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Re: storing reeds

Anne Wells <arwells@...>
 

Ruth Blau wrote:

I read somewhere that someone used an old golf bag for this purpose. I have
some reeds in an umbrella stand.
I had understood from some past, dim memory that it's not a good idea to
store reeds upright. That you should either lay them flat or suspend them
upright (i.e., hang them). Is this an old weaver's tale? ...
No, this is correct. I know of at least one weaver who stored reeds standing up,
and over the years, they have warped slightly. I have one reed that is slightly
warped, too, from being stored in an upright position. It is worse for longer
reeds than for short reeds.
Anne
arwells@erols.com


Re: storing reeds, Gilmore looms

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

I read somewhere that someone used an old golf bag for this purpose. I have
some reeds in an umbrella stand.
I had understood from some past, dim memory that it's not a good idea to store reeds upright. That you should either lay them flat or suspend them upright (i.e., hang them). Is this an old weaver's tale? My reeds lie flat on the floor under a work table. They're out of the way & not hard to get to when I need to change reeds.

I agree w/ Francie that the Gilmore looms are wonderful. I have the 8-shaft Little Gem workshop loom, and I think it's the sturdiest workshop loom on the market. I loathe the Gilmore tieup system, however, and have converted my Little Gem to texsolv. I first saw this loom at Convergence at Portland (my first Convergence). As the preconference workshops were breaking up, I saw many people wheeling these looms out of the conference center. Gilmore looms aren't very well known on the east coast, and my reaction was, "What *is* that nifty loom???"

By the time I got around to ordering one, they had discontinued the 8-shaft model. I asked (this is when Mr. Gilmore was still alive) how many looms would have to be ordered for them to make a special run. "Oh, about 3," I was told. Working through the internet, we put together an order of 14, and they did a special production run for us. I believe subsequently (a year or so later) another group got together & the Gilmores did another special run.

Isn't it nice to have responsive vendors?

Ruth


Re: gathering info about studios

janee233
 

--- In WeaveTech@y..., LHolzbach@a... wrote:
I read somewhere that someone used an old golf bag for this
purpose. I have
some reeds in an umbrella stand.
My reeds, sticks, switfts, rolls of warp paper, rulers, pickup
sticks, raddle and temple are stored in the large white plastic
tubs (5 gallon?) that painters/plasterers use. They were
originally bought to soak/rinse yarns while dyeing, but I'll need to
get more when I start dyeing again as these are fully occupied.

Jane


Re: Storing reeds....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I think reeds are perfectly happy standing up. As long as they are
standing UP and not LEANING!
We've been standing reeds ( longest are 62" ) vertically since 1976 with no
warping or bowing. I have a sketch of our reed stand at:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/gallery/view?username=billk
It holds nine reeds.
Here in CA, I secure the stand to the wall with a hook, for our little shaky
quakes.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Collingwood Appreciation & Fiber Art

willgee@...
 

Peter, glad you are back! You ARE indispensible.

About the Fiber Art position, I've had many successful friends in the
field here in the Bay Area, most notably Barbara Shawcroft, whose
studio I lived in for a year while she taught at Boston U. These local
fiber artists quickly left me behind, by miles. I think I was just
made to be a happy small production weaver with the occasional art
piece.

My own experience and I think several others I've known would agree
that some of the most valuable education as weavers/fiber whatevers,
was in the fine arts and art history classes, not our weaving classes.
Mine was in art school at Kansas City Art Institute. Drawing,painting,
calligraphy, sculpture, industrial design based on Bauhaus precepts,
all added up to make one "think like an artist" My first love,
incidentally, was high fire handmade porcelain; then I came to San
Francisco and met Trude Guermonprez and that changed things
completely. Trude, I can say, to me represented true genius in the
textile world. Her impact on many of us was immeasurable. glen b.


Low Profile Looms....Gilmore

willgee@...
 

Hi..for many many years I wove professionally on two Gilmores. They
were the old rigid ones..no folding parts. They were big and heavy and
came apart easily for threading. Had an 8 frame 46" and a 4 frame 56"
or 60" I can't remember. Gave one to the weaving class here in SF, and
sold one to a friend, who later passed on again. Still weaving well
after 50 years or more. I was shocked at how noisy they were when I
had a student weaving on one on the second floor and I went downstairs
to the kitchen. Loud! glen black


Re: gathering info about studios

Ingrid Boesel <ingrid@...>
 

At 11:33 PM 8/18/2001, you wrote:
I read somewhere that someone used an old golf bag for this purpose. I have
some reeds in an umbrella stand.
I think that you could make a box very easily and then drill holes on both sides an inch from the top and another series about 1 inch from the bottom and insert a dowel in each pair of holes. I would make the box fairly tall if all the reeds were long with three rows of dowels. Or staggered heights if there are different lengths of reeds.

