Date   

Re: Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

Sharon Alderman
 

If I have a broken warp thread, I measure out a replacement thread, needle weave it into the warp, take it through the reed and the empty heddle and then tension it the same as its neighbors and use a hemostat to clamp it to its neighbors as far back as possible.  When the broken end is long enough I put it into the web and take out the repair warp end.

Hemostats are used in surgeries to clamp off little bleeding veins, but are handy for soldering small electronics pieces (no burned fingers) and for tying fishing flies, to name a few uses.  They can be expensive, but bought in large numbers at Firemountaingems.com are only a little more than a dollar.

Dangling things runs the risk of untwisting the yarn, and even more dangerous, attracting the eyes of cats who love to bat at such objects.

Sharon Alderman


Re: Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

bigwhitesofadog
 

I've always done what Sara does.  I keep a spool of whatever the warp is handy.  Two ply yarns untwist as easily as singles.  If you clamp a stick to the spool, and brace it against the loom, it won't untwist.  I do this with floating selvedges I forgot to beam.  But you have to keep minding these spools.  With the short thread method you're done in two operations.


Re: Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

Lorelei Caracausa
 

Sara, I have tried a variation on this, bit am curious how the "long tail" doesn't interfere with the shed?  Every time I have left any sort of extra tails or loops in the space between the back beam and the shafts, they tend to reach out and grab or wrap around other adjacent warps, and eventually making the distance from shaft to "tangle" so untenable that more warps snap.  


On Thu, Aug 27, 2020, 4:43 PM Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:

Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Re: Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

Gloria Pitt
 

I’ve always done the same as Elizabeth with hand-dyed warps, especially essential with singles yarns. I wind in a few extra before dyeing and leave them unthreaded hanging off the back of the loom as insurance.
Gloria ( in the UK)


Re: Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

Sara von Tresckow
 

Nan,

Maybe that seems to work, but tying on or using the repair warp and pinning assures that the warp end always has just the right tension as well. Those singly weighted ends cause tension issues and they continue the length of the warp.

Splicing and pinning gets you up and going quickly and accurately.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nann Miller
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 5:06 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

We estimate the length of the remaining warp, cut a warp yarn of that length, thread it from the back of the loom through the heddle and reed and thread it into the web for about an inch.  Then wind the remainder of that yarn onto an empty cone, slide a second empty cone of the same size over the top of the first.  This weights the yarn.  Then, and this is the important part: we take a long shoelace, drape it over the cones so it drags on the floor--thus preventing the untwisting/breaking.  I know it sounds unlikely, but it works--for any yarn I've ever tried, including singles.

Nann Miller

 


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Elizabeth Moncrief via groups.io <l.moncrief@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 5:53 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

Because I weave a lot of painted warps, I do just what Sara recommends...I wind 2-3 extra warp ends, paint the warp chain, wind it on and then pull those 2-3 ends off of the warp beam in equal measure to hang loose.  That way if you break a thread you have one right there to pick up AND it is in the same color sequence that you’re weaving.  Not doing so leaves you trying to find a replacement that is the same color but you’ll never be able to match the painted warp color-way. 

Having worked so well for me with painted warps, I do it for all warps now. 

Sent from Liz Moncrief,    www.aweaversway.com

Instagram address:   Moncriefliz 

 



On Aug 27, 2020, at 2:43 PM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:



Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Re: Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

Nann Miller
 

We estimate the length of the remaining warp, cut a warp yarn of that length, thread it from the back of the loom through the heddle and reed and thread it into the web for about an inch.  Then wind the remainder of that yarn onto an empty cone, slide a second empty cone of the same size over the top of the first.  This weights the yarn.  Then, and this is the important part: we take a long shoelace, drape it over the cones so it drags on the floor--thus preventing the untwisting/breaking.  I know it sounds unlikely, but it works--for any yarn I've ever tried, including singles.
Nann Miller


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Elizabeth Moncrief via groups.io <l.moncrief@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 5:53 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks
 
Because I weave a lot of painted warps, I do just what Sara recommends...I wind 2-3 extra warp ends, paint the warp chain, wind it on and then pull those 2-3 ends off of the warp beam in equal measure to hang loose.  That way if you break a thread you have one right there to pick up AND it is in the same color sequence that you’re weaving.  Not doing so leaves you trying to find a replacement that is the same color but you’ll never be able to match the painted warp color-way. 
Having worked so well for me with painted warps, I do it for all warps now. 

Sent from Liz Moncrief,    www.aweaversway.com
Instagram address:   Moncriefliz 


On Aug 27, 2020, at 2:43 PM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:



Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Re: Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

Elizabeth Moncrief
 

Because I weave a lot of painted warps, I do just what Sara recommends...I wind 2-3 extra warp ends, paint the warp chain, wind it on and then pull those 2-3 ends off of the warp beam in equal measure to hang loose.  That way if you break a thread you have one right there to pick up AND it is in the same color sequence that you’re weaving.  Not doing so leaves you trying to find a replacement that is the same color but you’ll never be able to match the painted warp color-way. 
Having worked so well for me with painted warps, I do it for all warps now. 

