Date   

Re: Don't throw it in the garbage

Anne Oglevie
 

You may give the samples to a new weaver they will really appreciate them especially if you can give an explanation 


On Sep 5, 2014, at 8:03 AM, "lkoslofsky@... [WeaveTech]" <WeaveTech@...> wrote:

 

Good Morning!
One message said she had a garbage bag full of samples she was going to throw away. Please don't!

You can:

 give the samples to a school, church, camp,  or girl/boy scouts group for art projects

Put it on craig's list for free, someone would love to use them for a project or quilt

put the pieces in  smaller bags and give to good will

If it's a natural fiber, compost it

ask an animal shelter if they could use them for bedding

see if a local quilter or quilt guild can use them

See if a church group is making donation quilts and if they can use them.


There are other possible uses that others may have.

Louise in NC




Don't throw it in the garbage

Louise K
 

Good Morning!
One message said she had a garbage bag full of samples she was going to throw away. Please don't!

You can:

 give the samples to a school, church, camp,  or girl/boy scouts group for art projects

Put it on craig's list for free, someone would love to use them for a project or quilt

put the pieces in  smaller bags and give to good will

If it's a natural fiber, compost it

ask an animal shelter if they could use them for bedding

see if a local quilter or quilt guild can use them

See if a church group is making donation quilts and if they can use them.


There are other possible uses that others may have.

Louise in NC




NYT: looms & computers

RBlau <ruthblau@...>
 

An article on p. A 18 in today's (Sept. 5) New York Times gives a nod to the evolution of the Jacquard loom into the Hollerith "counting machine" and from there to modern-day computers.

http://tinyurl.com/lcd2qs4

It's an interesting article, tho mainly focused on knitting machines.

This may be behind a paywall.  Apologies if it is.  As print-edition subscribers, we also have access to the online Times.

Ruth
-- 
www.blueloomdesigns.com


Re: In Praise of Slow/Suffocation

Stacey Harvey-Brown
 

....' the 
Olympic approach to weaving. I weave "insert feat here": faster, finer 
threads, more ends per inch, more colors, with more shuttles, more 
shafts, wider, longer . . .All that matters is the result. Is it good cloth or does it suck?  Marg'

Whilst I agree with Marg in general, for me it isn't even the result - it's whether I'm having fun with my ideas.  Those ideas, and the failures that inevitably accompany wild and whacky ideas (and they seem to be the ones that get me invigorated!), are what spur me on, and using stash is a way to focus some of those ideas.  It takes a long time, and lots of samples, to hone ideas, and develop things that can then be produced, whether as artwork or functional (and/or both!) and time to process ideas is also very necessary and easily overlooked or rushed in a fast world.  

I love the thoughts that many people have expressed in both topics of In Praise of Slow and Suffocation and it is really reassuring to know that so many of us are of similar mind but with many different approaches.  Thanks to all who have contributed to both of these threads.  

My mother-in-law has very recently died and left everything so well organised that there is very little extra emotional stress on top of the natural grief of relatives.  This is more of a blessing than I ever realised before and has made me very aware that my only child would have a nightmare trying to deal with all my weaving paraphernalia on top of what would be a very emotional time.  So this particular thread is very timely for me and has focused my mind on ensuring that I think about the inheritance aspect of my 10 looms and all the associated equipment, yarns, books and samples.  Mind you, I will need to live at least 10 years to get it all in order, I suspect!!  But no time like the present to make a start.  Although one hopes to have at least 3 score years and 10, you never know what's around the corner.....  
In the meantime, Happy Weaving!!  
Warmest wishes, 

UK Stacey


Re: In Praise of Slow

Marg Coe <margcoe@...>
 

Excellent!  I've had a creeping distaste for what I've dubbed the Olympic approach to weaving.  I weave "insert feat here": faster, finer threads, more ends per inch, more colors, with more shuttles, more shafts, wider, longer . . .

All that matters is the result.  Is it good cloth or does it suck?

Marg
_____________________________________________
4-8 ... Weave!, 2bT, D4tF, F2bT, Weft-Faced
Want to know what these mean?
Go to: www.e-weaving.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/eWeaveDesign
_____________________________________________

On 9/3/14, 4:38 AM, Jette Vandermeiden drawloom@... [WeaveTech] wrote:
 

In the book by Nhat Hanh called Miracle of Mindfulness he reminds us to make the eating of an orange and the washing of dishes an act of being in the moment. Enjoy the peeling, the sensation of the skin, the juice of the orange, the

soap suds, the feeling of the water over your hands.
Weaving is just like that. Enjoy the moment. The feel of the fibre, the thump of the beater. Who really cares how much we produce? Weaving is a sensation, a full body and mind experience. We do it to feel good. Our society trains us to be productive and useful. We sometimes forget that being productive does not necessarily mean producing many items, but it means being a wholesome person. Live each moment. Love your craft.
Weave slow. Become a drawloom weaver!
Our stash? That felt good to buy and touch and dream about. And possibly use. Let it go.

