton (100meters/hour) - 1540 hours (193 days).
With a Spinning Wheel, wool, medium (91 meters and hours) 1692 hours (211 days).
...
Viking, wool, coarse, woven at 50 meters an hour: 3088 hours (385 days).

She has copious notes. I found the book fascinating. The chapters are: Fiber, Thread, Cloth, Dye, Traders, Consumers, Innovators. 

Colleen


Re: Historic Spinning question

Sara von Tresckow
 

We have visited the Danish ship museum in Roskilde a few times. Each visit,
ostensibly to see ships, winds up a trip to view the latest in research with
warp weighted looms and tests of "sail cloth".
In 2017 there was wool on the loom, in 2019 there was linen. It seems there
is no really definitive answer to "Viking" sail materials because none or
only tiny frargments have been found. Apparently making the sails was so
time consuming that if a boat were lost or used in a ceremonial burial, the
sails were passed on until nothing was left.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs

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