Date   

Re: Weaving with cassette tapes

Teresa Ruch
 

I have worked with ribbons that are that weight. Worked fine. Definitely had some tapes go bad and they have an interesting texture. I am going to forward this to a basket maker who might be interested. Any vd tapes for texture differences?
Teresa

On Sat, Aug 8, 2020 at 12:57 PM Linda Davis <tomlin@...> wrote:

I know I have heard or read about people using old cassette tapes for weaving, often  as a recycling challenge. Has anyone had the experience? And if anyone is interested in obtaining a large box of maybe 100 you can have them for free with shipping (not sure how much the box weighs but guessing at least 25 lbs.

 

Linda Davis

Sisters, OR


Weaving with cassette tapes

Linda Davis <tomlin@...>
 

I know I have heard or read about people using old cassette tapes for weaving, often  as a recycling challenge. Has anyone had the experience? And if anyone is interested in obtaining a large box of maybe 100 you can have them for free with shipping (not sure how much the box weighs but guessing at least 25 lbs.

 

Linda Davis

Sisters, OR


Re: What a web site

Joe P
 

Hi Everyone 

"Weaving a Life"

I am so sorry that is just what I get for doing two things at the same time. 

Laura thank you so much for correction. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A.


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Laura Sniderman <lauraknitter@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 6, 2020 7:27 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] What a web site
 
Joe, I think it is "Weaving a Life".
Laura Sniderman
Ada, MI 


On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 3:34 PM Joe P <rugsbyjoe@...> wrote:
Hi Everyone 

A while ago Laura Fry was selling some AVL parts she no longer needed Laura listed the items on her web site. I bought a couple of things. I have been going to Laurs web site just about every day since to see what Laura is up to. I have just been learning things and enjoying. The web site is called (Living a Life) Well worth checking out. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 


Re: What a web site

Laura Sniderman
 

Joe, I think it is "Weaving a Life".
Laura Sniderman
Ada, MI 


On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 3:34 PM Joe P <rugsbyjoe@...> wrote:
Hi Everyone 

A while ago Laura Fry was selling some AVL parts she no longer needed Laura listed the items on her web site. I bought a couple of things. I have been going to Laurs web site just about every day since to see what Laura is up to. I have just been learning things and enjoying. The web site is called (Living a Life) Well worth checking out. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 


Re: What a web site

Claudia Cocco
 

I looked for it - it’s called Weaving a Life. But Weaving is living, right? 😎 Thanks for sharing!!!

On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 12:34 PM Joe P <rugsbyjoe@...> wrote:
Hi Everyone 

A while ago Laura Fry was selling some AVL parts she no longer needed Laura listed the items on her web site. I bought a couple of things. I have been going to Laurs web site just about every day since to see what Laura is up to. I have just been learning things and enjoying. The web site is called (Living a Life) Well worth checking out. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 


What a web site

Joe P
 

Hi Everyone 

A while ago Laura Fry was selling some AVL parts she no longer needed Laura listed the items on her web site. I bought a couple of things. I have been going to Laurs web site just about every day since to see what Laura is up to. I have just been learning things and enjoying. The web site is called (Living a Life) Well worth checking out. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 


Re: AVL CDII Troubleshoot

Alison
 

Mimi,

I recently had a similar issue with my CDIV. Everything was doing what it should and it had worked the day before. For me the issue was that I had to shift the magnet 1/8”. Seriously, 1/8th of an inch. Why it had worked and how it had shifted is a mystery but that was all it took to fix the issue.

Alison


Re: AVL CDII Troubleshoot

Doreen McLaughlin
 

            Since you have a keyspan adapter, you will need to have a special startup procedure. This is because there is a serial connector between the adapter and the CDII, and serial connection ports are only checked ONCE – during startup of the computer.

            So, turn everything off. Then turn on the CDII. After the center box tells you its awaiting the input from the computer

            Turn on the computer. Go get a cold drink while it starts up and recognizes the CDII is talking to it.