Jette Vandermeiden
Teanaustaye Textiles



Re: Suffocation

Ingo Liebig
 


Hi Linda,

Thank you for writing about this. Your thoughts and the whole serious diskussion is helpfull for me. I've got many yarns from several weavers who stopped weaving because of illness or age. I feel the responsibility to use this yarns - pretty linen yarn - up to  60 year old. But I feel unable to do their work.
It needs time till this yarn will be my own and I can do my weaving with this.

I hope you can understand this, English is not my first language and such philosophic thoughts are hard to express.

Brigitte

South Germany


 



---In WeaveTech@..., <tomlin@...> wrote :

I find that today, Labor Day, I am pondering a laborious subject and wondering how many others are also. With 40 years of weaving, I am feeling the weight of all those years, a suffocating weight. Not pounds on my body though they are there! Rather, shelves and other containers overflowing with yarn; drawers and closets full of “new” handwoven goods; a home full of handwoven pillows, table linens, wall hangings and rugs, most of which will never wear out in my lifetime; bags and boxes of samples; book cases straining under the weight of books, magazines, study group notebooks, record sheets, etc.

 

 

 

 


Re: In Praise of Slow

Linda Davis <tomlin@...>
 

I agree! Wonderful reminder, and I will also print out and put on my bulletin board as a constant reminder. Thanks, Jette and everyone else who commented on this thread.

Linda

 

 

 

Handwoven Creations

 


dealing with excess

Laura Fry Weaving Studio <laura@...>
 

On 9/4/2014 7:16 AM, 'Darlene Wainwright' knitterdar@... [WeaveTech] wrote:
 

 

Is it possible that a collection of excess could be gathered at regional or national conventions? I suggest at conferences to eliminate the need and expense of shipping – bring it along. The donors’ names could be affixed to each woven piece as I’m sure so many would love to have work done by specific weavers.

I think this is a terrific idea.  The next ANWG conference will be in Victoria, BC in '17.  Plenty of time to contact the conference organizers and see if they are interested? 

cheers,
Laura Fry
http://laurasloom.blogspot.com



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Re: In Praise of Slow

Rebecca Mezoff
 

Great thoughts on this thread.
Weave tapestry! It is very slow and you are unlikely to accumulate many tapestries each year... They make lovely gifts and there aren't enough tapestry weavers. You can weave it right on one of those floor looms.
Cheers!
Rebecca


suffocation

Darlene Wainwright
 

As I read some very well thought out posts I can’t help but be amazed at the wonderful world of plenty represented in our group. Many express thoughts of what will happen when…. The thought of our treasures ending up in a dumpster is unacceptable to me and I’m sure many others.

 

Is it possible that a collection of excess could be gathered at regional or national conventions? I suggest at conferences to eliminate the need and expense of shipping – bring it along. The donors’ names could be affixed to each woven piece as I’m sure so many would love to have work done by specific weavers. Bundles of cones of yarn would be a fun auction and real treats for newer weavers. A silent/live auction or something of that nature could be held for  items and the money raised to go to scholarships, donations to 3rd world weaving centres charities or any other cause the group chose. If items were large perhaps a tax receipt could be provided, I live in Canada and certainly don’t know all the ins and outs of such things. It just strikes me that we, as a weaving community, could come together to give meaningful contributions where it might be most needed and appreciated while decreasing the amount of ‘stuff’ those coming behind us need to deal with in the future.

 

Darlene Wainwright

knitterdar@...

 


Re: Suffocation

Patricia Fear <pastief@...>
 

Dear Linda your samples may be small but if they are of wool or indeed other closely woven fibers they could be so useful to patchwork makers, we pay a small fortune for bits and pieces of woven fiber.  In fact there is a Japanese lady who does nothing from anything large - so if you have not thrown already see if you can find a patchwork group interested, there is nothing more lovely than patchwork or applique from handwoven material in my opinion.