I once saw a shallow box about 1 ft square with a 4x4" post about 3.5 ft high in the center. Wooden dowels were inserted into the post near the top, and reeds rested against the dowels and the lip of the shallow box. It seemed there was not enough support to stop the reeds from sagging in the middle.

How about a Sona tube, those cardboard tubes that they use to cast footings for porches. You can get 8 or 9 inch diameter tubes, cut them at various lengths and fasten them together to hold long and short reeds. As long as there are 3 of them, they should be stable. You can paint them as well.

All dimensions are approximate and from dim memories <G>
Ingrid Boesel, the weaving half of Fiberworks PCW

Visit us at: http://www.fiberworks-pcw.com
Email: ingrid@fiberworks-pcw.com


Re: Looms with Low Profiles...

Russell Currier <russell.currier@...>
 

I couldn't agree with you more.

Kyo Currier, also in Alaska

----- Original Message -----
From: "Alcorn" <alcorn@pop.nwlink.com>
To: <WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, August 18, 2001 4:04 PM
Subject: Re: [WeaveTech] Looms with Low Profiles...


I am very surprised that no one has mentioned the beautiful and wonderful
Gilmore as a low profile loom. It is very sturdy, and has the ratchet and
pawl breaking system. The wood is a gorgeous clear unstained maple. With
8 shafts you get 14 treadles. It can only be ordered from the factory
which saves a good bit of money. With a weight bar added to the beater
one
can easily beat hard enough for rugs for a long time and not damage the
loom. It is such a sweet loom, a real class act.

Francie Alcorn



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Re: Looms with Low Profiles...

Ingrid Boesel <ingrid@...>
 

My choice of 8 shaft looms (alphabetical) all good sturdy looms
AVL: Home loom easy side tieup
Louet: Spring
Schacht: Mighty Wolf with or without the high castle
Kris had said she was interested in rugs/weft faced
weaving/tapestry. Beware of the Mighty Wolf (or IMHO *any* X-frame loom)
for rugs or other heavy duty work. You probably won't be happy w/ the
tension, and if you do a lot of rugs on an MW, you'll beat it to death. I
believe Schacht itself urges that you not weave too many rugs per year on
the MW.

Sorry, I meant the full frame Schacht loom, whose name I cannot remember, not the x frame. I don't know if the full frame is still made

And I forgot the Woolhouse great sturdy looms but usually overhead beater and CM

I know the Jmade had non computer looms but I have not seen them. But looking at the JComp, my feeling is that this would be a really well made loom.

The Gilmore does not make my list because of the rachet and pawl brake, but then I do not weave rugs.

And the Louet Delta is the replacement for the Hollandia, low profile, lower than the Megado, sturdy enough for rugs, 8 or 12 shafts. (and you could probably special order the wider loom with 8 shafts and 14 treadles)


Ingrid Boesel, the weaving half of Fiberworks PCW

Visit us at: http://www.fiberworks-pcw.com
Email: ingrid@fiberworks-pcw.com


Re: gathering info about studios

Robin Burk <studio@...>
 

Thanks, Lorrie. I'll see what the price is through Unicorn ... when I
asked through another vendor earlier this year, the quote was $425. Ouch!

Robin


Re: Looms with Low Profiles...

Alcorn <alcorn@...>
 

I am very surprised that no one has mentioned the beautiful and wonderful
Gilmore as a low profile loom. It is very sturdy, and has the ratchet and
pawl breaking system. The wood is a gorgeous clear unstained maple. With
8 shafts you get 14 treadles. It can only be ordered from the factory
which saves a good bit of money. With a weight bar added to the beater one
can easily beat hard enough for rugs for a long time and not damage the
loom. It is such a sweet loom, a real class act.

Francie Alcorn


Re: gathering info about studios

LHolzbach@...
 

I read somewhere that someone used an old golf bag for this purpose. I have
some reeds in an umbrella stand. Others I keep in their original shipping
boxes in an upstairs closet. Most of my reeds are stainless steel, but I
don't like to store anything metal in the basement.
Lorrie


Re: gathering info about studios

LHolzbach@...
 

Robin,
I don't know if they still have them, but Glimakra used to have a stand for
storing reeds, sticks, etc. Check with Glimakra/Unicorn in California.
Lorrie


Re: Looms with Low Profiles...

