Date   

nancy asks

nancy
 

good persons out there,

i have dyed a lot of wool, fleece or roving or yarn, but.... i have never dyed cotton whether yarns or roving.  now, like rest of you, i am couped up and bored and, on point.... i have big box of cotton roving.  can i dye cotton roving???  i am not youtube facile but i tried looking there and did not find anything about cotton

/s/ nancy biggins in caution locked down california


Re: Treadle and Harness Hooks

Elizabeth Moncrief
 

Try McMaster Carr Hardware online. 😊

Sent from liz's iPhone
Www.aweaversway.com
Instagram:    Moncriefliz






On Mar 20, 2020, at 2:33 PM, Pat Bullen <spinningwitch24@...> wrote:

My husband's father built a lovely loom about 55 years ago.  My husband, Larry, an engineer, modified it 15 years later making new pulleys and hooks.  Fast forward to 1984 when we got married and I started using the loom and started having trouble with the harnesses jumping their pulleys.  Fast forward to our move to WI in the fall of 2018.  Larry recently remade the pulleys and discovered some of the hooks he made to attach the harnesses, lams, and treadles are missing.  We are looking for a source for new hooks.  Harrisville has nice heavy duty lanyard hooks on the end of their treadle chains at $6.50 each.  We just want the hooks or something comparable.  Any suggestions?  We need at least 32 hooks. 
Thanks,
Pat and Larry Bullen

"Knitters, Crocheters, Weavers, Quilters, Spinners...
Do not fear self quarantine...
This is what we have been training for"


Treadle and Harness Hooks

Pat Bullen
 

My husband's father built a lovely loom about 55 years ago.  My husband, Larry, an engineer, modified it 15 years later making new pulleys and hooks.  Fast forward to 1984 when we got married and I started using the loom and started having trouble with the harnesses jumping their pulleys.  Fast forward to our move to WI in the fall of 2018.  Larry recently remade the pulleys and discovered some of the hooks he made to attach the harnesses, lams, and treadles are missing.  We are looking for a source for new hooks.  Harrisville has nice heavy duty lanyard hooks on the end of their treadle chains at $6.50 each.  We just want the hooks or something comparable.  Any suggestions?  We need at least 32 hooks. 
Thanks,
Pat and Larry Bullen

"Knitters, Crocheters, Weavers, Quilters, Spinners...
Do not fear self quarantine...
This is what we have been training for"


Re: Sources of inspiration

Jayne F
 

We’ve used email “Show & Tell” many times when meetings have been cancelled due to snow! Plain email works well for small guilds <20.

This time there is a lot more advanced notice so there should be a lot more to share!

Jayne in Maine

 


Re: Sources of inspiration

Joe P
 

Hi Everyone and Eileen 

Eileen I enjoyed what you wrote in your post a great deal (We can tackle the weaving projects we have dreamed about). That is just what I have been doing. I have been reading my weaving books I have not read. I have been e-mailing my friends off list. With everything else I have to do in a day. My day is gone before I got it started and I know I am not alone. Because I have many weaving dreams I want to try that I have read about other weavers on this list doing. Call it inspiration. 

I am happy today. My touch screen lap top got here it was back ordered it is at my accountants office. Dan called to tell me he would be dropping it off later this afternoon. I said, I am sure you have a lot going on doing peoples taxes. It is ok with me if you drop it off one day at the end of next week. I am working on a project right now anyways. Dan said ok call me. 

I have a stash I am going to go dig out a roll of natural fabric I have about 35 pounds of it and the hand crank cutter. I feel like weaving a few place mats. The warp is going to be all kinds of colors that I have of end cones and some natural. I am not sure yet what the pattern is going to be yet. But I will come up with something nice. I am going to set the warp at 15 so the pattern shows up nice and strong. Play music in the back round and work on weaving to my hearts content. I am gong to pick a threading that I can make a lot of different types of place mats by just changing the side tie up on the AVL loom. Boy I sure like that feature. Just sit on a stool and change the tie up. I have found I have been doing a lot more pattern weaving.

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A.  
      


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Sally O <s.orgren@...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 17, 2020 12:24 PM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Sources of inspiration
 
I, too, am enjoying samples arriving from the Cross Country Weaver's 2020 color challenge, "The 3 B's: Birds, Butterflies, & Bugs." (Those of you who are on the mailing list for the traveling notebooks will be in for a treat this coming year!)

