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Re: guilds & the internet

Susan Rubendall
 

Deanna wrote:
<We also recently started sending out our newsletter to the google
group as a pdf file (with hardcopies mailed to the very few people who
don't have email access.)>

Our spinners' guild e-mails a link to our pdf newsletter; our weavers'
guild sends the pdf as an attachment. My husband and I publish
newsletters for two nonprofits. They save a lot of money because we
have encouraged (harassed?) members into accepting electronic
newsletters.

If given the option, I would always choose a pdf over a piece of
paper, but not everyone can make that choice or wants too.

Susan


Re: managing supplemental warps

Su Butler
 

HI Holly........Why not tie a weavers knot?? They usually go through the heddles pretty easily......

Su Butler :-) www.subudesigns.com
UNDERSTANDING RAYON CHENILLE IS AVAILABLE now!! See my website for details!


Re: guilds & the internet

Sue Bye
 

The Weavers Guild of Minnesota has an extensive web site, http://www.weaversguildmn.org/ and has a presence on Weavolution, Ravelry, and facebook. Our office manager keeps us current.

This past summer we started distributing our monthly newsletter via email because of the changes in bulk mail regulations and rising cost of postage. Members can still receive a printed newsletter, but they pay $20.00 extra a year to cover the cost.


Russian Join

Janet Stollnitz
 

The Russian join takes a little more time than tieing knots, but
there is almost no waste and the yarns should go through the heddles and reed.

The Russian join is nicely illustrated at
http://www.knittinganyway.com/freethings/russianjoin.htm

Janet

Janet Stollnitz
Silver Spring Looms
Dyed Dreams
jstollnitz@comcast.net


Re: managing supplemental warps

Darlene Wainwright <darlene_w@...>
 

I would be tempted to use a Russian join. It is not bulky and will go
through the heddles. The density of the yarn is a bit more just at the join
but it is strong and saves waste. After doing a few you get pretty fast at
them. While they may take a bit longer to do than other joining methods,
once done they can be forgotten and you just keep weaving with zero waste.

I'm pretty sure there are a number of instructions for a Russian join on the
web. My only change to the 'standard' is to break rather than cut the
joining ends as it gives a more tapered change in density and helps it to
diminish the bulk of the join.


Darlene Wainwright
darlene_w@xplornet.com

-----Original Message-----
From: WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Holly Shaltz
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2009 7:56 AM
To: WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [WeaveTech] managing supplemental warps

Cynthia writes:

<<My suggestion would be to tie the knot and ease it through heddles and
reed and then pin it to the already woven web.>>

These are two worsted-weight knitting yarns. When tied together, the knot
won't go through the heddles, eased or otherwise.

I'm also trying to avoid waste. By tieing the yarns together in some way, I
can weave almost to the ends of one batch, then at the end of one piece, I
can pull the new ends through and pin them in place.

Holly


------------------------------------

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possible can understand each other."
-Peter Collingwood

Check out the WeaveTech Store at www.cafepress.com/weavetech for t-shirts,
buttons, mousepads, mugs and other WT goodies!Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: managing supplemental warps

E. de Ruiter <eruiter@...>
 

Recently - a few weeks or already longer ago? - there was a message about "Russian Joins", kind of sewing the old and the new end together. Maybe that is an idea which does not give you loss of ground warp yarn using the overhand knots?

Erica de Ruiter,
't Grind 44,
6581HG, Malden, The Netherlands



But I'm having trouble efficiently managing the
addition of new warps. An overhand knot to join a
new color onto the old, for example, won't go
through the heddles.


Re: managing supplemental warps

Holly Shaltz <holly@...>
 

Cynthia writes:

<<My suggestion would be to tie the knot and ease it through heddles and
reed and then pin it to the already woven web.>>

These are two worsted-weight knitting yarns. When tied together, the knot won't go through the heddles, eased or otherwise.

I'm also trying to avoid waste. By tieing the yarns together in some way, I can weave almost to the ends of one batch, then at the end of one piece, I can pull the new ends through and pin them in place.

Holly


Re: managing supplemental warps

Cynce Williams
 

The knot won't go through the heddles or the reed?

My suggestion would be to tie the knot and ease it through heddles and
reed and then pin it to the already woven web.