Patsie


On Tuesday, 2 September 2014, 20:22, "'Linda Davis' tomlin@... [WeaveTech]" wrote:


 
Wow! What an incredible response. I am not surprised. I knew this group could help me focus and perk me up. It’s comforting to know that so many have faced and/or are facing this same issue. Some remarks that particularly speak to me are:
·        Focus on what I really want to do – my passion. I need to forget about dish towels and baby blankets, for example, which always seem like drudge work for me, and focus only on those things that make my heart sing when I weave them (e.g., scarves, yardage/garments and runners).
·        “Thin the herd” – several ideas on thinning out equipment, yarns and books. I am making a list now. For example, I will sell the beautiful kumihimo muradai that I have had for 20 years and have not used for 15, among other items.
·        Give to charity and fund-raising auctions. I do some of that but need to make more of a concerted effort to find others.
·        Don’t become so attached to end products (e.g., samples) and be afraid to let them go. Two large bags of samples in my garage (most of which are duplicates anyway and have no useful purpose), will go in the garbage with only a cursory culling of anything that might actually be useful. Another bag full of not bad, but not great, weavings will go to our Habitat for Humanity store.
·        “Slow cloth” and specific art pieces. Rather than thinking I need to work like mad to use up the stash I keep, go more slowly and weave things that are a joy even if they might take a while to complete.
·        Don’t worry too much about where things end up when I’m gone, but be considerate of those who may have to dispose of my things. Plan ahead at least some!
·        Enjoy the process of now!
As for guild sales, we have tried that in years past but our area is too small and it has not been successful, but times might be changing and we need to reconsider this, I think. We do have periodic “weftover sales” of guild members only to sell their items to each other.
Thanks to everyone for all of the great ideas and the energy booster. I have already started cleaning out and it is a good feeling. Still some hard choices lie ahead but I think I can do this. Sounds crazy but I feel like I have been given permission to follow some of my inclinations that I was not sure about.
 
Linda
 
 



Woven Together--an exhibit by members of Tapestry Weavers South

Scanlin Tommye
 

I hope you'll be able to visit the upcoming exhibit of tapestries by members of Tapestry Weavers South.  It will be held at the University of North Georgia Library Technology Center, Dahlonega campus, Dahlonega, Georgia, USA, October 1-31.  


Over twenty TWS members will have works in the exhibit.  Also on display will be tapestries by three invited artists: Joan Baxter who will be teaching a workshop for TWS during the first week of October in Dahlonega; Silvia Heyden; and Jon Eric Riis.


There will be an opening reception on October 8 at 5:30 and Joan Baxter will give an artist talk following that, beginning around 6:30 in room 328 of the Library Technology Center.  For hours of the library, please consult  this web page (look for the hours of the Dahlonega campus):  Library Hours


As you know, tapestry weaving is one of the ultimate "slow cloth" methods and the works on display will be the tangible records of hundreds of hours spent at our tapestry looms!


I hope to see you at the reception!

Tommye Scanlin




Re: In Praise of Slow, and why we make things

RBlau <ruthblau@...>
 

If youre not making mistakes youre not trying hard enough.
In a long-ago part of my life, I taught figure skating to youngsters. Of course, the first job of learning to skate is simply to be able to stay upright. But after that stage, if a student said, "I didn't fall down today at all," we instructors would say, "Then you weren't trying anything new."

We all have to fall down when we venture into new areas.

Ruth

--
www.blueloomdesigns.com


Re: In Praise of Slow, and why we make things

Inga Marie Carmel
 

I never really understood the need for "quick projects" so beloved by the magazines.  If I need cloth that badly I can buy it!  For me the making and exploring and the thinking and the planning is the  fun part, it's like a good mystery novel where I wonder how it will turn out.  I'm slowly working my way though the COE now and it's absolute heaven for me-- I only have to 'produce' a 7x10 sample in most cases and I get to play and explore and learn while feeling that ultimately I'm doing 'something'.  

Here's a president's letter I wrote for the upcoming Guild newsletter, that touches on some of that. I think the next one will be about SLOW, thank you Jette for sharing that I loved it! 

Why Make Things?

Why weave or spin  when it’s so easy to go to the store and just buy cloth and yarn? What is it about creating that we all like so much?  I think it’s probably hard-wired into us as humans, a result of those pesky opposable thumbs and big brains that separate us out from other animals.  I asked my 17 year old son the same question, he’s a big ‘maker’.  His answer:  it feels productive without being stressful like the things I have to do (like homework or college applications!).  Think of the word ‘grasp’, it means both “to understand” and “to hold’. We have intelligence in our hands,  our ability to hold things and to think -- our thumbs and our brains -- are intimately connected.

For me, personally, the process is always the really interesting part. The exploration and the making of mistakes, the experimentation. I tell my weaving students “If you’re not making mistakes you’re not trying hard enough”.  It’s not your inborn skill that matters as much as your motivation to learn.

As we head into fall and hopefully cooler weather, I want to encourage everyone to try something new, make some mistakes, enjoy the journey, discover something about yourself or your craft,  and fire up those looms and wheels!


marie

Inga Marie Carmel
An interesting plainness is the most difficult and precious thing to achieve -  Mies van der Rohe


Glimokra countermarche loom for sale

Jane Orr Drevo
 

Great sturdy loom with deep frame.  47". 8 shafts, 10 treadles, texsolv heddles, warping sticks with  holder.