My guilds have all cancelled for April, so one of the suggestions we are considering is a virtual "show n tell." Our guild challenge for the year was "Something New" and the presentation was scheduled for next month. The idea is that the participants would send in a photo of their item and write up their tell, and then submit the email to our newsletter person under the subject, "Something New." Each day in April, our newsletter person would use the membership distribution list to share one item, to help the days pass more quickly. When we gather again, we will have a table laid out for all the challenge items. 

For those of you who haven't thought of this yet, now is the time to be sure you are carrying your own pen if you have to visit a doctor's office, bank, or other place where you may need to sign documents. Also, I am carrying a stylus so I don't have to touch any screens to complete transactions.


Re: Sources of inspiration

Sally O
 

I, too, am enjoying samples arriving from the Cross Country Weaver's 2020 color challenge, "The 3 B's: Birds, Butterflies, & Bugs." (Those of you who are on the mailing list for the traveling notebooks will be in for a treat this coming year!)

My guilds have all cancelled for April, so one of the suggestions we are considering is a virtual "show n tell." Our guild challenge for the year was "Something New" and the presentation was scheduled for next month. The idea is that the participants would send in a photo of their item and write up their tell, and then submit the email to our newsletter person under the subject, "Something New." Each day in April, our newsletter person would use the membership distribution list to share one item, to help the days pass more quickly. When we gather again, we will have a table laid out for all the challenge items. 

For those of you who haven't thought of this yet, now is the time to be sure you are carrying your own pen if you have to visit a doctor's office, bank, or other place where you may need to sign documents. Also, I am carrying a stylus so I don't have to touch any screens to complete transactions.


Sources of inspiration

Eileen Driscoll
 

I have been enjoying my woven samples from the Complex Weavers 24 + or - group. I notice two things

One, so many weaving teachers and resources used. I thank each one for all they have given to us as teachers.
Olsener
Jannie Taylor
Bonnie Inoyue
Marion Stubenitsky
Marg Coe
And many references to Handweaving.net.

And two, a new book from Marion Stubenitsky that I was completely unaware of, Double with a Twist, about deflected weaves.

Now that we are all on sabbatical from real life, we can tackle the weaving projects we have dreamed of.

Hoping that you are all keeping healthy and safe.

Eileen
Ithaca NY


Martha Stanley

Russell Fickett
 

I took a wonderful class in the 80’s at the Brookfield craft Center, Brookfield Ct.  on Rugs with Martha. She autographed a 1984 copy of  “A rug Weavers Sourcebook. “    Cheri Fickett


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad


Re: Dyeing cons

Ian Bowers
 

I understand your point, but what is the alternative?  Also this water is being returned to the water cycle for evaporation-rain-drink.

 

Best regards

 

Ian Bowers (Dr)

Managing Director

 

www.georgeweil.com

GEORGE WEIL & SONS LTD, Old Portsmouth Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 1LZ

tel: 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax: 0 (+44) 1483 565807

George Weil & Sons is a limited company registered in England and Wales.
Registered number 00321890. Registered office: Peasmarsh, Guildford, GU3 1LZ 

Follow George Weil: visit Twitter.comvisit Facebook.comsee our Blog
__________________________________________________________

If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender and delete the message

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of margcoe via Groups.Io
Sent: 16 March 2020 02:24
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

 

The topic has become focused on chemical contamination. But what about wasting a precious resource? That is water.

 

Perfectly good drinking water is being used to dye, at a local level. Commercially millions of gallons are used for dyeing. It’s such a serious issue, that scientists are developing / have developed “waterless” dyes.

 

Because something has worked for 50 or 100 years, doesn’t necessarily mean it’s going to work much longer.

 

Marg

Sent from iDevice

coeweaves.com

e-weave-online.thinkific.com


Re: Dyeing cons

Ian Bowers
 

The comment to avoid pouring near livestock is to avoid their eating the grass when the exhausted dye liquor is still present on the leaves. 