            Then open Fiberworks. There should be a place where you go get the comm port. Open that up and ask the computer to look for the comm port from the CDII (it’s madly sending it signals, so it should recognize it). Agree to whatever the computer says the comm port is.

            Click ok.

            Open a draft in Fiberworks and arrange for the draft to be sent to the CDII. You should now be able to treadle the draft.

Doreen


AVL CDII Troubleshoot

Mimi Anderson <mimi_anderson@...>
 

This loom has not been used for about a year.  It powers up, self-test okay, but will not talk to the computer.  Mac, Fiberworks, via keyspan adapter.  Worked before, but solenoids will not engage.  Suggestions?
Thanks,

Mimi

Mimi Anderson






Re: Woven sensors

Sally O
 

For those interested in this topic, watch for your next issue of Shuttle Spindle & Dyepot, which contains an article about projects undertaken by Professor Laura Devendorf and her team at the Unstable Design Lab at U of Colorado - Boulder.


Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Virginia Glenn
 

I always throw in a Color Catcher sheet if I’m afraid that something might bleed. I don’t know how that might affect the alkalinity of the water but it gathers up any wandering color.
Virginia Glenn


Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Ian Bowers
 

Does this help:

https://www.georgeweil.com/250ml-fibrecrafts-fixitol-p 

Ian Bowers (Dr)
Managing Director 
George Weil &Sons Ltd 

On 2 Aug 2020, at 18:54, Teresa Ruch via groups.io <teresaruch@...> wrote:


There may be a "blush" in the water when the ph value of the water is different from the dyer's water. It is usually the first time only.
As a dyer I rinse and soak my yarns until the water is clear. If the buyer water is hard you will get a new discharge until it adjusts to the new ph. If you put detergents with brightners (bleach) then you will get a color shed. If you add vinegar to a veggies fiber rinse it will change the ph and you might get more color in the water. 
Teresa Ruch

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 10:39 AM Nann Miller <ngmille@...> wrote:
I understand the dye/water/non-reattaching relationship with Synthropol.  What is Retayne and how does it work to stop the dye migration?
Nann Miller

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Ian Bowers via groups.io <md=georgeweil.co.uk@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 1:08 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Washing handwoven textiles
 
Synthrapol will shift out the unattached dye, but it won’t fix it to the fabric. 

Ian Bowers (Dr)
Managing Director 
George Weil &Sons Ltd 

On 2 Aug 2020, at 16:45, Mandi Ballard via groups.io <mandi.ballard=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:


Nothing is going to "fix" a dye that wasn't properly applied or rinsed out. If it's a wool or silk yarn, washing in too warm of water may continue to cause bleeding. If it's cellulose the only thing you can do (and what should've been done at the end of the dye process) is rinsing until the water runs clear. Synthrapol helps prevent backstaining, which means it will help keep white or light colored areas from picking up loose dye.

  ---Mandi

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 10:23 AM Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:
Synthrapol (or the Dharma substitute) keep dye molecules in suspension until
the rinsing is complete so that they do not redeposit themselves on the
fabric.
Synthrapol does not fix the dye.
I am not really familiar with all the things out there, but there are other
products that claim to "fix" dyes so they stop bleeding - however, any
product is probably specific to the dye used in your yarn.
I would study the Dharma web site carefully and see if there is something to
help you.
www.dharmatrading.com



Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs






Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Teresa Ruch
 

There may be a "blush" in the water when the ph value of the water is different from the dyer's water. It is usually the first time only.
As a dyer I rinse and soak my yarns until the water is clear. If the buyer water is hard you will get a new discharge until it adjusts to the new ph. If you put detergents with brightners (bleach) then you will get a color shed. If you add vinegar to a veggies fiber rinse it will change the ph and you might get more color in the water. 
Teresa Ruch

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 10:39 AM Nann Miller <ngmille@...> wrote:
I understand the dye/water/non-reattaching relationship with Synthropol.  What is Retayne and how does it work to stop the dye migration?
Nann Miller

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Ian Bowers via groups.io <md=georgeweil.co.uk@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 1:08 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Washing handwoven textiles
 
Synthrapol will shift out the unattached dye, but it won’t fix it to the fabric. 

