Date   

Re: Looking for a certain kind of wool

bigwhitesofadog
 


Re: AVL Weaving School

Sharolene Brunston
 

Already signed up. This is a wonderful class and I'm so looking forward to it!  


Re: Looking for a certain kind of wool

Kati Meek
 

Congratulations Lala,  on your commission. 

You will want, indeed, a rather coarse wool like the outer coat of the Scandinavian sheep or even mohair. If I were you, I would inquire directly of Borgs Vavgarner at www.borgsvavganer.se  or Blomqvist/Nordiska at www.blomqvistgarn.se.  They can probably spin exactly what you want/need if it is not a regularly offered item of theirs.  Treadle with Joy, Kati

 

Kati Reeder Meek

Treehouse Studio

Alpena, USA on the 45th

katimeek.blogspot.com

krmeek@...

 

 


AVL Weaving School

Jannie Taylor <jtaylor@...>
 

I will be teaching a 2-day class on creating “Echo & Iris” style designs at the AVL Weaving School on January 23 & 24. There are still a few openings in this class, but you must sign up by end of business, December 18. This would be a wonderful Christmas gift to yourself – or for any weaver in your life.

 

Find a full description of the class and how to sign up at https://avllooms.com/collections/workshops/products/weavepoint-for-echo-and-iris

 

Jannie Taylor

 

 

 


Re: Looking for a certain kind of wool

jody Williams
 

Try Briggs and Little in Canada.  You can Google them.  You can call them and describe exactly what you need.  They are very obliging. Everything will have to go through customs, though.

Jody Williams

On Dec 11, 2019, at 11:39 AM, Lala de Dios <laladedios@...> wrote:

I wonder if anyone in the group can help me.

I am currently looking for a supplier of thin wool (in the range of 6-7 ends/cm for a balanced weave) strong enough to be used as warp. I might consider another animal hair fibre as long as it is strong. Feeling coarse would not be a problem at all.

I have been commisioned to weave a 5 metres long strip, about 50cm wide, to replace a similar strip in an old carpet that my customer bought in Istambul years ago. It looks like a tribal rug, perhaps from Central Asia. No patterns, just a set of different coloured strips of the same width stitched one to another lengthwise. The carpet is warp faced so I will probably use a 12-14 ends/cm setting or more. The carpet is very beautful with several ochres and tans plus indigo and it looks strikingly contemporary in its simplicity.

I need the thread in dark brown but that would not be a problem as I can dye myself probably with walnut to match the previous colour.

Any indication of a supplier that might carry that kind of rustic yarns would be greatly appreciated. No matter the continent… my customer is determined to do things as best as possible…and so am I of course.

Thanks in advance!

Lala de Dios
Indigo Estudio Textil
Ciempozuelos 3
28359 Titulcia - Madrid
Tel. 91 8010907 - 658059627
Fax 91 80104015



Re: Looking for a certain kind of wool

Lynne Chick <weaveworks2003@...>
 

Here is a link to a very nice yarn supplier here in Maine:   Wool Yarn :: Knitting, Weaving & Crochet Yarns at Halcyon Yarn


Lynne in Maine
Weave Works


 



Any indication of a supplier that might carry that kind of rustic yarns would be greatly appreciated. No matter the continent… my customer is determined to do things as best as possible…and so am I of course.

Thanks in advance!

Lala de Dios
Indigo Estudio Textil
Ciempozuelos 3
28359 Titulcia - Madrid
Tel. 91 8010907 - 658059627
Fax 91 80104015


Looking for a certain kind of wool

Lala de Dios
 

I wonder if anyone in the group can help me.

I am currently looking for a supplier of thin wool (in the range of 6-7 ends/cm for a balanced weave) strong enough to be used as warp. I might consider another animal hair fibre as long as it is strong. Feeling coarse would not be a problem at all.