 

Just doing an ‘order of magnitude’ calculation; assume the liquor is 25 litres (say 6 US gallons), the volume is 25,000cc  (I am working in metric, it is so much easier!!!), and a cubic metre or 1,000,000 cc (or to a rough approximation 1 cu yd) of soil weighs about 1 ton the dilution in this is 1:400 which is already pretty dilute. I don’t think I have got a zero wrong, but do check!  Further spreading driven by rain, is going to make it even weaker, hence the guidance.

 

Best regards

 

Ian Bowers (Dr)

Managing Director

 

www.georgeweil.com

GEORGE WEIL & SONS LTD, Old Portsmouth Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 1LZ

tel: 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax: 0 (+44) 1483 565807

George Weil & Sons is a limited company registered in England and Wales.
Registered number 00321890. Registered office: Peasmarsh, Guildford, GU3 1LZ 

Follow George Weil: visit Twitter.comvisit Facebook.comsee our Blog
__________________________________________________________

If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender and delete the message

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Joe P via Groups.Io
Sent: 15 March 2020 18:56
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

 

Hi Everyone and Ian 

 

I enjoy to weave a great deal and I weave a lot, and as I enjoy to weave there are people that like to dye fiber just as much. I have been a weaver for just under 50 years so lets say a person that like to dye fibers has also been dyeing fibers for as long as I have been a weaver, 50 years. In the last paragraph of your post you wrote (If the local system is a septic tank it may be slightly preferable to dispose by diluting and pouring onto a piece of rough land away from live stock) To me I could be wrong, I do not dye fibers, If the old dye bath is diluted and pored on rough land away from live stock. How about people. How long do you think it will take to get to the ground water? Keeping in mind we are not all hobby weavers and dyers. I am sure yes there are dyes to use that are safe. But I am also sure some dyes are not. We all know at times safety will go right out the window for a gain in profit. 

 

Keep Weaving 

Joe Bear in WI U.S.A

 

 

 

 

 

    


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Ian Bowers <md@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 2:54 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

 

Joe

 

First, lead is a well-known and well understood cumulative poison.  Over time it builds up in the body to the point where it is causing damage and can be fatal.  Most developed countries removed lead pipes from the water delivery systems long ago, and also removed lead compounds from petrol decades ago since it was getting into the food chain after leaving the car exhaust.  If the water system has a high load of chlorine or the lime in the water is soft (calcium carbonate) it will, over time react with and dissolve the lead in small, but important quantities and end up in your food and drinking water.  You can see that it is important to public health to remove the lead pipes and replace them with plastic pipes.

 

Contamination of water supply always needs managing.  However in most urban areas the sewage system is designed to cope with industrial accidents and discharges into the system.  On that basis the discharge from a craft dyer is small compared with the amount of detergents and cleaning compounds used daily by households and arriving at the sewage farm.  Dyes, themselves are low risk chemicals, and this is confirmed by the fact that many (in particular the acid dye family) are used as food colourants, and alum, a mordant, is a pickling agent for food. 

 

On that basis, dyes can safely be disposed of into the town drains, or if the local system is a septic tank it may be slightly preferable to dispose by diluting and pouring onto a piece of rough land away from livestock. 

 

Best regards

 

Ian Bowers (Dr)

Managing Director

 

www.georgeweil.com

GEORGE WEIL & SONS LTD, Old Portsmouth Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 1LZ

tel: 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax: 0 (+44) 1483 565807

George Weil & Sons is a limited company registered in England and Wales.
Registered number 00321890. Registered office: Peasmarsh, Guildford, GU3 1LZ 

Follow George Weil: visit Twitter.comvisit Facebook.comsee our Blog
__________________________________________________________

If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender and delete the message

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Joe P via Groups.Io
Sent: 15 March 2020 07:07
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

 

Hi Everyone 

 

Michigan changed the chemicals they used in the water treatment plant. In doing so the new chemicals and in the older homes the led pipe had some kind of reaction. I do not remember all of it this was some time ago. 

 

I live in in Milwaukee Wisconsin Not that far from Michigan. Because of the problem Michigan had with the chemicals used in the water treatment plants Milwaukee did a lot of testing of the treated water it was not great above mid range. of safety. The city leaders gave out testing kits and also water filters to people for free. It was decided to start to remove all of the led pipe out of schools and day cares and homes. This is not going to happen over night it is going to take a lot of years. More years then I will be alive at the age I am of 65.