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

Ingrid wrote:

My choice of 8 shaft looms (alphabetical) all good sturdy looms
AVL: Home loom easy side tieup
Louet: Spring
Schacht: Mighty Wolf with or without the high castle
Kris had said she was interested in rugs/weft faced weaving/tapestry. Beware of the Mighty Wolf (or IMHO *any* X-frame loom) for rugs or other heavy duty work. You probably won't be happy w/ the tension, and if you do a lot of rugs on an MW, you'll beat it to death. I believe Schacht itself urges that you not weave too many rugs per year on the MW.

Ruth


Re: Looms with Low Profile

Laura MacCary <lmaccary@...>
 

In my opinion, the big problem with the low-profile loom design is that you
are pretty much forced to use a rising-shed jack mechanism. And one problem
with this mechanism is the difficulty of lifting many shafts. Some looms are
easier to treadle than others, because the designer paid attention to
leverage, but in general they're harder to treadle and can have fussier
(smaller or less clean) sheds than CB or CM looms. I understand that they
can also have problems with certain unbalanced weave structures. I hear CB
or CM looms can sometimes be better for these because the rising/falling
tension on the threads is equal, so the difference in take-up is minimized.

The 2 big advantages of the rising-shed jack looms are the low profile and
the ability to press more than one treadle at a time (difficult on a CM loom
unless you use a special tie-up) and get a large shed (difficult on a CB
when pressing multiple treadles unless you have a shed regulator).

These differences are minimal with 4 shafts, but become noticeable with 8 or
more. I'd be interested in your opinions on loom designs that can have 8 or
more shafts but minimize these limitations?

I tried out the Megado at the ANWG conference, and I'm impressed with the
way the back beam moves when treadling to improve the shed. I think this
design minimizes some of the problems associated with jacks, and the loom is
lower-profile than many large or multishaft looms (though not truly
low-profile). But it can only be used as a computer loom, there is not an 8
shaft version of the design, with treadles, to my knowledge.

What other models take these problems into account? Can these different
problems even be resolved?
Laura


Cranbrook Loom for sale

Jessica Speer <speerj@...>
 

I'm selling my 62 inch 8 H Cranbrook. Contact me privately for details
Jessica Speer speerj@mid-pen.lib.mi.us


Re: Looms with Low Profiles...

Ingrid Boesel <ingrid@...>
 

Hi Chris
Why not investigate the various loom manufacturers by looking at their websites.
If you go to Ruthe Stowe's Weaving resources and click on looms, you will get links to all the loom manufactures you ever dreamed of

http://home.interlynx.net/~rstowe/

Some of the "high profile" looms are easy to see through and others are not. The Counterbalanced looms from LeClerc are easy to see through as there are only 3 rollers high up

Others are hard to see through. Go have a look at websites

My choice of 8 shaft looms (alphabetical) all good sturdy looms
AVL: Home loom easy side tieup
Louet: Spring
Schacht: Mighty Wolf with or without the high castle




Ingrid Boesel, the weaving half of Fiberworks PCW

Visit us at: http://www.fiberworks-pcw.com
Email: ingrid@fiberworks-pcw.com


Re: gathering info about studios

Ann Shafer
 

My studio has been built off the side of our house and is 12' by 29' and in
spite of the large size it could be larger! It's a case of my filling up the
space very, very easily!! Since it's off the dining and living rooms it is
carpeted the same as the other rooms are. I would love to have a 'messy'
area(well, it sometimes is messy anyway <gg>) to do painting of warp, dyeing,
etc. But it is my favorite room in the whole house and one which I love to
retreat to. Ann Shafer


Looms with Low Profiles...

jaakaa@...
 

The Megado is a 32-shaft computer-aided loom manufactured by Louet.
If you're not interested in lots of shafts or CAW, this loom isn't
for you.
Boy, I'll say, Ruth! Whew! Not being a "complex weaver" - though I
admire, greatly, those who are, holding them in utter awe and
fascination! - you're right.

However, I would really like to hear from anyone about lower profile
looms that would be suitable for rug/weft faced/tapestry weaving.

Kris in Alaska


Re: Looms with Low Profile

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

could you give us more information about this
loom? <snip> To clarify: it's not a dobby, or many shafts I would
need - 8, in my case, but information/experience from others about
resources for low profile looms would be greatly appreciated.
The Megado is a 32-shaft computer-aided loom manufactured by Louet. If you're not interested in lots of shafts or CAW, this loom isn't for you. And tho the profile is certainly lower than a full-frame AVL, I don't find the Megado an especially low profile. About as high as a Schacht high-castle floor loom, I'd say.

Ruth
whose internet provider (ComCast) has chosen today to be cranky. We're getting to your digest/indiv msg switches as fast as we can, but ComCast has thrown its sabot into the works--an appropiately weaverly reference.

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