Ian Bowers (Dr)
Managing Director 
George Weil &Sons Ltd 

On 2 Aug 2020, at 16:45, Mandi Ballard via groups.io <mandi.ballard=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:


Nothing is going to "fix" a dye that wasn't properly applied or rinsed out. If it's a wool or silk yarn, washing in too warm of water may continue to cause bleeding. If it's cellulose the only thing you can do (and what should've been done at the end of the dye process) is rinsing until the water runs clear. Synthrapol helps prevent backstaining, which means it will help keep white or light colored areas from picking up loose dye.

  ---Mandi

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 10:23 AM Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:
Synthrapol (or the Dharma substitute) keep dye molecules in suspension until
the rinsing is complete so that they do not redeposit themselves on the
fabric.
Synthrapol does not fix the dye.
I am not really familiar with all the things out there, but there are other
products that claim to "fix" dyes so they stop bleeding - however, any
product is probably specific to the dye used in your yarn.
I would study the Dharma web site carefully and see if there is something to
help you.
www.dharmatrading.com



Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs






Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Nann Miller
 

I understand the dye/water/non-reattaching relationship with Synthropol.  What is Retayne and how does it work to stop the dye migration?
Nann Miller


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Ian Bowers via groups.io <md@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 1:08 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Washing handwoven textiles
 
Synthrapol will shift out the unattached dye, but it won’t fix it to the fabric. 

Ian Bowers (Dr)
Managing Director 
George Weil &Sons Ltd 

On 2 Aug 2020, at 16:45, Mandi Ballard via groups.io <mandi.ballard@...> wrote:


Nothing is going to "fix" a dye that wasn't properly applied or rinsed out. If it's a wool or silk yarn, washing in too warm of water may continue to cause bleeding. If it's cellulose the only thing you can do (and what should've been done at the end of the dye process) is rinsing until the water runs clear. Synthrapol helps prevent backstaining, which means it will help keep white or light colored areas from picking up loose dye.

  ---Mandi

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 10:23 AM Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:
Synthrapol (or the Dharma substitute) keep dye molecules in suspension until
the rinsing is complete so that they do not redeposit themselves on the
fabric.
Synthrapol does not fix the dye.
I am not really familiar with all the things out there, but there are other
products that claim to "fix" dyes so they stop bleeding - however, any
product is probably specific to the dye used in your yarn.
I would study the Dharma web site carefully and see if there is something to
help you.
www.dharmatrading.com



Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs






Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Ian Bowers
 

Synthrapol will shift out the unattached dye, but it won’t fix it to the fabric. 

Ian Bowers (Dr)
Managing Director 
George Weil &Sons Ltd 

On 2 Aug 2020, at 16:45, Mandi Ballard via groups.io <mandi.ballard@...> wrote:


Nothing is going to "fix" a dye that wasn't properly applied or rinsed out. If it's a wool or silk yarn, washing in too warm of water may continue to cause bleeding. If it's cellulose the only thing you can do (and what should've been done at the end of the dye process) is rinsing until the water runs clear. Synthrapol helps prevent backstaining, which means it will help keep white or light colored areas from picking up loose dye.