 

I am going to do the best I can to explain what takes place.

 

The area around the water meter in my basement has to be cleared. about 1/4th of the basement. That means all of the looms and cutting tables and industrial sewing machines and bins of yarn and fabric have to be moved. Every thing has to be piled up to make room. 

 

The basement floor has to have a trench cut in it about a foot wide and 6 feel long for the torpedo digger. this digger works of of compressed air. and digs form the basement to the curb water shut off to the home. 1 side walk slab is taken out and a digger digs down to the shut off at the curb. Then from the curb to the water main in the center of the street is dug up to where the water pipe from the home is joined. Then the torpedo digger is started and digs under ground from the basement to the curb water shut off pulling a new copper pipe. Then the torpedo digs under ground to the water main in the center of the street. All of the fitting are new with copper. Every thing is closed and the floor in the basement is re cemented. A new side walk slab is poured later date 

 

Now if the home owner has any led pipe running under the floor it is removed  and the old led pipe is cut off and capped This is a cost on top of removing the led pipe to the home from the water main to the water meter. The cost enough.  

 

In all of the reading I have done no where I have read about shoe waterproofing agents. 

 

The homes can be hooked up to city water in Michigan when the home owner have all of the led pipe removed form the home.  

 

I would like to know what weavers are doing with the left over dye baths, and in dyeing fibers in washing machines are you disposing of this waste water in a safe way?  Just how are you doing this? 

 

Keep Weaving 

Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 

 

 

 

 

 


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@...>
Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2020 11:18 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

 

The area of Michigan just north of where I live has a severe and
widespread problem with ground and well water contamination from
treating shoe leather with waterproofing agents.  Children have been
found with thousands of ppm resident in their blood.  Houses that are
not able to connect to a city water system have industrial water
treatment systems. The world is full of examples where  contaminants
have been released, either from ignorance, or because it's the
cheapest thing to do.  But to highlight dyeing seems to me to be short
sighted.  I also take some issues with the phrase "dangerous
chemicals" without naming these.  Anything  from petrochemicals is
ideally to be avoided, given that this is a non-renewable resource.
But salt is a toxic chemical.  Vinegar is acid. Even water can be
toxic.  I am also somewhat confused, because I have made indigo vats
with natural and synthetic indigo, and the process of creating the
vat, the chemicals used, are identical.
The main reason that the rural area I live in has been spared the
contamination problems that many areas of MIchigan see (being a state
that saw early settlement and industrialization), is that the railroad
bypassed this area, and there are no rivers navigable by large boats.
This made the early residents unhappy, but we are now quite happy.
Sandra


Re: Dyeing cons

Ian Bowers
 

The pH of the water supply depends greatly on the source, and this can change from day to day, to balance usage of the reservoirs. I have seen pH change from 6.0 to 9.5 in a day.

It certainly had to be monitored and balanced when dyeing with acid or fibre reactive dyes which do depend on the correct pH of the dye solution.

Best regards
 
Ian Bowers (Dr)
Managing Director
 
www.georgeweil.com
GEORGE WEIL & SONS LTD, Old Portsmouth Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 1LZ
tel: 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax: 0 (+44) 1483 565807

George Weil & Sons is a limited company registered in England and Wales.
Registered number 00321890. Registered office: Peasmarsh, Guildford, GU3 1LZ 
Follow George Weil:
__________________________________________________________

If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender and delete the message

-----Original Message-----
From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Sara von Tresckow via Groups.Io
Sent: 15 March 2020 17:41
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

Because one never knows the PH of city water which is treated with things to make it safe, it is better not to keep on using the old fashioned lead pipe.
Fond du Lac has a similar replacement policy for older homes.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of "When a Single Harness Simply Isn't Enough"
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs


Re: Dyeing cons

margcoe
 

The topic has become focused on chemical contamination. But what about wasting a precious resource? That is water.

Perfectly good drinking water is being used to dye, at a local level. Commercially millions of gallons are used for dyeing. It’s such a serious issue, that scientists are developing / have developed “waterless” dyes.

Because something has worked for 50 or 100 years, doesn’t necessarily mean it’s going to work much longer.