I have been commisioned to weave a 5 metres long strip, about 50cm wide, to replace a similar strip in an old carpet that my customer bought in Istambul years ago. It looks like a tribal rug, perhaps from Central Asia. No patterns, just a set of different coloured strips of the same width stitched one to another lengthwise. The carpet is warp faced so I will probably use a 12-14 ends/cm setting or more. The carpet is very beautful with several ochres and tans plus indigo and it looks strikingly contemporary in its simplicity.

I need the thread in dark brown but that would not be a problem as I can dye myself probably with walnut to match the previous colour.

Any indication of a supplier that might carry that kind of rustic yarns would be greatly appreciated. No matter the continent… my customer is determined to do things as best as possible…and so am I of course.

Thanks in advance!

Lala de Dios
Indigo Estudio Textil
Ciempozuelos 3
28359 Titulcia - Madrid
Tel. 91 8010907 - 658059627
Fax 91 80104015


AVL parts

Laura Fry <laura@...>
 

I decommissioned my 1981 AVL PDL this summer and have been selling off parts of it.

This morning I posted to my blog:  http://laurasloom.blogspot.com a list of items I still have left.

Laura Fry


Re: travel to South America

Lala de Dios
 

Hi Sandra,

In Buenos Aires you can visit this exhibition:

Centenario. Homenaje a las artistas textiles de la Bauhaus
A century after the opening of the Bauhaus, four women artists pay tribute to the women who worked in their classrooms and workshops from 1919 -1933. Gabriela Nirino, Fernanda Piergallini, Eugenia Streb and Emilia Demichelis reflect from the textile the production of pieces made by Anni Albers, Gunta Stölzl, Benita Koch-Otte, and Otti Berger, inviting us to think about the impact of that work today. The exhibition runs until February 15, 2020

Av. Corrientes 1543
Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires 1093
Argentina

And then, of course, also in Buenos Aires you have CAAT Centro Argentino de Arte Textil. http://www.caat.org.ar
They usually have exhibitions. In the web you can find addresses.

Enjoy Buenos Aires and the scenery! it looks like a wonderful cruise!

Best.

Lala de Dios
Indigo Estudio Textil
Ciempozuelos 3
28359 Titulcia - Madrid
Tel. 91 8010907 - 658059627
Fax 91 80104015

El 5 dic 2019, a las 23:47, sandrarude <sandra@...> escribió:

Hello, all,

Is there anyone on this list who lives in Buenos Aires, Port Stanley, or Santiago? We will be on a Viking cruise in February, with brief stops in those 3 cities (scenic cruising the rest of the time ).

Thanks,

Sandra

--
Sandra Rude
Three Springs Handworks
3springshandworks.com/Textiles.htm
sandrarude.blogspot.com






Re: Wormy Chenille

bigwhitesofadog
 

Su, a different core had occured to me. I did a burn test on all four
colors, and all burned completely to black ash. However, it could be
rayon as well as cotton to do that I will take the yarns apart to see
what the cores are.


Re: Weaving Book

Anna Zinsmeister
 

Ethel Mairet was a wonderful author and weaver. She was one of Peter Collingwood's
mentors. Other books by her are "Vegetable Dyes", "Hand-Weaving and Education", and
"Hand-Weaving Notes for Teachers". There's also a short biography about her "A Weaver's
Life: Ethel Mairet 1872 - 1952" by Margot Coatts.
Anna Zinsmeister


Re: travel to South America

bonnieinouye@yahoo.com <bonnieinouye@...>
 

We spent a few days in Buenos Aires last February. There is a small ethnographic museum with textiles by indigenous people of the region including Mapuche. You can see textiles by Mapuche artists in Chile, too. The ethnographic museum includes tools used for weaving and spinning.


There are quite a few people, mostly women, using frame looms and thick materials to weave inexpensive items in plain weave. Some weavers use rigid heddle looms and there is a small shop in a tourist area of Buenos Aires with very nicely woven scarves and shawls woven with ribbons and fancy yarn by the delightful owner- I might be able to locate the card she gave me.

There is an area about 2 blocks long in Buenos Aires that is packed with yarn shops. Mostly knitting yarn but they have some on cones. There is a yarn industry in Argentina. However, I think you have some stash already.