Shaft holders with pins, adjustable bench , 10 dent. 52 inch reed, raddle, glimokra warping board.

$2300 located in Delaware, please contact off list for pictures



Re: Convergence RI 2014

Inga Marie Carmel
 

i  had a great time. The tapestry workshop I took I took with Rebecca Mezoff was fantastic as were the 3 seminars from Karen Donde, Robyn Spadey and Suzi Ballenger. I stayed for a week and enjoyed every moment.

Things I would change-- the lighting in the exhibit hall was terrible, really didn't do the pieces justice.  I know textiles need low lighting but this was too low.  I wish the yardage had been hung were I could have found it more easily (I did eventually).  Finally-- I'd like to suggest that the primary craft for a given workshop/ seminar be clear in the description in the catalog. I mistakenly signed up for one I thought was about weaving 'textiles that shape themselves' that turned out to essentially be a sewing class.  I have no interest at all in that, but happily the people at the registration desk allowed me to change.  

marie


Inga Marie Carmel
An interesting plainness is the most difficult and precious thing to achieve -  Mies van der Rohe


Re: In Praise of Slow

Robert Lucas <robbon2@...>
 

What a wonderful perspective on weaving.

Slow down, and enjoy the moment, without attempting to reach a time limit or any other distraction to ruin the experience.

I have to print this out and place it near my loom as a constant reminder.

Again, THANKS!

Rob

On Sep 3, 2014, at 7:38 AM, Jette Vandermeiden drawloom@... [WeaveTech] wrote:

 

In the book by Nhat Hanh called Miracle of Mindfulness he reminds us to make the eating of an orange and the washing of dishes an act of being in the moment. Enjoy the peeling, the sensation of the skin, the juice of the orange, the

soap suds, the feeling of the water over your hands.
Weaving is just like that. Enjoy the moment. The feel of the fibre, the thump of the beater. Who really cares how much we produce? Weaving is a sensation, a full body and mind experience. We do it to feel good. Our society trains us to be productive and useful. We sometimes forget that being productive does not necessarily mean producing many items, but it means being a wholesome person. Live each moment. Love your craft.
Weave slow. Become a drawloom weaver!
Our stash? That felt good to buy and touch and dream about. And possibly use. Let it go.

Jette Vandermeiden
Teanaustaye Textiles



Re: Suffocation

kathyo
 

After over 16 years of machine quilting for the public, I can truely identify with Marta's fabric stash and her reluctance to give it away... ;)

I made "blankies" and donated them by the hundreds to animal shelters for several years!

Tote bags are on the list now....
kathyo


Re: In Praise of Slow

Jette Vandermeiden
 

In the book by Nhat Hanh called Miracle of Mindfulness he reminds us to make the eating of an orange and the washing of dishes an act of being in the moment. Enjoy the peeling, the sensation of the skin, the juice of the orange, the

soap suds, the feeling of the water over your hands.
Weaving is just like that. Enjoy the moment. The feel of the fibre, the thump of the beater. Who really cares how much we produce? Weaving is a sensation, a full body and mind experience. We do it to feel good. Our society trains us to be productive and useful. We sometimes forget that being productive does not necessarily mean producing many items, but it means being a wholesome person. Live each moment. Love your craft.
Weave slow. Become a drawloom weaver!
Our stash? That felt good to buy and touch and dream about. And possibly use. Let it go.

Jette Vandermeiden
Teanaustaye Textiles


Re: Suffocation response to Marta

Louise Yale
 

Cut the fabric in strips and use it as weft in rag rugs.

Louise in Northern CA

-----

On 9/2/2014 5:38 PM, 'Marta Sullivan' martasullivan@... [WeaveTech] wrote:
 

It is interesting to hear how many people have handwoven fabric that they don’t know what to do with.  I don’t have this problem but do have a huge amount of store bought fabric and absolutely hate to just give it away.

 

I have been looking at ways to make purses and bags.  My granddaughter made some really nice pouches that had a squared off bottom and a zipper on top.  They didn’t look hard to make.  I also have been toying around with bento bags.  There are several patterns on the internet but the one that I like is just a piece of fabric, hemmed, that is 3 times as long as wide.  It is then folded and there is some small seaming.  A strap can be attached at the corners.    I found another pattern for a pouch bag with a similar shape from some magazine from the 60s.  Very retro,! both, and in style.

 

Throw pillows are easy to make and would be pretty in a heavier fabric. 

 

The problem is that I have been pulling out stuff and have it all over.  I need to get cutting and sewing.

 

Marta

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