Date   

T braking mechanism on Vietnamese frame loom

Deb McClintock <debmcclintock@...>
 

With all the discussion of brake release mechanisms I thought folks might want to check out the Vietnamese loom used by several ethnic groups. It's a t shape wood handle over the weaver that interacts with the back beam. First movie on left.

http://www.mytripjournal.com/travel-649874

It also works with a twist brake on the cloth beam that is twisted loose to release the cloth beam tension. Simple use of wood, rope and the weaver's body.

Regards Deb Mc


Re: linen weaves

Dawn McCarthy <thebloominloom@...>
 

I think that type of warp beam can be seen in some of the North England Museums. I know both methods were used. Manchester has a great Textile Museum and there is also Quarry Bank Mill and Helmshore. In the back of the Shire book "The Woollen Industry" by Chris Aspin there is a list of places to visit. I am sure UK Weave Tech members might have more specifics.

I haven't been home in some time so not sure exact locations, I know when studying and growing up we toured numerous museums and homes. Macclesfield has the silk mill, if you catch the tour guide on the right day, he'll let you weave on the jacquard looms!

Dawn



On Aug 11, 2012, at 7:02 PM, Hndwvnds <hndwvnds@ccrtc.com> wrote:

I have an old Anders Levard with a wooden 'arm' that has a cord to be pulled
which releases the rear gear to take off the tension of the back beam. I
don't know how old this loom is so I'm guessing around 60 years or older.
But in loom ages, 60 isn't all that old is it.

The older looms I have from the 1800's (American) use the system called
'shaft bore'. A long wooden rod is stuck into one of the holes that are
spaced equally around the back beam on one end. The shaft (stick)
generally has a cord to hold the end closest to the weaver in an up position
to move the warp forward. Removing the shaft from the hole releases the
warp and the weaver then winds forward with the front gear (often an old saw
blade or in one of my looms, a metal strip bent into 'hills'). When the
warp was sufficiently moved forward, the shaft bore was put into the next
closest hole on the warp beam. It holds the tension quite well.

Dawn, have you seen any of these in England? cheers, Kathleen ps we
travel fairly often to England (husband is from Surrey) and I have not seen
the shaft bore there----perhaps I just haven't gone to the right places.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dawn McCarthy" <thebloominloom@yahoo.com>
To: <WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, August 11, 2012 6:29 PM
Subject: Re: [WeaveTech] linen weaves

I myself am quite familiar with live weight tension, I built my own as a
second beam on my countermarch, I have also seen all different types in
historical scenarios (I grew up in the textile mecca of Manchester England)
and the National Trust does a good job of preserving past artifacts and
equipment.

My question is did the Scandinavian countries favor the static or as I
think of it "locked" tension as opposed to live weight, leading to the
style of looms today such as Glimakra etc. Was it just a matter of
whatever system was available?

I weave rugs and sometimes lace and wools on my Toika so I like the option
of using the ratchet & pawl or the home made live weight tension.
Ultimately it comes down to the weaver having control over the tension and
quality of weaving, but I am curious if the loom design is particular to
certain regions or countries.

Dawn


On Aug 11, 2012, at 2:59 PM, "Hndwvnds" <hndwvnds@ccrtc.com> wrote:

Hi Dawn,
I think there is a good diagram, or photo, of live weight in a book by M.
Straub (?). You mentioned linen weaving. The old reed "reeds" also flexed
when weaving linen----nice and easy on the fibers. The old weavers did
really know what they were doing and there was a whole industry of reed
makers for all the weavers. I have a couple of looms from the 1800's with
the raddles and reeds. I am setting them up fairly soon so I can work on
them. So many things I want to do since 'retirement'. cheers, Kathleen









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

"The selection of the terms we use today must be such that as many people
as possible can understand each other."
-Peter Collingwood

Check out the WeaveTech Store at www.cafepress.com/weavetech for t-shirts,
buttons, mousepads, mugs and other WT goodies!Yahoo! Groups Links






-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2012.0.2197 / Virus Database: 2437/5193 - Release Date: 08/11/12






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: linen weaves

Kathleen Stevens
 

I have an old Anders Levard with a wooden 'arm' that has a cord to be pulled which releases the rear gear to take off the tension of the back beam. I don't know how old this loom is so I'm guessing around 60 years or older. But in loom ages, 60 isn't all that old is it.

The older looms I have from the 1800's (American) use the system called 'shaft bore'. A long wooden rod is stuck into one of the holes that are spaced equally around the back beam on one end. The shaft (stick) generally has a cord to hold the end closest to the weaver in an up position to move the warp forward. Removing the shaft from the hole releases the warp and the weaver then winds forward with the front gear (often an old saw blade or in one of my looms, a metal strip bent into 'hills'). When the warp was sufficiently moved forward, the shaft bore was put into the next closest hole on the warp beam. It holds the tension quite well.

