Date   

Floating Lams

Sara von Tresckow
 

I don’t have this feature – it can be ordered. I think it is something best done with vertical countermarche.

 

 

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 


Re: Double countermarch

Elizabeth Moncrief
 

Thanks Sara
Ive just learned that this setup is used on the HD rug loom, designed by Collingwood…tho he wrote this piece that I was referring to in the Quarterly Journal in Britain in 1957, long before he was working with HD on the loom. What a guy.

I also realized that if I put all lams side by side on one rod, then I can’t use Kati Meek’s ingenious tieup system, using only half of the cords. Mine is a Toika and has the upper lams corded to the bottom shaft bar but the lower lams corded to the jacks or coupers. I guess I’m not sure on your explanation of the lower lams on your Cyrus. Would you be willing to send me a photo of what you’re describing?
Thanks so much for your response. Looms Mechanics are my thing.😊

Liz Moncrief
Www.aweaversway.com
Instagram: moncriefliz

On Aug 18, 2021, at 6:31 PM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@woolgatherers.com> wrote:

I once owned a Glimakra "Aktiv" that had all the lams at one level, 2 per
shaft. It worked, but I can't say that it was decidedly better or worse than
having the lams at two levels. You still have the lams pivoting on one side
of the loom.
What does make a difference is to use half floating lams as on the Cranbrook
looms where the upper set rides on the lower shaft bars, or the Ulla Cyrus
where both sets ride up and down. The upper ones ride the lower shaft bars
like the Cranbrook and the lower lams are supported by two cords coming from
the shafts.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs







Re: Double countermarch

Sara von Tresckow
 

I once owned a Glimakra "Aktiv" that had all the lams at one level, 2 per
shaft. It worked, but I can't say that it was decidedly better or worse than
having the lams at two levels. You still have the lams pivoting on one side
of the loom.
What does make a difference is to use half floating lams as on the Cranbrook
looms where the upper set rides on the lower shaft bars, or the Ulla Cyrus
where both sets ride up and down. The upper ones ride the lower shaft bars
like the Cranbrook and the lower lams are supported by two cords coming from
the shafts.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


Re: Shopping help

Teresa Ruch
 

I carry Tencel 20/2 both dyed skeins and undyed cones. Please email for a bulk price list.
also carry 5/2, 3/2 and 10/2

On Wed, Aug 18, 2021 at 6:22 PM Pat via groups.io <knitspinweave=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Does anyone know of a source for 20/2 Tencel or rayon?   I have some I purchased in 2015 from a business that is now closed and I would like some more.

Pat Brown


Shopping help

Pat
 

Does anyone know of a source for 20/2 Tencel or rayon?   I have some I purchased in 2015 from a business that is now closed and I would like some more.

Pat Brown


Double countermarch

Elizabeth Moncrief
 

I’m considering moving the two sets of lams to one pivot point and adjusting the cords to make it a ‘double countermarch’ as described by Collingwood in a 1957 piece.  Does anyone have A double CM or has anyone converted theirs?  I may just do it in between warps but would love to know advantages or disadvantages if there are any.  I have plenty of room to move and interspace the lower lams to the upper rod (or everything to the lower pivot rod?) and the concept intrigues me.  

Liz Moncrief
Www.aweaversway.com 
Instagram:  moncriefliz


 


On Aug 18, 2021, at 8:18 AM, Sally O <s.orgren@...> wrote:

A new weaver asked me if "broken twill" was the correct term to use for her weaving "structure" after she completed samples from a recent workshop. The instructor provided the draft and used that term, so in that context I thought it was okay.

However, I did not see the actual draft. That got me to thinking, could "broken twill" actually mean a variety of different structures? In other words, it's a pretty broad term, right? When searching the term in Handweaving.net, a whole variety of patterns come up, some with a straight draw threading where the twill break happens in the treadling, and some with the break happening in the tie-up.

Yes, I floundered about with my edition of Emery in the pursuit of an anwer.

While asking this question, I am thrown back to thinking about Sara von Treskow's presentation at CWS in Maryland many years ago. She presented a draft naming system that was very precise by identifying the floats, warp or weft, in order, as part of the naming convention. With the resulting name, you immediately knew a lot more about the structure construction without even seeing a draft.