Marg

Sent from iDevice
coeweaves.com
e-weave-online.thinkific.com


Re: Dyeing cons

Susan Lee-Bechtold
 

Since we built our house 12 years ago, we just put in two lines to the drain in the garage sink, one goes to a small rock lined, with plastic under, pond in the side yard, so the effluent can either go to the drain, or when the drain is closed off and the other line opened, to the pool to evaporate.-the other Su in Santa Fe

From: weavetech@groups.io [mailto:weavetech@groups.io] On Behalf Of Joe P
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 1:07 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

 

Hi Everyone 

 

Michigan changed the chemicals they used in the water treatment plant. In doing so the new chemicals and in the older homes the led pipe had some kind of reaction. I do not remember all of it this was some time ago. 

 

I live in in Milwaukee Wisconsin Not that far from Michigan. Because of the problem Michigan had with the chemicals used in the water treatment plants Milwaukee did a lot of testing of the treated water it was not great above mid range. of safety. The city leaders gave out testing kits and also water filters to people for free. It was decided to start to remove all of the led pipe out of schools and day cares and homes. This is not going to happen over night it is going to take a lot of years. More years then I will be alive at the age I am of 65.

 

I am going to do the best I can to explain what takes place.

 

The area around the water meter in my basement has to be cleared. about 1/4th of the basement. That means all of the looms and cutting tables and industrial sewing machines and bins of yarn and fabric have to be moved. Every thing has to be piled up to make room. 

 

The basement floor has to have a trench cut in it about a foot wide and 6 feel long for the torpedo digger. this digger works of of compressed air. and digs form the basement to the curb water shut off to the home. 1 side walk slab is taken out and a digger digs down to the shut off at the curb. Then from the curb to the water main in the center of the street is dug up to where the water pipe from the home is joined. Then the torpedo digger is started and digs under ground from the basement to the curb water shut off pulling a new copper pipe. Then the torpedo digs under ground to the water main in the center of the street. All of the fitting are new with copper. Every thing is closed and the floor in the basement is re cemented. A new side walk slab is poured later date 

 

Now if the home owner has any led pipe running under the floor it is removed  and the old led pipe is cut off and capped This is a cost on top of removing the led pipe to the home from the water main to the water meter. The cost enough.  

 

In all of the reading I have done no where I have read about shoe waterproofing agents. 

 

The homes can be hooked up to city water in Michigan when the home owner have all of the led pipe removed form the home.  

 

I would like to know what weavers are doing with the left over dye baths, and in dyeing fibers in washing machines are you disposing of this waste water in a safe way?  Just how are you doing this? 

 

Keep Weaving 

Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 

 

 

 

 

 


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@...>
Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2020 11:18 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

 

The area of Michigan just north of where I live has a severe and
widespread problem with ground and well water contamination from
treating shoe leather with waterproofing agents.  Children have been
found with thousands of ppm resident in their blood.  Houses that are
not able to connect to a city water system have industrial water
treatment systems. The world is full of examples where  contaminants
have been released, either from ignorance, or because it's the
cheapest thing to do.  But to highlight dyeing seems to me to be short
sighted.  I also take some issues with the phrase "dangerous
chemicals" without naming these.  Anything  from petrochemicals is
ideally to be avoided, given that this is a non-renewable resource.
But salt is a toxic chemical.  Vinegar is acid. Even water can be
toxic.  I am also somewhat confused, because I have made indigo vats
with natural and synthetic indigo, and the process of creating the
vat, the chemicals used, are identical.
The main reason that the rural area I live in has been spared the
contamination problems that many areas of MIchigan see (being a state
that saw early settlement and industrialization), is that the railroad
bypassed this area, and there are no rivers navigable by large boats.
This made the early residents unhappy, but we are now quite happy.
Sandra



Re: Dyeing cons

Joe P
 

Hi Everyone and Ian 

I enjoy to weave a great deal and I weave a lot, and as I enjoy to weave there are people that like to dye fiber just as much. I have been a weaver for just under 50 years so lets say a person that like to dye fibers has also been dyeing fibers for as long as I have been a weaver, 50 years. In the last paragraph of your post you wrote (If the local system is a septic tank it may be slightly preferable to dispose by diluting and pouring onto a piece of rough land away from live stock) To me I could be wrong, I do not dye fibers, If the old dye bath is diluted and pored on rough land away from live stock. How about people. How long do you think it will take to get to the ground water? Keeping in mind we are not all hobby weavers and dyers. I am sure yes there are dyes to use that are safe. But I am also sure some dyes are not. We all know at times safety will go right out the window for a gain in profit. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A