Dawn, have you seen any of these in England? cheers, Kathleen ps we travel fairly often to England (husband is from Surrey) and I have not seen the shaft bore there----perhaps I just haven't gone to the right places.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dawn McCarthy" <thebloominloom@yahoo.com>
To: <WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, August 11, 2012 6:29 PM
Subject: Re: [WeaveTech] linen weaves


I myself am quite familiar with live weight tension, I built my own as a second beam on my countermarch, I have also seen all different types in historical scenarios (I grew up in the textile mecca of Manchester England) and the National Trust does a good job of preserving past artifacts and equipment.

My question is did the Scandinavian countries favor the static or as I think of it "locked" tension as opposed to live weight, leading to the style of looms today such as Glimakra etc. Was it just a matter of whatever system was available?

I weave rugs and sometimes lace and wools on my Toika so I like the option of using the ratchet & pawl or the home made live weight tension. Ultimately it comes down to the weaver having control over the tension and quality of weaving, but I am curious if the loom design is particular to certain regions or countries.

Dawn


On Aug 11, 2012, at 2:59 PM, "Hndwvnds" <hndwvnds@ccrtc.com> wrote:

Hi Dawn,
I think there is a good diagram, or photo, of live weight in a book by M. Straub (?). You mentioned linen weaving. The old reed "reeds" also flexed when weaving linen----nice and easy on the fibers. The old weavers did really know what they were doing and there was a whole industry of reed makers for all the weavers. I have a couple of looms from the 1800's with the raddles and reeds. I am setting them up fairly soon so I can work on them. So many things I want to do since 'retirement'. cheers, Kathleen











------------------------------------

"The selection of the terms we use today must be such that as many people as possible can understand each other."
-Peter Collingwood

Check out the WeaveTech Store at www.cafepress.com/weavetech for t-shirts, buttons, mousepads, mugs and other WT goodies!Yahoo! Groups Links






-----
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2012.0.2197 / Virus Database: 2437/5193 - Release Date: 08/11/12


Re: Can you help?

Sharon Alderman <sharona@...>
 

Never mind. I just tried everything I could think of doing and figured
it out. In fact a lot of the questions here can be answered by the same
method, methinks!
Sharon


Re: linen weaves

Dawn McCarthy <thebloominloom@...>
 

I myself am quite familiar with live weight tension, I built my own as a second beam on my countermarch, I have also seen all different types in historical scenarios (I grew up in the textile mecca of Manchester England) and the National Trust does a good job of preserving past artifacts and equipment.

My question is did the Scandinavian countries favor the static or as I think of it "locked" tension as opposed to live weight, leading to the style of looms today such as Glimakra etc. Was it just a matter of whatever system was available?

I weave rugs and sometimes lace and wools on my Toika so I like the option of using the ratchet & pawl or the home made live weight tension. Ultimately it comes down to the weaver having control over the tension and quality of weaving, but I am curious if the loom design is particular to certain regions or countries.

Dawn


On Aug 11, 2012, at 2:59 PM, "Hndwvnds" <hndwvnds@ccrtc.com> wrote:

Hi Dawn,
I think there is a good diagram, or photo, of live weight in a book by M. Straub (?). You mentioned linen weaving. The old reed "reeds" also flexed when weaving linen----nice and easy on the fibers. The old weavers did really know what they were doing and there was a whole industry of reed makers for all the weavers. I have a couple of looms from the 1800's with the raddles and reeds. I am setting them up fairly soon so I can work on them. So many things I want to do since 'retirement'. cheers, Kathleen

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Live weight tension and linens

Kerstin Fröberg
 

There was, I think, a difference between "industry" and "household" weavers - even if "household" weaving was done for sale. (It might be called something else in correct English - )
According to Grenander-Nyberg (Lanthemmens vävstolar and/or Så vävde de), "home" (or "household"?) weavers usually had a ratchet and pawl system (see some examples on my blog, http://oddweavings.blogspot.se/2012/03/traditional-warp-tensioning-systems.html ). Myself, I have never seen live weight (or variants) in other than "industrial" situations. (Industrial in quotes 'cos (proto)industry can be happening "at home", too)

Kerstin in Sweden
http://bergdalaspinnhus.com

--- In WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com, Dawn McCarthy <thebloominloom@...> wrote:

Hmm, apparently I stand corrected on my assuming ratchet & pawl was used for heavy tension items & linen, received a delightful email with the following and thought I would share:

"However, in old times linen was woven with, guess what, a live-tension- type system. The slight 'bounce' actually is very good for weaving fine linen. Check out Luther Hooper on this, for one"

I am familiar with the "bounce" as I get it on my AVL which I also love! I also know that looms would often use a crude live weight system. Would the ratchet and pawl have been favorable for rugs or for a variety of uses? Which came first, live weight or locked tension? Was one method more favored in different parts of Europe than another?