  ---Mandi

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 10:23 AM Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:
Synthrapol (or the Dharma substitute) keep dye molecules in suspension until
the rinsing is complete so that they do not redeposit themselves on the
fabric.
Synthrapol does not fix the dye.
I am not really familiar with all the things out there, but there are other
products that claim to "fix" dyes so they stop bleeding - however, any
product is probably specific to the dye used in your yarn.
I would study the Dharma web site carefully and see if there is something to
help you.
www.dharmatrading.com



Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs






Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Subu
 

Agree that dye that was not applied and fixed properly will never be fixed…..all you can do is rinse and rinse.  BUT – if using this yarn I would always include a Shout Color Catcher in the wash process.  The pH of the sheet attracts all the fugitive dye in the water and does not allow it to stain the cloth.  It will protect your item from the bleeding.   I would not use Synthrapol for my everyday washing….regular detergent is fine for that.  But Synthrapol works great for scouring and washing after dyeing.  It can be a skin irritant, so I would refrain from using it for regular laundry.

 

Su Butler J


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Sara von Tresckow
 

I agree that you can't entirely fix a bleeding dye job, but I HAVE on
occasion used fixative after the fact on some fugitive dye and found it to
stabilize the bleeding to an acceptable level. Dharma has a whole list of
"fixatives", some of which can be used after the fact to at least improve
the situation.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Louise Yale
 

In my experience, there is an end point to bleeding of some colors on
yarns and fabric...you just have to forge on.

I do soaks in a Synthrapol solution for 30-60 minutes, rinse several times
and re-do the process - over and over again until the water is clear.
This may take all day plus.

Alternative, if the product is NOT being sold commercially, just live with
it.

I would not sell an item with color bleeding.

Thank you to everyone who has added their expertise to answer this
question. I was especially interested in the 'low suds' Synthapol product
which could be used in front loading machines.

In my experience, the longer soaks make the difference.

My front loading washing machine does not have a "soak" feature and I do
not think it would be effective with bleeding colors because there is not
enough water. This is a 'water saver' machine.

When this machine goes the-way-of-all-things, I will replace it with a top
loader with a 'soak' cycle.

Louise in NorCal
PS I once bought a gorgeous long cotton nightgown in my favorite deep
indigo blue color - on sale! such a deal!! - and wore it to bed. From the
neck down, I turned indigo blue. The color took about 48 hours to fade...I
had to wear long sleeves, a high necked top and dark hose to work.

Thank you for this topic. Another question. Is Synthrapol the best
thing to wash with for yarn that bleads excessively, so is there something
better? I have some yarn I love, but boy does it bleed. To use it I've
been winding the warp, adding a lot of loose choke ties, and soaking and
changing the water - over and over. There has to be an easier way.

-Sally


Visit me at: sallyeyring.com




Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Mandi Ballard
 

Nothing is going to "fix" a dye that wasn't properly applied or rinsed out. If it's a wool or silk yarn, washing in too warm of water may continue to cause bleeding. If it's cellulose the only thing you can do (and what should've been done at the end of the dye process) is rinsing until the water runs clear. Synthrapol helps prevent backstaining, which means it will help keep white or light colored areas from picking up loose dye.

  ---Mandi

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 10:23 AM Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...> wrote:
Synthrapol (or the Dharma substitute) keep dye molecules in suspension until
the rinsing is complete so that they do not redeposit themselves on the
fabric.
Synthrapol does not fix the dye.
I am not really familiar with all the things out there, but there are other
products that claim to "fix" dyes so they stop bleeding - however, any
product is probably specific to the dye used in your yarn.
I would study the Dharma web site carefully and see if there is something to
help you.
www.dharmatrading.com



Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs






Re: Washing handwoven textiles

Sara von Tresckow
 

Synthrapol (or the Dharma substitute) keep dye molecules in suspension until
the rinsing is complete so that they do not redeposit themselves on the
fabric.
Synthrapol does not fix the dye.
I am not really familiar with all the things out there, but there are other
products that claim to "fix" dyes so they stop bleeding - however, any
product is probably specific to the dye used in your yarn.
I would study the Dharma web site carefully and see if there is something to
help you.
www.dharmatrading.com



Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs

1981 - 2000 of 62187