Sent from Liz Moncrief,    www.aweaversway.com
Instagram address:   Moncriefliz 


On Aug 27, 2020, at 2:43 PM, Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:



Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Re: Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

Sara von Tresckow
 

Professional weavers, at least those in Germany, never repair broken warp threads off the back on a weight. They repair a broken warp by placing a new extension warp as far back on the warp beam with a bow knot with a long tail that belongs to the broken end and enough new yarn to reach the weaving area. This can take some practice. Then the repair end is threaded and sleyed, pinned at the fell line.

When the knot comes close to the weaving area, if there is a long tail, as soon as the tail will reach the fell line plus a few inches, the knot is opened and the tail threaded and sleyed and pinned as before.

Another way to do this is to have a few exrtra warp ends hanging off the warp beam spaced across the warp. In case of a break, the closest is put through the cross at the least sticks and run through heddle and reed to the fell line. The broken warp will now unroll as you weave. When that broken warp end is long enough to reach the fell line, you can break the repair thread and replace it with the original warp – again, pinning at the fell line.

 

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI

sarav@...

Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lorelei Caracausa
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:17 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: [weavetech] Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.

Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?

In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)

Hints, please

 

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Re: Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

Selah Barling
 

Hello Eileen,
My low tech solution when this has happened is to fill a plastic gallon water jug. Hang the replacement thread off the back of the loom. Place the full jug on top. It does require me to get up and release before advancing the warp, but it holds it in place just fine. A weight or small stack of books could serve the same.
Hope this helps,
Selah

On Thursday, August 27, 2020, 02:17:01 PM PDT, Lorelei Caracausa <beeweaverstudio@...> wrote:


A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.
Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?
In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)
Hints, please

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Historical-possibly hysterical weaving tricks

Lorelei Caracausa
 

A question to all of you much more experienced weavers out there.
Historically, cloth was woven using singles.  Has anyone read period diaries or the such, where it was mentioned how the home weaver laid in a repair warp?  Are there any good references relating to this?  Or, for any of you, how have you handled a broken warp?
In my regular weaving , this isn't an issue as I merely hang a new thread off the back with a weight, then bring the original back when appropriate.   This is not an appropriate method with singles as they just un-twist and come apart.(.even with a stiff sizing, after a while)
Hints, please

On Wed, Aug 19, 2020, 7:36 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:


Re: Virtual weaving show and sale

Lynn Baritelle
 

A fascinating and inspiring look at what textile artists are doing in Scotland, particularly. Thanks for the link


Re: Virtual weaving show and sale

Robyn Spady
 

Stunning work!  I was intrigued and impressed with the range of work and how well it was presented.  Plus, I bought a few things.

Thank you for sharing, Eileen.


Re: Virtual weaving show and sale

Mimi Anderson
 

Wow!  What gorgeous work!  Like Amy, I’m still looking, and drooling.  Makes me feel okay again!

Mimi

Mimi Anderson





On Aug 22, 2020, at 6:51 AM, Eileen Driscoll <EFD2@...> wrote:

This Scottish weaving show has some wonderful weavers and weaving.  Well worth a look, and an inspiration for replacing in person shows.



Re: Virtual weaving show and sale

Lala de Dios
 

Thank you Eileen, this is a really atractive marketplace with beautiful textiles. And Dovecot is well worth supporting too. I am sharing the information with other associations.

Kind regards.


Lala de Dios

Indigo Estudio Textil
Ciempozuelos, 3
28359 Titulcia - Madrid
Tel. 91 8010907 - 658 059627
www.indigotextil.com
Skype Lala de Dios
www.indigotextil.com
https://www.facebook.com/lala.dedios.7
https://www.facebook.com/IndigoEstudioTextil?fref=ts


Re: Virtual weaving show and sale

jody Williams
 

Thank you. I will take up the offer and pass this site on to my fiber friends.

Jody in Tucson

On Aug 22, 2020, at 6:51 AM, Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:

This Scottish weaving show has some wonderful weavers and weaving.  Well worth a look, and an inspiration for replacing in person shows.



Re: Virtual weaving show and sale

Amy N
 

I'll second that!  I've just spent the last hour shopping and drooling.  Gorgeous work and beautifully presented!

Amy


On Sat, Aug 22, 2020 at 8:51 AM Eileen Driscoll <efd2@...> wrote:
This Scottish weaving show has some wonderful weavers and weaving.  Well worth a look, and an inspiration for replacing in person shows.


Virtual weaving show and sale

Eileen Driscoll
 

This Scottish weaving show has some wonderful weavers and weaving.  Well worth a look, and an inspiration for replacing in person shows.


Online handwoven textile sale

Eileen Driscoll
 


Multi-weft Double Weave Drafter Version 2

Jane Eisenstein
 
Edited

Version 2 of Multi-weft Double Weave Drafter is now available along with an updated example of how to use it.

Multi-weft Double Weave Drafter is a web based tool that creates dobby WIF drafts for double weaves that use several wefts. Let me know if you have any questions about it.

Best,
Jane Eisenstein


Re: labeling yarn tubes

Susan Lee-Bechtold
 

Me too. It gives me a headache!-the other Su

 

From: weavetech@groups.io [mailto:weavetech@groups.io] On Behalf Of jane@...
Sent: Saturday, August 15, 2020 6:50 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] labeling yarn tubes

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Alaire, I've had trouble reading labels stuck into tubes (not cones) without removing them.

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