    


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of Ian Bowers <md@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 2:54 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons
 

Joe

 

First, lead is a well-known and well understood cumulative poison.  Over time it builds up in the body to the point where it is causing damage and can be fatal.  Most developed countries removed lead pipes from the water delivery systems long ago, and also removed lead compounds from petrol decades ago since it was getting into the food chain after leaving the car exhaust.  If the water system has a high load of chlorine or the lime in the water is soft (calcium carbonate) it will, over time react with and dissolve the lead in small, but important quantities and end up in your food and drinking water.  You can see that it is important to public health to remove the lead pipes and replace them with plastic pipes.

 

Contamination of water supply always needs managing.  However in most urban areas the sewage system is designed to cope with industrial accidents and discharges into the system.  On that basis the discharge from a craft dyer is small compared with the amount of detergents and cleaning compounds used daily by households and arriving at the sewage farm.  Dyes, themselves are low risk chemicals, and this is confirmed by the fact that many (in particular the acid dye family) are used as food colourants, and alum, a mordant, is a pickling agent for food. 

 

On that basis, dyes can safely be disposed of into the town drains, or if the local system is a septic tank it may be slightly preferable to dispose by diluting and pouring onto a piece of rough land away from livestock. 

 

Best regards

 

Ian Bowers (Dr)

Managing Director

 

www.georgeweil.com

GEORGE WEIL & SONS LTD, Old Portsmouth Road, Peasmarsh, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 1LZ

tel: 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax: 0 (+44) 1483 565807

George Weil & Sons is a limited company registered in England and Wales.
Registered number 00321890. Registered office: Peasmarsh, Guildford, GU3 1LZ 

Follow George Weil: visit Twitter.comvisit Facebook.comsee our Blog
__________________________________________________________

If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender and delete the message

 

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> On Behalf Of Joe P via Groups.Io
Sent: 15 March 2020 07:07
To: weavetech@groups.io
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

 

Hi Everyone 

 

Michigan changed the chemicals they used in the water treatment plant. In doing so the new chemicals and in the older homes the led pipe had some kind of reaction. I do not remember all of it this was some time ago. 

 

I live in in Milwaukee Wisconsin Not that far from Michigan. Because of the problem Michigan had with the chemicals used in the water treatment plants Milwaukee did a lot of testing of the treated water it was not great above mid range. of safety. The city leaders gave out testing kits and also water filters to people for free. It was decided to start to remove all of the led pipe out of schools and day cares and homes. This is not going to happen over night it is going to take a lot of years. More years then I will be alive at the age I am of 65.

 

I am going to do the best I can to explain what takes place.

 

The area around the water meter in my basement has to be cleared. about 1/4th of the basement. That means all of the looms and cutting tables and industrial sewing machines and bins of yarn and fabric have to be moved. Every thing has to be piled up to make room. 

 

The basement floor has to have a trench cut in it about a foot wide and 6 feel long for the torpedo digger. this digger works of of compressed air. and digs form the basement to the curb water shut off to the home. 1 side walk slab is taken out and a digger digs down to the shut off at the curb. Then from the curb to the water main in the center of the street is dug up to where the water pipe from the home is joined. Then the torpedo digger is started and digs under ground from the basement to the curb water shut off pulling a new copper pipe. Then the torpedo digs under ground to the water main in the center of the street. All of the fitting are new with copper. Every thing is closed and the floor in the basement is re cemented. A new side walk slab is poured later date 

 

Now if the home owner has any led pipe running under the floor it is removed  and the old led pipe is cut off and capped This is a cost on top of removing the led pipe to the home from the water main to the water meter. The cost enough.  

 

In all of the reading I have done no where I have read about shoe waterproofing agents. 

 

The homes can be hooked up to city water in Michigan when the home owner have all of the led pipe removed form the home.  

 

I would like to know what weavers are doing with the left over dye baths, and in dyeing fibers in washing machines are you disposing of this waste water in a safe way?  Just how are you doing this? 

 

Keep Weaving 

Joe Bear in WI U.S.A. 