I would be interested to hear opinions and info.

Dawn


linen weaves

Kathleen Stevens
 

Hi Dawn,
I think there is a good diagram, or photo, of live weight in a book by M. Straub (?). You mentioned linen weaving. The old reed "reeds" also flexed when weaving linen----nice and easy on the fibers. The old weavers did really know what they were doing and there was a whole industry of reed makers for all the weavers. I have a couple of looms from the 1800's with the raddles and reeds. I am setting them up fairly soon so I can work on them. So many things I want to do since 'retirement'. cheers, Kathleen


Re: Live weight tension and linens

Sara von Tresckow
 

The old looms I observed in Europe had a variety of tension systems, live weight among them. Ratchet and pawl was often only on one side of the loom - the cloth beam and often the warp beam was regulated by an axle with 4 holes in it and the weaver stuck a piece of wood through the hole and braced it on the frame, adjusting the fine tuning at the cloth beam. This bracing method is similar to the Cranbrook tensioning where there are coarse notches on the warp beam, evened out by a fine ratchet on the cloth beam, and similar to the Oaxacan looms I've seen.
The only things I ever found with the live weight that could be detriments were that it took a good 2" off the maximum weaving width and required a bit of fiddling at the beginning of a warp to get things moving at the right speed (finding the correct weight for that warp). On our trip a few years ago, any shop using live weight had a full collection of odd objects to be used as weights sitting around the back of the loom.
I've woven half a lifetime with ratchet and pawl and once used to the fine tuning prefer it - as with anything, there is a variety of tensioning methods out there and sometimes there is no clear "best", but the results depend a lot on the skill of the weaver and the weaver's assessment that the tension is correct for the desired fabric.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/xabck
Looms, Wisconsin Sheep & Wool Vendors


Live weight tension and linens

Dawn McCarthy <thebloominloom@...>
 

Hmm, apparently I stand corrected on my assuming ratchet & pawl was used for heavy tension items & linen, received a delightful email with the following and thought I would share:

"However, in old times linen was woven with, guess what, a live-tension- type system. The slight 'bounce' actually is very good for weaving fine linen. Check out Luther Hooper on this, for one"

I am familiar with the "bounce" as I get it on my AVL which I also love! I also know that looms would often use a crude live weight system. Would the ratchet and pawl have been favorable for rugs or for a variety of uses? Which came first, live weight or locked tension? Was one method more favored in different parts of Europe than another?

I would be interested to hear opinions and info.

Dawn


Re: weaving on the G! creaking

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

use Paraffin, NOT beeswax as a lube.

Quite true. Paraffin, candle wax or canning wax is a good way to
reduce friction, I use beeswax on wood screws only because it sticks
better on the steel threads and I also use beeswax on cords that rub
on something. I keep chunks of both waxes in my tool box.
To remove old wax use turpentine outside, because of the fumes.
Waxes are good for wooden objects, they won't drip onto the carpet or
hold moisture, they stay where they were used, don't stain the wood
and they fill the tiny cracks.

Talcum powder is good for reducing friction too. Soap is to be
avoided as it attracts and holds moisture,
it can promote rust or swell wood parts.



Bill & Gaye Koepp in California

"We work in the dark, we do what we can - we give what we have. Our
doubt is our passion and our passion is our task. The rest is the
madness of art."
- Henry James; The Middle Years


Re: Has anyone woven with Habu's uber-fine linen?

Janis Saunders
 

On 8/11/2012 8:59 AM, Jeane deCoster wrote:

Hi Tien,
Takako at Habu is a weaver by trade and prefers to weave very fine cloth
(in the 100 epi range). So, asking her directly about your intended use
of the yarn will yield you a very educated answer. The only suggestion
I'd make is to email her instead of calling as she's often on the road
and you really want an answer from her and not one of her staff.

By the way, if you have access to old Handwovens (80's or 90's?) there's
a very nice article from Takako about "weaving air" or some such thing.
I was house sitting for a friend with no cable tv and entertained myself
going through her old weaving magazines but can't (for the life of me)
remember which issue the article was in.

Jeane


Re: Has anyone woven with Habu's uber-fine linen?