The new weaver was seeking a simple answer to complete her sample sheet - but her question left me with more questions.

Sally


Re: Weaving terms for structures

Subu
 

I was taught, albeit years ago, that the term broken twill meant that a twill structure was being woven but the usual twill line was broken either in warp or weft.  It did not matter if the break was due to threading or treadling, as any weave structure is determined by the actual interlacement of the threads, not by a single element of the whole.  There are variations on the way broken twill can be created, just like there are myriad variations on a twill……so the broad term, broken twill, was used in the correct context, imho.

 

Su 😊

 

From: weavetech@groups.io On Behalf Of Sally O
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2021 10:19 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Weaving terms for structures

 

A new weaver asked me if "broken twill" was the correct term to use for her weaving "structure" after she completed samples from a recent workshop. The instructor provided the draft and used that term, so in that context I thought it was okay.

However, I did not see the actual draft. That got me to thinking, could "broken twill" actually mean a variety of different structures? In other words, it's a pretty broad term, right? When searching the term in Handweaving.net, a whole variety of patterns come up, some with a straight draw threading where the twill break happens in the treadling, and some with the break happening in the tie-up.

Yes, I floundered about with my edition of Emery in the pursuit of an anwer.

While asking this question, I am thrown back to thinking about Sara von Treskow's presentation at CWS in Maryland many years ago. She presented a draft naming system that was very precise by identifying the floats, warp or weft, in order, as part of the naming convention. With the resulting name, you immediately knew a lot more about the structure construction without even seeing a draft.

The new weaver was seeking a simple answer to complete her sample sheet - but her question left me with more questions.

Sally


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Weaving terms for structures

Sally O
 

A new weaver asked me if "broken twill" was the correct term to use for her weaving "structure" after she completed samples from a recent workshop. The instructor provided the draft and used that term, so in that context I thought it was okay.

However, I did not see the actual draft. That got me to thinking, could "broken twill" actually mean a variety of different structures? In other words, it's a pretty broad term, right? When searching the term in Handweaving.net, a whole variety of patterns come up, some with a straight draw threading where the twill break happens in the treadling, and some with the break happening in the tie-up.

Yes, I floundered about with my edition of Emery in the pursuit of an anwer.

While asking this question, I am thrown back to thinking about Sara von Treskow's presentation at CWS in Maryland many years ago. She presented a draft naming system that was very precise by identifying the floats, warp or weft, in order, as part of the naming convention. With the resulting name, you immediately knew a lot more about the structure construction without even seeing a draft.

The new weaver was seeking a simple answer to complete her sample sheet - but her question left me with more questions.

Sally


Re: Weaving diagram in the book, Tuskaft

Regina Wegemund
 

Hello Louise, when I made such a piece I draw the edges at the side to the next step and then everything to the other side. And so on.... So at the end I had a very long thread that I fixed somehow and then cut. Hope you understand what I mean. But I think you can also make a nice knot at each side. When you take a special color or material for this thread it can give your piece a special design.

Regina

Am 17.08.2021 um 19:28 schrieb Louise Yale via groups.io:

Thank you, Regina.

Wove a small sample piece. Now, I will pull/draw together. Are the loops
that form on the edges just there as part of the design/decoration?

Louise



It is a plain weave with regularly inwoven threads (the black threads)
which you after finishing the work draw together.

Regina

Am 17.08.2021 um 04:57 schrieb Louise Yale via groups.io:
In the book, Tuskaft, on pages 108 and 109, a pleated fabric is shown.
Have used various translating sites but cannot figure out what causes
the
pleats.
...a technique? It looks like plain weave with an overshot
...a particular yarn?
...the finishing??
...something else?

Thanks.

Louise in NorCal
















Re: Weaving diagram in the book, Tuskaft

Louise Yale
 

Woven Shibori - Bingo !!

Thanks for the info on the yarns.
Louise in NorCal

Louise,

It is so called 'Woven Shibori'.
Yes, it is an overshot, woven with very strong, slippery yarn. That will
be pulled together before wet finishing.
The warp yarns are Nm 10/2 wool and Nm 10/2 silk, in stripes.
After finishing the overshot picks are removed.