Re: travel to South America

Virginia Glenn
 

HI Sandra - We have a guild member who is originally from Argentina and this is the info she gave me before my visit to BA.  

Hi Virginia, You will probably find out just as much as I or my husband Luis can suggest, being that we just went to visit family this last January. We have not played the tourists for over 8 to 9 years.

Places you may be interested in:   1. Cementerio La Recoleta, Evita use to be here, but my husband just told me  that she has been moved to be with Peron  * she still has a tomb there - and people are visiting - not sure where the body is
2. La Recoleta neighborhood
3. Caminito
4. San Telmo (I believe that the antique market is on the weekends)
5. Palermo ( They use to have an art fair, not sure when)
6. MALBA   Art Museum
7. Museo de Bellas Artes

I would definitely check with your hotel and or a tourist agency if you are working with one. 

Have a safe and wonderful time, Maria

And later I found this - http://www.caat.org.ar/

We were there for a week and I didn’t see much in the way of textiles.  We visited Rancho Santa Susana on a tour and there were a couple of textiles on exhibit there. If you’re at all interested in the Gaucho culture I’d do that tour.   I also happened upon an exhibit of handwoven Argentine textiles in a small shop when walking from the Recoleta cemetery to a fascinating bookstore called El Ataneo (https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/destinations/south-america/argentina/buenos-aires/things-to-see-beautiful-bookshop/) The bookstore is worth the visit.  When I asked the person in charge of the textile exhibit if they were woven by indigenous weavers he refused to use the word indigenous. From what I’ve learned, they don’t really acknowledge that they have much of an indigenous population.  I’m bilingual so the conversation was all in Spanish - so no misunderstandings.  Cultural commentary - Maria agreed.

We booked tours through Gray Line Argentina, Context travel and Viator - all were great.  I’m jealous of your trip and can’t wait to go back.  
And if you can visit Mendoza - for the wines - do it.  

Port Stanley is in the Falklands - which are the Malvinas according to the Argentines.  Remember the Falklands war and Britain.  They don’t think it’s settled.  I did buy some lovely hand spun wool there.  Someone told me that they only accepted British pounds in the Falklands so I changed money in BA. But they were wrong - they accepted dollars and euros and I ended having to spend the extra pounds so I bought wool.  Of course being “forced” to buy yarn doesn’t take much.  

Have a wonderful trip - Virginia

 

On Dec 5, 2019, at 3:47 PM, sandrarude <sandra@...> wrote:

Hello, all,

Is there anyone on this list who lives in Buenos Aires, Port Stanley, or Santiago? We will be on a Viking cruise in February, with brief stops in those 3 cities (scenic cruising the rest of the time ).

Thanks,

Sandra

--
Sandra Rude
Three Springs Handworks
3springshandworks.com/Textiles.htm
sandrarude.blogspot.com






Re: Wormy Chenille

Pat Bullen
 

Years ago, Ruth Lantz a guild member, was at a dinner engagement and her best friend was wearing
one of "It's A Ruth" handwoven business suit prototypes.  During the course of dinner, worms sprang out
all over the upper portion of her latest design.  She ended up having to hand reweave a different yarn into
everywhere the worms crawled out.  It made for levity for our meeting but cost her a lot of headache
and profit.  To this day I remember her mixed warps -- at least 30 colors and different yarns to create
marvelous fabrics.  Each garment was woven with a different color and each looked totally appropriate
to the design.  You had to look hard to realize they were all from the same warp.  Never had a problem
since with silk or cotton chenille, but acrylic and rayon needs sett very close and pack the hell out of it.


travel to South America

sandrarude
 

Hello, all,

Is there anyone on this list who lives in Buenos Aires, Port Stanley, or Santiago? We will be on a Viking cruise in February, with brief stops in those 3 cities (scenic cruising the rest of the time ).