 

 

 

 

 


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@...>
Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2020 11:18 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons

 

The area of Michigan just north of where I live has a severe and
widespread problem with ground and well water contamination from
treating shoe leather with waterproofing agents.  Children have been
found with thousands of ppm resident in their blood.  Houses that are
not able to connect to a city water system have industrial water
treatment systems. The world is full of examples where  contaminants
have been released, either from ignorance, or because it's the
cheapest thing to do.  But to highlight dyeing seems to me to be short
sighted.  I also take some issues with the phrase "dangerous
chemicals" without naming these.  Anything  from petrochemicals is
ideally to be avoided, given that this is a non-renewable resource.
But salt is a toxic chemical.  Vinegar is acid. Even water can be
toxic.  I am also somewhat confused, because I have made indigo vats
with natural and synthetic indigo, and the process of creating the
vat, the chemicals used, are identical.
The main reason that the rural area I live in has been spared the
contamination problems that many areas of MIchigan see (being a state
that saw early settlement and industrialization), is that the railroad
bypassed this area, and there are no rivers navigable by large boats.
This made the early residents unhappy, but we are now quite happy.
Sandra



Re: Dyeing cons

Margaret Welch
 

Dear Joe,  
I’m retired from a regional water supplier in New york State after 45 years, so I’m a bit more informed.
1. No level of lead is safe, but there are “allowable”. quantities by law.  Everyone wants to get the levels in your water down as low as practicable. Mineral deposits and flushing the lines thoroughly every morning before first draw reduce lead in the water, but you are still getting some lead
2.  Water suppliers are required to determine if there are lead service lines, even if they are customer owned, to test to see how much lead is being absorbed from those pipes under worst conditions, and if the level using formulas that determine how many tests have to be done etc the level is over the allowable, the supplier has to run an aggressive lead service replacement program.  Water suppliers can go with the replacement policy anyways to save the headaches.  Allowable levels only go down so replacing can make sense. It’s the responsible thing to do. And it saves money to do all of them earlier than to do piecemeal replacements later.  A stitch in time saves nine.
3.  I don’t have any plans to move and I’m guessing you don’t either.  But, if you do sell the house, you will have to replace the line to satisfy any bank/mortgage holder.

Be glad they are doing it for you and they will have had lots of recent practice in replacing lines with minimum disruption.

Tip:  Draw a couple of buckets of water and leave them in the bathroom to flush toilets or wash hands.  Your water will be off for a while.

Feel free to contact me. I keep a pretty close eye on email.  

Meg Welch. megwelch@...


On Mar 15, 2020, at 1:33 PM, Joe P <rugsbyjoe@...> wrote:


Hi Everyone 

If what I am reading is true. That led pipe is safe as long as the calcified lining stays in place. Then why would a city the size of Milwaukee be removing all of the led pipe? It is just not safe. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A.  

From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 9:45 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons
 
This is becoming somewhat off topic, but since contamination of water
supplies is of general interest, I would like to add this.  The events
that Joe is referring to results from water from a city water supply
that was too acidic being distributed through household  lead supply
pipes.  Lead pipes are generally considered safe as long as the water
is neutral in pH, and the calcified lining of the pipe remains in
place.  This was not the case in Flint.   Flint is a case of a city
water treatment system that did not make the water safe for
distribution, and not contamination of the water.  Flint had changed
its water source, but had not altered the treatment system.
 The events that I referred to are a completely different and
unrelated incident.  I did say that the water affected is ground and
well water, and the long term solution is to connect to a city water
supply.  Many affected homes are too far from a town to be able to do
this.  The water repellent is commonly called PFAS, and is related to
Teflon.  Wolverine, a shoe manufacturer, used it and dumped barrels of
waste and waste leather in areas North of Grand Rapids, which became
piles of rusting, leaking  barrels.  PFAS has been found in many other
water supplies in the US, particularly around airports, where it is a
component in firefighting foam.  Anyone interested in further
information can search PFAS or Wolverine Worldwide.
Sandra




Re: Dyeing cons

Sara von Tresckow
 

Because one never knows the PH of city water which is treated with things to
make it safe, it is better not to keep on using the old fashioned lead pipe.
Fond du Lac has a similar replacement policy for older homes.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@...
Author of “When a Single Harness Simply Isn’t Enough”
http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/Öxabäck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning
needs


Re: Dyeing cons

Joe P
 

Hi Everyone 

If what I am reading is true. That led pipe is safe as long as the calcified lining stays in place. Then why would a city the size of Milwaukee be removing all of the led pipe? It is just not safe. 

