Date   

Re: Teasel for brushing

Laura Fry <laurafry@...>
 

Part of the problem with teasels, is that they are plant
matter. If they get old and dried out before you have a
chance to use them, they will disintegrate. :(

They are amazingly effective when they are in good condition, tho.

Laura Fry
who mostly uses a dog brush
http://laurafry.com


Re: Teasel for brushing

Laura Fry <laurafry@...>
 

Ihana uses teasels..... :)

Laura Fry
http://laurafry.com


Re: Teasel for fulling

Joan Swift <joanes@...>
 

The teasels used for fulling are a special variety, not available in the
U.S., I believe, unless some are being specially planted. These
teasels have a long hook or barb on the end. Ihana uses them on her
machine.

I bought a hand tool made for them, a wooden frame with 2 rows of teasels
mounted inside. The teasels fell apart before I was able to finish with
one throw. It could have been my technique?

Ihana does a tremendous job, however; I've had several throws done by her
and was very satisfied. It was well worth it - the time and energy spent
in hand brushing to make an equal amount of fluff would have been very
great. A cheap, hard plastic hair brush, however, works better for hand
brushing than teasels, imho.

Joan, in rainy Oregon, where the other kind of teasel grows wild in
abundance


Re: Teasel for fulling

Laura Fry <laurafry@...>
 

Teasel Gigs and Teasels:

SEW Inc.
P. O. Box 69007
Portland, OR
USA 1-503-246-8528


Alison sells both gigs and teasels.

Cheers,

Laura Fry
http://laurafry.com


Re: Weighted warp beam

jyang949 <jyang949@...>
 

Peggy Osterkamp said that if the beam is faceted instead of round, it has to have at least six facets for the weighting system to work. So, I removed the rust from some long-unused exercise weights, used sash cord to suspend them from the warp beam, and used a spring as a counterweight. No idea how much weight to use, so I started with three pounds, then six, and finally settled on ten pounds. It worked!

It worked--but wasn't suited for weaving the header at the beginning. The brakes needs to be on for that section so the beater can apply more force.

Some AVL looms use an arm with a sliding weight. It looks a lot more convenient for finding the right tension.

I haven't been able to even out the tension of the individual warp threads; some are still slack, even after weaving the heading. Am strongly tempted to go back to my original practice of warping back to front, as it seems to provide more even tension.

Janet


New info about Woolee Winder

Philip Costa <philcosta@...>
 

From Philip Costa loom-owner@yahoogroups.com
& List member of Weavetech list
I just received an email from Nathan Lee today:

"The WooLee Winders have not been available sense the passing of my
father Robert on 11/29/00. I am however now making these products
again through the company Designs by Robert Lee & Son. Please visit
my web site at www.thewooleewinder.com/ "


Re: Teasel for fulling

archfarm@...
 

Teasel is a rather archaic tool. Surely there is something more
suitable available. How about a Velcro of coarse proportion? What does
Ihana use? What does (forbidden word) "the industry" use?

Myra


On M. C. Escher

Walter Turpening <walt.turpening@...>
 

To get shades of gray in a woodcut (which is used to make a B&W print)
you increase or decrease the number of cuts per sq. inch which controls
the 'density' of lines on the corresponding print. For weaving I would
just use shading of color. I can see using Summer and Winter or double
weave pick-up or some tapestry techniques.

Walt T.


Re: Teasel for fulling

Carl Cole <cncole@...>
 

Janet,
Since you mentioned that you were unsure seeds whether teasel can be brought
into California, I am guessing that you live in this state. Teasel is a very
common weed here in the S.F. bay and North Bay area. Shouldn't be too
difficult to persuade someone from this area to hunt some down for you.
There is a carder among the items at the General Vallejo adobe near
Petaluma. It is a rough wooden frame with a handle into which several rows
of teasel heads are clamped. Several years ago, when I had woven my wife a
cotarina using handspun alpaca for weft, I used a dried teasel head still on
its stalk to raise quite a respectable fuzzy finish.

I think I saw some along Highway 12 between Santa Rosa and Sebastopol. This
should be a good time of year to gather the dried heads. Good luck in your
quest.
Carl


WOOLEE WINDER- NEW INFORMAION

Philip Costa <philcosta@...>
 

From Philip Costa loom-owner@yahoogroups.com
I just received an email from Nathan Lee today:

"The WooLee Winders have not been available sense the passing of my
father Robert on 11/29/00. I am however now making these products
again through the company Designs by Robert Lee & Son. Please visit
my web site at www.thewooleewinder.com/ "


Re: Teasel for fulling

Margaret Thorson <thousandflower@...>
 

I have found teasels growing in vacant lots in western Washington. You
might try someone on the noxious weed board and offer to pull up any you
find.