Thanks,

Sandra

--
Sandra Rude
Three Springs Handworks
3springshandworks.com/Textiles.htm
sandrarude.blogspot.com


Re: Wormy Chenille

Ro Spinelli
 

Thank you, Su Butler for your description , makes total sense. I have woven with Rayon Chenille for years . Mostly scarves and loose fitting garments and have never had one piece worm. My chenille has come from anywhere, and everywhere… yarn sales, garage sales webs halcyon , you name it. I have never had a piece worm. I have mainly only used plain weave, at 16-18 eps, but I have beat it to death! I beat these projects very hard, feels like a board on loom, but always has soften luxuriously when wet finished and dried. I have relied on color and weave, and work in the warps with color changes and rainbow colored warps to form interest to the pieces, with success. My relatives, are still wearing scarves I gave them many years ago, ( my test group), and the scarves still look and are wearing great. Best advice I got as a beginner weaver, years ago c, concerning Chenille….. “ Chenille is a different animal…… you have to weave it specifically to tame its attributes…. not like other yarn, it has a mind of its own…………… when in doubt, beat like hell! “ ha ha ha ha .
Thank you Su, for your explanation.
Ro Spinelli


Re: Wormy Chenille

Amy N
 

I have had cotton chenille worm in the past.  Not all colors, but some.  Most of my cotton chenille is millend cones, so I can't be sure the original source.  I use 8/2 unmercerized cotton in the warp, with a sett of 24, and the only worming came with 4-end floats.

Amy


On Wed, Dec 4, 2019 at 1:37 PM bigwhitesofadog <sandra.eberhart@...> wrote:
This is not rayon chenille, it is cotton, and used as warp.  As I
mentioned, only one color wormed.
Sandra




Weaving Book

Joe P
 

I Everyone 

I went looking for a weave structure in my weaving books. that is like a needle in a hay stack. I found by accident a weaving book called Hand-Weaving To-Day traditions and changes by Ethel Mairet. The book is just one of those reads open the cover and start to read, I just did not want to stop. The book has a chapter about the Bauhaus. I am sure a lot of weavers would like to read. The book was wrote in 1939. A lot of the things weavers in 1939 questioned are the same things weavers in 2019 still struggling to find answers to. The book is timeless. It for the most part is a short read 137 pages. 

Keep weaving
Joe Bear in WI U.S.A.  


Re: Wormy Chenille

Sharon Schulze
 

That is such a satisfying answer! HAHA - I never liked the dye-makes-a-difference answer but I hadn’t heard anything else.
Thank you!
:-) Sharon

On Dec 4, 2019, at 3:16 PM, Su Butler <Teach2Weave@comcast.net> wrote:

I don't believe dye has anything to do with how chenille behaves. It is the core yarn that is responsible for most issue with chenille yarns, whether they are rayon or cotton or silk......the core yarns, at one point in time, were made of the same fiber as the pile. When this was the case, shrinkage and dimensional movement was pretty predictable. Then some wise person decided it would be OK to add one polyester to one of the core yarns. I am sure this was done for durability......there are over 100 kinds of chenille manufactured for all different purposes....occasionally some of all of it finds it way to our looms. We all know what happens when polyester and a natural fiber are subjected to environments where they shrink....the natural fiber does and the poly does not. This can cause worming issues. I suspect if you dig down deep and see what the core yarn is in your worming chenille you will find it is not the same fiber as the pile. Something to think about.

Su Butler





Re: Wormy Chenille

Su Butler
 

I don't believe dye has anything to do with how chenille behaves. It is the core yarn that is responsible for most issue with chenille yarns, whether they are rayon or cotton or silk......the core yarns, at one point in time, were made of the same fiber as the pile. When this was the case, shrinkage and dimensional movement was pretty predictable. Then some wise person decided it would be OK to add one polyester to one of the core yarns. I am sure this was done for durability......there are over 100 kinds of chenille manufactured for all different purposes....occasionally some of all of it finds it way to our looms. We all know what happens when polyester and a natural fiber are subjected to environments where they shrink....the natural fiber does and the poly does not. This can cause worming issues. I suspect if you dig down deep and see what the core yarn is in your worming chenille you will find it is not the same fiber as the pile. Something to think about.

Su Butler

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