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Re: countermarche

from Agnes Hauptli <ahauptli@...>
 

"marche" is the french word for walking, working is "travailler"
The phrase " ca ne marche pas" is a saying that cannot be translated
literally like so many of the "saying".
Agnes


Re: Cordage

joannecaldwell@...
 

You can purchase shrink wrap tubing at Auto Supply stores also...Joanne
Caldwell
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Re: cordage

Murphy, Alice <amurphy@...>
 

You would not splice to fix the ends, did you mean "whipping" the ends. If you have nylon can just use a match to fuse the ends.
Alice

"Weavers get warped, Spinners get a twist, Dulcimer players fret but Librarians get booked!"


Re: French off topic

Murphy, Alice <amurphy@...>
 

Wickedly, one last word, there are major differences too between quebec french and the parisian french we get in school.
I know time to go weave! Just could not resist. Will now go look at warps.
Alice

"Weavers get warped, Spinners get a twist, Dulcimer players fret but Librarians get booked!"


Re: Heat -shrinking caps for cordage

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

Can one readily buy clear caps? I'm thinking of
weaving some custom cardwoven shoe laces, but never
knew how to cap them. If I could get some caps at the
hardware store how would I go about heat shrinking
them safely at home?
Heat shrink tubing is sold in electronic stores, Radio Shack has it. It does
come in clear and the primary colors in several diameters. Usually it's in a
package of assorted sizes, so some may not be applicable to your project. A
larger electronics outlet will sell it in selected colors or sizes as long
as 2 foot. It cuts with scissors. It can be shrunk with a heat gun, a
strong hair dryer or caressing it with a hot soldering iron tip; wear eye
protection always ! Once shrunk, it is on permanently. It takes a bit of
practice to make the tubing behave but after a few melted pieces I got along
with it fine for electronic wiring stuff. NOTE : I've never tried it on
cotton, wool or poly strands, so I can't really recommend it for that.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: French off topic

Marge Coe <MargeCoe@...>
 

"marche" is the verb meaning
"work." i clearly recall "il ne marche pas" as "it doesnt work!"
This discussion is quickly veering off topic, and someone who knows French
could jump in . . . meanwhile we do have a solution at our literal
fingertips:

http://dictionaries.travlang.com/FrenchEnglish
http://humanities.uchicago.edu/forms_unrest/FR-ENG.html

both tells us that:

marche (noun no accent) = step, stair, rung.
marche (noun accent on e) = bazaar, fair, market
marcher (verb no accent) = march, walk

It would seem that there's some confusion between idiomatic usage and
dictionary definitions. "Putting this subject to bed" certainly doesn't
translate well if you do it word-by-word!

Marge
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Margaret Coe
MargeCoe@att.net
Tucson, AZ USA
-------------------------------------------------------------------


Re: countermarche

Murphy, Alice <amurphy@...>
 

French for work is travaille!
Alice

"Weavers get warped, Spinners get a twist, Dulcimer players fret but Librarians get booked!"


Re: countermarche

Linda <flschultz@...>
 

if i remember my high school french correctly, "marche" is the verb meaning
"work."
Marche is walk in french.

Linda
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada


weaving in Tallahassee

Sue Mansfield <mansfield.susan@...>
 

I'd appreciate information on weaving in Tallahassee, meetings, weavers,
and things to see.

Sue
mansfield.susan@usa.net


Re: countermarche

Jane Plante <jcplante3@...>
 

As long as we are discussing the meaning of words - where did "thrums"
come from and what does it mean? A basket maker friend asked for some
leftover yarns and when I told her I saved lots of my thrums, she asked
me what it meant, and, I had no answer.
Thanks,
Jane


Re: Cordage

jyang949 <jyang949@...>
 

Now with the invention of heat shrink tubes for electrical
wiring applications you can make the same ends as on your shoe laces.
Walt, do they make these tubes in clear plastic? I went to a large hardware store but they only had stick-out-like-a-sore-thumb colors, and they were the wrong size anyway.

Trivia: Those tips on shoe laces are called aglets, from the Middle French word for needle, which in turn derives from the Latin word for acute.

Janet


Re: cordage

jyang949 <jyang949@...>
 

I found that when fixing the [loom cord] tie-up of 8 shafts to, say, 10 treadles, I could do it almost all by feel. Whereas the Texsolv system does need my eyes.
That's one of the reasons I am gradually replacing my Texsolv tie-ups. Another is that my fingertips get sore from threading and securing Texsolv. Finally, snitch knots are faster and easier to adjust.

How do you keep the ends of loom cord from raveling? (Or is it "unraveling"?) I found instructions for splicing cord, and after two tries have decided that splicing is too time-consuming!

Somebody contacted me off-list to say that braided rope will stretch more than twisted rope. Of course...It brought to mind those braided "finger lock" toys.