Success!
Marian
In the book, Tuskaft, on pages 108 and 109, a pleated fabric is shown.
Have used various translating sites but cannot figure out what causes
the
pleats.
...a technique? It looks like plain weave with an overshot
...a particular yarn?
...the finishing??
...something else?

Thanks.

Louise in NorCal










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Dit e-mailbericht is gecontroleerd op virussen met Avast
antivirussoftware.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus







Re: Weaving diagram in the book, Tuskaft

Louise Yale
 

Thank you, Regina.

Wove a small sample piece. Now, I will pull/draw together. Are the loops
that form on the edges just there as part of the design/decoration?

Louise

It is a plain weave with regularly inwoven threads (the black threads)
which you after finishing the work draw together.

Regina

Am 17.08.2021 um 04:57 schrieb Louise Yale via groups.io:
In the book, Tuskaft, on pages 108 and 109, a pleated fabric is shown.
Have used various translating sites but cannot figure out what causes
the
pleats.
...a technique? It looks like plain weave with an overshot
...a particular yarn?
...the finishing??
...something else?

Thanks.

Louise in NorCal














Re: Double up Warp

bigwhitesofadog
 

Well folks, I didn't do this, at least not this time. I didn't
chicken out. I got it all set up, two cone holders with eight cones
each, and looked at them. The colors were different, but not very
much so. If I had been joining a blue/cream/violet/biege warp to a
pink/orange/gold/teal warp, it would have been a different outcome.
As it was, after all of the knot tying and moving conestands around, I
was going to have two sets of finished pieces that were very similar.
Instead, I combined the colors into one longer warp; blue/indigo;
cream/off white; lilac/purple; brown/biege. I have often combined
several similar colors in the warp, both to add color interest and to
make a longer warp out of smaller amounts of yarn (using up left
overs).
I will try this the next time I warp one of the AVLs (more room to
move things around under the loom) and report back.
Sandra


Re: Weaving diagram in the book, Tuskaft

Regina Wegemund
 

It is a plain weave with regularly inwoven threads (the black threads) which you after finishing the work draw together.

Regina

Am 17.08.2021 um 04:57 schrieb Louise Yale via groups.io:

In the book, Tuskaft, on pages 108 and 109, a pleated fabric is shown.
Have used various translating sites but cannot figure out what causes the
pleats.
...a technique? It looks like plain weave with an overshot
...a particular yarn?
...the finishing??
...something else?

Thanks.

Louise in NorCal









Re: Weaving diagram in the book, Tuskaft

Marion Stubenitsky
 

Louise,

It is so called 'Woven Shibori'.
Yes, it is an overshot, woven with very strong, slippery yarn. That will
be pulled together before wet finishing.
The warp yarns are Nm 10/2 wool and Nm 10/2 silk, in stripes.
After finishing the overshot picks are removed.

Success!
Marian
In the book, Tuskaft, on pages 108 and 109, a pleated fabric is shown.
Have used various translating sites but cannot figure out what causes the
pleats.
...a technique? It looks like plain weave with an overshot
...a particular yarn?
...the finishing??
...something else?

Thanks.

Louise in NorCal









--
Dit e-mailbericht is gecontroleerd op virussen met Avast antivirussoftware.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Weaving diagram in the book, Tuskaft

Louise Yale
 

In the book, Tuskaft, on pages 108 and 109, a pleated fabric is shown.
Have used various translating sites but cannot figure out what causes the
pleats.
...a technique? It looks like plain weave with an overshot
...a particular yarn?
...the finishing??
...something else?

Thanks.

Louise in NorCal


Re: Double up Warp

Joe P
 

Hi Everyone 

I do not see where the knots will be an issue The reed in the warping wheel is like a half reed open on the top the knots will fit because the wire will kind of move, I have a Leclerc tension box and again the reed is a half reed I have had a knot or two over the years slip by me 8/4 warp filling a section on the sectional warp beam. Good size knots 

I will try things I think will save me time once. I did below once 
1 tie boughts on the front of the heddles of the old warp 
2 leave enough warp length behind the heddles to tie new warp to old warp
3 warp the sectional warp beam 
4 then tie the new warp to the old warp behind the heddles 
5 pull the knots through the heddles and re tie on to the tie-on rod 

I did it once. I found I can thread heddles faster than I can tie knots I have some weaving friends that do the above thing all the time. with rug warp 

In my reading a lot, a lot of weaving shops in Europe thread a set of shafts once if it is a complex threading. they leave the heddles threaded so they can re tie on. They take the whole harness out of the loom and hang it up till they want to weave that pattern again they warp the loom put in the harness with the shafts threaded and tie on the new warp to old and pull it through heddles and tie it on done for years.