Margaret in the San Juan Islands

----------

From: "jyang949" <jyang949@home.com>
To: WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [WeaveTech] Teasel for fulling
Date: Sun, Jan 20, 2002, 3:42 PM
I would like to make a teasel gig for brushing handwoven fabric. Does
anybody know where I can find fuller's teasel? Its botanical names are
Dipsacus sativus or Dipsacus fullonum. (Common teasel--D. sylvestris--is no
good for fulling fabric.)


Teasel for fulling

jyang949 <jyang949@...>
 

I would like to make a teasel gig for brushing handwoven fabric. Does anybody know where I can find fuller's teasel? Its botanical names are Dipsacus sativus or Dipsacus fullonum. (Common teasel--D. sylvestris--is no good for fulling fabric.)

A company in Canada sells the seed, but it's a biennial so it won't be ready to harvest until 2003. I'd rather buy the dried heads. Besides, I don't yet know if this *very* invasive plant can be sent into California.

Janet

"If you've ever lost a loved one to kudzu--you might be a redneck."


Re: Saganishki weaving; Tessellation

jyang949 <jyang949@...>
 

Yesterday (January 19) two people contacted me off-list about saganishiki and tessellation, but I accidentally deleted it and most of the E-mail <<argggh>>. If you wrote to me and I have not responded, please re-send!

Thanks,
Janet


Re: Nordic Studio?

Janet Yang <jyang949@...>
 

My current project is 70 epi doubleweave.
Nadine,

Nordic Studio has a website at http://www.cyberus.ca/~nordicstudio

Please tell us more about your doubleweave project. What dentage of reed are you
using?

Janet


Re: Nordic Studio?

janee233
 

--- In WeaveTech@y..., "Nadine & John Purcell" <Purcell@c...>
wrote:
Nordic Studio, located in Canada.
The contact information I have for them is:

Nordic Studio
June Hanson
R.R. 2
Lunenberg, Ontario
K0C 1R0

phone 613-346-2373
fax 613-346-0103

nordicstudio@cnwl.igs.net


Nordic Studio?

Nadine & John Purcell <Purcell@...>
 

Two or three years ago I bought some Bockens Bomullsmattvarp size
12/6 at an ANWG Conference. I think I bought it from a company named
Nordic Studio, located in Canada.
Cannot find a current address for them, and no ads in recent
magazines. Does anyone know if they are still in business? OR does
anyone know a North American source for this rug warp?
Thanks in advance - you may reply off list to - purcell@cdsnet.net.
-Nadine in snowy Ashland, Oregon
p.s. - For those who know me, NO, I am not about to weave a rug...the
question is for a friend. My current project is 70 epi doubleweave.


Re: Weighted warp beam

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

Peggy Osterkamp said that if the beam is faceted instead of round, it has
to have at least six facets for the weighting system to work.
True and an octagon is better; the closer to a larger diameter round shape
the better, in my opinion.
A sketch of the system is shown in "Handloom Weaving", by Luther Hooper and
"Encyclopaedia Of Hand-weaving", by S.A.Zielinski .

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: jacquard book

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

Bill wrote:

Hmmmm...I have a book: " Jacquard Mechanism and Harness Mounting " by Fred
Bradbury, 1912, hardback, 355 pages, no ISBN number.
If that's no longer under copyright, it might be something Ralph would be willing to put on his website. He borrows your book, scans it, and returns it to you. Ralph is no longer on WeaveTech, but you can contact him at <ralph@cs.arizona.edu> to ask if he's interested.

Ruth


A doubleweave question

sfsaulson@...
 

When weaving double-width doubleweave, is there an easy way to do on-loom
hem-stitching across the entire width of the cloth, including that which is
being woven as the bottom layer?
Thanks,
Sarah Saulson


Introduction

Marian Stubenitsky <stubenitsky@...>
 

Hello,

I'm Marian Stubenitsky from Holland. I'm a handweaver for over 34 years
and a teacher for 27 years. I like weaving most for the research, the
designing, the colors, the excitement when it becomes what I expected!
I've got a lot of looms, for teaching. I liked the countermarch my
father built for me best. Today, I prefer easier-to-tie looms, like
LeClerc (Nilus, 16 shafts) and my sweet little Magic Dobby (Louet,
Holland, 24 shafts). I do most of the designing with the computer. I use
a programme a dutch man made for his weaving mother, it's called Winweef
(=Winweave).
Now I'm preparing a lecture I was asked to give in april. The subject
is: 'Gewaagd, gelaagd', which means as much as hazardous or risky
stratified, in layers. Of course I'll make layers in double
(triple)-weave, pleats.... Various materials, settings, structures. For
the moment I'm a bit anxious....I'm short of heddles....there is not
much time and I've got so many ideas!!!
If there are ideas in this group, I'd like to hear them!

Marian.