Janet


Signe's temple stretcher

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I have a Signe Temple, still in the bag, never used. I'll trade it for an
old handshuttle ( not a flying shuttle or rag shuttle ). It has no
instructions but it's two steel cylindrical support brackets, two wooden
dowels with grooves and two hook devices with original cords. It is supposed
to be attached to the sides of a loom; the dowels hold the cords in line
with the fell. The hook devices hold onto the fell.
Contact offlist if wanting to trade. Not for sale.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: countermarche

Sande Francis <sandeleh@...>
 

if i remember my high school french correctly, "marche" is the verb meaning
"work." i clearly recall "il ne marche pas" as "it doesnt work!" :) long
and short "works?" anyone speak or read enough french to look at early
french weaving texts?

Sande Francis
Fresno, CA, USA
come see my socks, spinning, and other stuff at:
http://photos.yahoo.com/bigknitter

Looking up early weave books, it is obvious that what we call lams were
always called marches.
In John Duncan's 'Practical and Descriptive Essays on the Art of
Weaving', Glasgow, 1808, they are described as long and short marches.
(the lower long marche which raises shaft, the upper short marche which
lowers it).


countermarche

peter collingwood <peter@...>
 

Looking up early weave books, it is obvious that what we call lams were
always called marches.
In John Duncan's 'Practical and Descriptive Essays on the Art of
Weaving', Glasgow, 1808, they are described as long and short marches.
(the lower long marche which raises shaft, the upper short marche which
lowers it).
In Alfred Barlow's 'History and Principles of Weaving', London, 1878,
they are described as long marches and 'short or countermarches'. I
would imagine that maybe because the earlier looms only raised shafts,
the new added marches which lowered them as well, and so acted 'counter'
to them, were called countermarches.

Lam is in OED with the meaning we use; but countermarch is only given as
a military term (maybe similar to the use of strategic withdrawal for a
defeat!)
Lamms occur in Duncan but associated with gauze weaving, and seem to be
a type of doup.

Has Ralph Griswold put Duncan and Barlow on line? They are wonderful
sources.
peter collingwood,

http://www.petercollingwood.co.uk


Re: Cordage

Murphy, Alice <amurphy@...>
 

I've used nylon braided sash cord, about 1/8 inch thickness when I replaced a bunch of cotton cords, and they are still working well after several years.
Alice in MO

"Weavers get warped, Spinners get a twist, Dulcimer players fret but Librarians get booked!"


Re: cordage

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

How do you keep the ends of loom cord from raveling?
With cotton cord I dab the ends with white glue; if the knot is to be
permanent it gets a dab too. For poly cords I use a flame to fuse the cord
end. Whipping the ends ( old technology here ) works fine if you have the
time. I whip a cotton cord if it's made into a loop at the end and put it
over a metal grommet to eliminate abrasion, on brake ropes.
Elasticity of braided vs twisted or plied cords probably depends upon the
material in the cords, but rock climbers use braided ropes because they're
strong and stretch to absorb the shock in a fall.
A tie-up cord would not stretch that much, as it's relativly short. On long
runs ( 8 feet on our large loom ) I use stainless steel wire cable, it's
sold in rolls, for deep sea fishing leaders, there's no stretching these.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: End feed shuttles

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

The tensioning is a number of hooks.
Works well for yarn that is not too slippery or fine.
I have found w/ the BB shuttles that if the yarn is slippery or fine, I can run it around all the hooks and then back across one or two. I have yet to find a yarn that the BB can't handle. I just wish they would make a shuttle that fits in the AVL fly shuttle box. I once wrote to them & asked if they would do so. I said I would be happy to send the exact measurements, but they (understandably) said they would not make such a shuttle without an AVL loom to refine it on. And they don't have an AVL loom. Too bad.

Ruth


Re: End feed shuttles -Digest Number 209

Melby, E.
 

Which endfeed/delivery shuttle will work the best for you, depends on the
yarn you are likely to use and the width you weave. The Bluster Bays come in
several weights depending on the wood used. So, if you weave wide goods,
that is a strong point in their favour. The tensioning is a number of hooks.
Works well for yarn that is not too slippery or fine. The Crossleys are
lighter in weight - at least the most common type. I have heard rumours
about one with a brass tension which might be heavier, but I have not seen
that one. The Crossleys offer a continouse tensioning range and the yarn
gets fewer possebilities for snarling around hooks and such. I use Crossleys
at the moment with some rayon with a will of it's own, 25" wide warp. For a
wide warp and say cotton weft, I'd use my largest Bluster Bay.
I'm very happy user of both types.
BTW a good electric winder makes winding a lot easier - better filling and
less strain on you. With these shuttles that is important, it is a nuisance
if you have to untangle poor winding. If you look for a winder, find one
that supports both ends.

Elisabeth

A Norwegian in the Netherlands with a fledgling studio gobling up all her
income. I have a lot of fun though.


Re: Thrums....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

where did "thrums"
come from and what does it mean?
From an Icelandic word: thromr ( umlat over the o ), meaning edge.

Other translations are:
Ger.: Troddel
Port.: desperdicios de teia
Fr.: dechets de chaine
Sw.: afsingar ( umlat over the a )

Refer. -
Encyclopaedia Of Hand-weaving, by S.A.Zielinski, 1959
Warp & Weft, by Dorothy K. Burnham, 1980,1982

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California