I would think a weaver could warp a section in a sectional beam. tie on the second warp warp fill that section as well and then tie on the new warp to the old warp It should be easy to figure out use some odd warps spool ends and try it filling one section. If the wear is doing this as a business the old warp ends are a tax write off. So, nothing is lost. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A.  

  



  


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Lorelei Caracausa <beeweaverstudio@...>
Sent: Friday, August 13, 2021 11:23 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Double up Warp
 
Janelle has a good point.  I have only done this with 20/2 cotton and 30/2 silk.  The knots were not an issue in these threads.

On Fri, Aug 13, 2021, 10:58 AM Janell Neulinger <janell.neulinger@...> wrote:

A potential pitfall that hasn’t come up yet is feeding the knots through the comb on the warping wheel when you beam each section.  It isn’t a problem for a knot here or there but a section-full of knots next to each other will be a little bulkier. I don’t think it should be a showstopper, but maybe a reason to go slow when you get close to the transition point.


I am eager to hear how this goes. 

—janell


Re: Double up Warp

Lorelei Caracausa
 

Janelle has a good point.  I have only done this with 20/2 cotton and 30/2 silk.  The knots were not an issue in these threads.


On Fri, Aug 13, 2021, 10:58 AM Janell Neulinger <janell.neulinger@...> wrote:

A potential pitfall that hasn’t come up yet is feeding the knots through the comb on the warping wheel when you beam each section.  It isn’t a problem for a knot here or there but a section-full of knots next to each other will be a little bulkier. I don’t think it should be a showstopper, but maybe a reason to go slow when you get close to the transition point.


I am eager to hear how this goes. 

—janell


Re: Double up Warp

Janell Neulinger
 

A potential pitfall that hasn’t come up yet is feeding the knots through the comb on the warping wheel when you beam each section.  It isn’t a problem for a knot here or there but a section-full of knots next to each other will be a little bulkier. I don’t think it should be a showstopper, but maybe a reason to go slow when you get close to the transition point.


I am eager to hear how this goes. 

—janell


Re: Double up Warp

bigwhitesofadog
 

To clarify;
I am not tying to an existing warp.  I'm starting with a clean loom.  I will wind warp for one section (four colors in the order blue, cream,violet, brown), using eight cones of 6/2 cotton, putting 24 doubled threads 12 yards long on the wheel.  This is a usual practice, and at this point, I would wind this on the beam.  Instead I will tie another set of eight cones in (as if I were just switching in a new cone) and wind on another 12 yards.  The new colors are indigo, taupe, purple, biege.  This whole 24 yard creation is now wound on.  I will not save any time in tying knots, winding, or beaming.  I will do the knotting standing comfortably in front of the loom, and 24 knots at a time.  I will also save the time usually spent trying to disentangle knotted threads.  I have had the tie on process go smoothly, and have had it tangle badly.  Having 8 feet (I'm putting a full wap on) of tangled threads is something I'd like to avoid.   This will be woven in the traditional Blooming Leaf pattern, as turned Taquette.
Working with a warping wheel is much different than other ways of winding warps.  When I started, I found it to be not intuitive,  and requiring carefull attention.  Now I can do it without much thought.  I never understood why sectional warping was popular until I tried the wheel.  It's fast and can be done with only one cone, although I  usually use. 4 -8, 
Sandra


Re: Double up Warp

Teresa Ruch
 

let us know how it works I am always up to looking into a new easier or faster method.
Teresa Ruch

On Thu, Aug 12, 2021 at 10:10 AM bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@...> wrote:
Thanks to all who replied.  Most who replied referred to using a plain beam and a whole, previously created warp.  Sectional warping with a wheel is much different.  I am trying to avoid the mass of untensioned threads that often seems to result from tying old to new.   Dealing with the knots as the sections are formed will keep everything under tension all the time and allow me to make 24 knots at a time instead of 1160 at once.
Sandra

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