Jeane deCoster
 

Hi Tien,
Takako at Habu is a weaver by trade and prefers to weave very fine cloth (in the 100 epi range). So, asking her directly about your intended use of the yarn will yield you a very educated answer. The only suggestion I'd make is to email her instead of calling as she's often on the road and you really want an answer from her and not one of her staff.

By the way, if you have access to old Handwovens (80's or 90's?) there's a very nice article from Takako about "weaving air" or some such thing. I was house sitting for a friend with no cable tv and entertained myself going through her old weaving magazines but can't (for the life of me) remember which issue the article was in.

Jeane


Re: weaving on the G! creaking

Kati Meek
 

Though I've said it before, I'll say it again - use Paraffin, NOT beeswax as a lube. Beeswax is somewhat sticky- perfect for drive bands, but not for reducing friction. Paraffin on the wood-to-wood bearings of warp and cloth beams is also a good idea - much easier to do while assembling the loom than after. Kati

Treadle with Joy,

Kati Reeder Meek
Treehouse Handweaving Studio
Reflections from A Flaxen Past: For Love of Lithuanian Weaving, Warp with a Trapeze and Dance with your Loom
http://katimeek.blogspot.com


Re: Books in the mail

Debbie Kaplan
 

I would like to second Marg's endorsement of Ann Richard's book. It contains all kinds of detail on over twist yarns and how to play off different yarns against each other and why different weave structures, sett and beat work. The photos from a variety of weavers are lovely, engaging and inspiring. It is in no way a recipe book, but provides plenty of detail for experimentation.

Lucky you, Marg, to have textiles by both Junichi Arai and Richards!

Debbie in MA

--- In WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com, Marg Coe <margcoe@...> wrote:

With some disappointments being recently reported regarding publications
received in the mail, I'm attempting to reverse the trend.

Yesterday along came "Weaving Textiles That Shape Themselves," by Ann
Richards. What a treat! The photographs are stunning! I am very
fortunate to own weavings by Junichi Arai and by Ann, none are exactly
duplicated in the book, but a couple are might similar. ns.

Marg


Re: Sewing with handwoven cloth

Sara von Tresckow
 

As has been previously stated, handwoven fabric that resembles commercial in hand and stability will sew up the same way.
For jackets with set in sleeves, lining the garment, as would be recommended for any fine tailored garment, is the best way.
I keep bolts of black and white silk charmeuse from Dharma on hand for this purpose. If white or black is not appropriate, I piece dye the white to coordinate with the outer fabric.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/xabck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs


Sewing with handwoven cloth

Cyndi the Weaver
 

What I want to know is how to handle the tailored / semi-tailored underarm seams if there is a sleeve (two seams crossing). What edge finishing to use? Top stitching? Serging - what kind? Binding? What are your opinions.

Cyndi Bolt
Rainbow Weaving in WV


Re: Sewing with handwoven cloth

Eve Alexander
 

Hi Shari,

I just wish you could have seen the beautifully tailored garments in the National Exhibition here is UK last month. Absolutely nothing boxy about them!

It was set up and hung in a lovely building in Sussex by a group of The Association of Guilds of Weavers, Spinners & Dyers and was a real treat.

Good luck with finding patterns that will suit you.

Eve


Re: Swinging Treadles on Glimaka

Dawn McCarthy <thebloominloom@...>
 

Re: treadle gates, I tried them when I first got my Varpa (cm) and my Toika (cm) the gate spreads the treadles but creates an angle from the lam tie ups and I found it was not a comfortable movement. With a little practice I now tip toe my way across the treadles. Some people use a "braille" type marker of rubber bands to mark certain treadles so you can feel where you are in the treadling. Also, wear thicker socks so you can feel where you are but it protects your feet and ankles from those hard knocks in the beginning.

I have a 63 inch Glimakra, I skootch to the end of my bench and use the wooden arm lever to release the warp. I also have a production AVL with auto everything, I enjoy the difference in the two looms. The Glimakra is a joy to weave on even though nothing is "automated". Regarding the live weight tension, most of these traditional type looms were used for linens or fabrics requiring heavy tension which is guaranteed with the ratchet and pawl system. Maybe what you are wanting is more of a production type loom? I hope you get to be good friends with the cm loom, I would never be without mine!

Dawn


Swinging Treadles on Glimaka

Sylvia Glenister
 

Holly,

You might find a 'treadle gate' helpful.Just a piece of timber the full width of the loom with longish dowels which fit up between the tredlles.

Sylvia


Re: Can you help?

Sara von Tresckow
 

Export the file as a *.png graphic file. You have some choices in a dialog box if you wish to save only the fabric or the entire draft or just certain aspects of the draft.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@woolgatherers.com

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/xabck
Looms, visit us in Fond du Lac or contact us about your weaving/spinning needs

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