Keep Weaving 
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A.  


From: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io> on behalf of bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 9:45 AM
To: weavetech@groups.io <weavetech@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [weavetech] Dyeing cons
 
This is becoming somewhat off topic, but since contamination of water
supplies is of general interest, I would like to add this.  The events
that Joe is referring to results from water from a city water supply
that was too acidic being distributed through household  lead supply
pipes.  Lead pipes are generally considered safe as long as the water
is neutral in pH, and the calcified lining of the pipe remains in
place.  This was not the case in Flint.   Flint is a case of a city
water treatment system that did not make the water safe for
distribution, and not contamination of the water.  Flint had changed
its water source, but had not altered the treatment system.
 The events that I referred to are a completely different and
unrelated incident.  I did say that the water affected is ground and
well water, and the long term solution is to connect to a city water
supply.  Many affected homes are too far from a town to be able to do
this.  The water repellent is commonly called PFAS, and is related to
Teflon.  Wolverine, a shoe manufacturer, used it and dumped barrels of
waste and waste leather in areas North of Grand Rapids, which became
piles of rusting, leaking  barrels.  PFAS has been found in many other
water supplies in the US, particularly around airports, where it is a
component in firefighting foam.  Anyone interested in further
information can search PFAS or Wolverine Worldwide.
Sandra




Re: Dyeing cons

Kati Meek
 

Thank you Ian Bowers,
For your educated view and calm good sense.  We have so much of "Chicken Little" these days,as regards pollution, COVID-19,  and other panics, spread via social media and many long-standing news sources, that it is a blessing to have access to reasonable, rational, good sense such as yours.  Thank you sincerely, Kati, Treehouse Studio, Alpena on the 45th


Re: Dyeing cons

bigwhitesofadog
 

This is becoming somewhat off topic, but since contamination of water
supplies is of general interest, I would like to add this. The events
that Joe is referring to results from water from a city water supply
that was too acidic being distributed through household lead supply
pipes. Lead pipes are generally considered safe as long as the water
is neutral in pH, and the calcified lining of the pipe remains in
place. This was not the case in Flint. Flint is a case of a city
water treatment system that did not make the water safe for
distribution, and not contamination of the water. Flint had changed
its water source, but had not altered the treatment system.
The events that I referred to are a completely different and
unrelated incident. I did say that the water affected is ground and
well water, and the long term solution is to connect to a city water
supply. Many affected homes are too far from a town to be able to do
this. The water repellent is commonly called PFAS, and is related to
Teflon. Wolverine, a shoe manufacturer, used it and dumped barrels of
waste and waste leather in areas North of Grand Rapids, which became
piles of rusting, leaking barrels. PFAS has been found in many other
water supplies in the US, particularly around airports, where it is a
component in firefighting foam. Anyone interested in further
information can search PFAS or Wolverine Worldwide.
Sandra


Re: Dyeing cons

Ian Bowers
 

As you say, it depends on what you are disposing. The waste from dyeing is low risk, should be well diluted and poured onto unused ground away from livestock.

Batteries, computers etc need their own disposal strategy.

Ian Bowers (Dr)
Managing Director
George Weil &Sons Ltd

On 15 Mar 2020, at 13:52, Diane via Groups.Io <horsofcors@...> wrote:

I have a question about disposing on rough land. Doesn’t it still make its way into the ground water and eventually in our drinking water. Be sure to dispose of old medications at your local approved disposal point. Call the police department. They often have a Dropbox for old medications or call your pharmacy. Old batteries need proper disposal. Not just into the trash and landfill. The lead acid batteries go into the ground and leach into the ground water. Electronics disposal is also important. Much of our old electronics once sent back to China were disposed of in landfills. The heavy metals were found in their water and bloodstreams leading to serious health problems and birth defects. Proper disposal is so important for many things. Sorry to get off track but hopefully the point is think before disposing of everything.

Diane

We are blessed each day,
may you be blessed as well.


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