HTH

Cynthia

On Nov 12, 2009, at 9:13 AM, Holly Shaltz wrote:

But I'm having trouble efficiently managing the
addition of new warps. An overhand knot to join a
new color onto the old, for example, won't go
through the heddles. I'm not real keen about
tieing a 'bridging' string from one s.warp and the
next - there's only 27 ends involved, but the time
to tie two knots per end is daunting, and this is
for a commission so I'd like to keep the time down.


managing supplemental warps

Holly Shaltz <holly@...>
 

I have on a warp for a commission that involves 10/2 perle plain weave ground and a novelty knitting yarn, 12 wpi, as a supplemental warp and weft interweaving on top with occasional tiedowns. Total warp, 15.5 yards.

The idea is to change the supplementals to make 26 pieces, each a little different. So that means changing the color of the s. warp from time to time, as well as changing the colors of both wefts with every piece.

I have weights on the s.warp ends down pat - a diabetes test strip vial with a nut (hardware, not edible :) in it makes a perfect, easy-to-move weight for each end.

But I'm having trouble efficiently managing the addition of new warps. An overhand knot to join a new color onto the old, for example, won't go through the heddles. I'm not real keen about tieing a 'bridging' string from one s.warp and the next - there's only 27 ends involved, but the time to tie two knots per end is daunting, and this is for a commission so I'd like to keep the time down.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Holly


What's a Weavolution?

ClaudiaS <claudiajane@...>
 

Check out the article in Complex Weavers Journal for October 2009, page
22.
This is my first article publish in "weaving".

Claudia Segal


Re: guilds & the internet

Josephine R L Earl <WeaverJo@...>
 

Complex Weavers has a large website
http://www.complex-weavers.org/index.htm which includes information
about our Seminars, study groups, CW awards, color pictures from journal
articles, and more.

On 11/11/2009 10:02 AM, Louise Koslofsky wrote:
Would like to hear how various guilds are using the internet?
--


Regards,

Jo/Josephine Earl/JoOwl

Website Chair http://www.complex-weavers.org/
<http://www.complex-weavers.org/index.htm>


Re: guilds & the internet

Josephine R L Earl <WeaverJo@...>
 

Our guild has a website, http://wncfhg.org/ at which we post our newsletters in pdf format, information about the Blue Ridge Fiber Show (which we sponsor), information about meetings (including maps and directions), workshops, our study groups, and a list of the officers. In addition, we have links to other guild websites, our library listing, and several pages of utilities, including a reed substitution chart and a warp and weft calculation worksheet.

On 11/11/2009 10:02 AM, Louise Koslofsky wrote:
Would like to hear how various guilds are using the internet?
--

Regards,

Josephine R L Earl

Western North Carolina Fibers/Handweavers Guild
http://www.wncfhg.org/


Re: Guilds and the Internet

RBlau <ruthblau@...>
 

I would be interested in hearing other people’s views on how open
individual Guild's Yahoo Groups should be.
We have a Yahoo e-list for our guild, and it's
open only to guild members. I doubt that this policy will change.

Ruth

www.blueloomdesigns.com


Guilds and the Internet

Maurice Blackburn
 

The Piedmont Fiber Guild has a Website www.piedmontfiberguild.org . This website is fully available to anyone
who wishes to log on to it. There are
no restricted “Members Only” sections. It basically gives information about the Guild and includes news on
upcoming events both for the Guild and for craft related activities in the
general area. We post the Guild’s
newsletter on the Website in addition to sending it to the members. Where the newsletter contains personal
information – addresses, phone numbers etc, we remove this before posting it.

There are links on the Website to both the Guild and the
Webmaster, but in fact both links come to me as Webmaster. I answer general questions about the guild myself. If it is appropriate, I will pass the
questions and/or comments on to Board members.

We also have a Yahoo Group – pfguild@yahoogroups.com. This is presently available only to Guild
members and is used to pass information and ideas, back and forth between
members. We have debated whether we
should open this chat site to people who are not Guild members - still requiring moderator approval
however. We have not made this change
yet as the Yahoo Groups is often used to give instruction on how to get to
peoples houses for our monthly Handwork meetings. I would be interested in hearing other people’s views on how open
individual Guild's Yahoo Groups should be.


Maurice Blackburn

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: guilds & the internet

Sara von Tresckow <sarav@...>
 

I belong to more than one group that put out PDF newsletters. It is quite nice - you can store them in a directory for future reference and print out just the page or two you may need to hang on the calendar or refrigerator for dates and times.

Sara von Tresckow, Fond du Lac, WI
sarav@powercom.net

http://www.woolgatherers.com Dutch Master Loom/Spinning Chairs/xabck
Looms, vendors at Wisconsin Spin In


Re: guilds & the internet

RBlau <ruthblau@...>
 

Our guild has a website:

http://www.potomaccraftsmenguild.org/

(Note: we have changed our name to Potomac Fiber Arts Guild, but the old name is still the website URL.)

Here's a list of what we have on the website:

Monthly meetings
mini-workshops & workshops
info about our Yahoo e-list (open to all members)
our full library catalog
our newsletter
a list of the equipment we have available for rent
info about our biennial grant program
and more

Last year, the newsletter was both on the website and mailed. I think this year, you can opt out of the mailed version and simply read it online. I'm so much in favor of this: it saves the guild money for printing & mailing, and it enviro friendly.

Ruth

www.blueloomdesigns.com


guilds

Betsy Tabac <btabac@...>
 

Our guild has a web site but the best Internet use is the Yahoogroup.com
site. Except for in-person communications, we communicate among guild
members exclusively through this site. No paper newsletter, no paper copies
of minutes clogging up US mail, etc.

Any member may post a notice to the group. At the end of each posting is a
reply option where you can respond to the individual or to the group. The
Yahoogroup is very user-friendly. The only drawback is that as responses to
each posting occur, they are shown along with the new posts on that same
topic.

We called every member of the guild who was not using the Yahoogroup site to
make sure she/he could access it if desired. Those members having trouble
were contacted by the web mistress who talked them through getting onto the
site. We also now have written instructions for getting onto the site and
any guild member may request a copy. If we get a member who does not use
computers, we are prepared to take extra steps to include him/her but
fortunately we have not needed to do that.

We also store files at the site such as directions to meeting places,
business and program meeting minutes, etc. Some of these web-based
activities could have occurred at the web site but use of the Internet in
our guild evolved as described because of knowledge/time constraints faced
by our volunteers.

The Yahoogroup is a fabulous tool. I cannot imagine having to use the phone
or mail to do the things we can now do on the Internet. Right now we are
finalizing details for guild participation in a weaving festival on Saturday
and eight participants are saying to each other simultaneously what she/he
will bring, how we will handle lunch, who can car-pool and all other details
for such an event.

Betsy


Re: guilds & the internet

Doreen McLaughlin
 

The Pikes Peak Weavers Guild http://pikespeakweavers.org web
site has links to the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum Coverlet collection,
back issues of the PPWG newsletter, information on workshops and monthly
programs, the WeaveDesign program created by Bengt Nelson, and journal
articles by members. We have a web master who is a member of the guild, and
each of the officers can have an e-mail box through the guild web site. The
front range is blessed with 5 weaving guilds: Pueblo, PPWG (Colorado Springs
area), Rocky Mountain (Denver), Boulder, and Northern Colorado (Fort Collins
area). Although we exchange printed newsletters, many members of other
guilds like to check on line for information on programs sponsored by sister
guilds. Newcomers and visitors to the area can also find out about our guild
and are welcome to attend our meetings.

Guild members should occasionally check the web site and report
any problems to the web master. In our case, as soon as I post this I'm
going to be letting our web master know that the map to our meeting site
needs to be changed, and the information on our September workshop needs to
be taken down and data on our upcoming spring spinning workshop with Celia
Quinn needs to be put up.



Doreen

PPWG newsletter editor


Re: guilds & the internet

Deanna Johnson <djmacj@...>
 

Would like to hear how various guilds are using the internet?

Our guild has a web site, plus a google group which is used to send out announcements. (Only board members can post to the group, so it's not used for general discussions, and members don't have to worry about being inundated with emails.) We also recently started sending out our newsletter to the google group as a pdf file (with hardcopies mailed to the very few people who don't have email access.)

Deanna


guilds & the internet

Louise K
 

Would like to hear how various guilds are using the internet?
We have a website (triangleweavers.org) and get a lot of inquiries from it.
Our president currently responds to those, but we were wondering how other guilds are using the internet?
Louise

If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went. Will Rogers
You don't throw a whole life away just 'cause it's banged up a little." SeaBiscuit, 2003