Date   

Subject: Re: Back apron bar

KarenInTheWoods <pfundt@...>
 

I have a CM loom, I warp front to back, and I continue to have problems
tying on to the back apron bar.
I know there are many methods of tying on, and this is my favorite.

I position the back bar about halfway between the back beam and the heddles.
I take each bout of warp threads...... stroke and strum them till all
evenly tensioned, pull over back bar, split in half underneath and bring
each half up around from the sides. Tie in a *criss cross under* motion
like tying the first part of a shoe. Right over the top of the bout.

Then after I get all the bouts tied, I go back and forth tightening eash set
of ends them all across the warp, untill all are evenly tensioned, patting
the warp to check repeatedly for evenness. Then I give each bout another
*criss cross under* again and pull tight.

I have never had a warp slip yet. When cutting off the finished project,
these ends just fall off from the back side when the cut ends are slipped
through the knot. A little *wiggle* and they fall off.


Weavingly Yours,
KarenInTheWoods
(try these links for weaving and family pics)
http://www.KarenInTheWoods.eboard.com
http://KarenInTheWoods.eboard.com


Re: Back apron bar

Janet Yang <jyang949@...>
 

When you tie onto the back rod, there are knots/lumps on the beam.
Do these interfere with the uniformity of the warp tension?

Janet
The Weaver Formerly Known as jyang1@home.com


Back apron bar

WC3424@...
 

When winding the warp, crochet a yarn every 1" or in your own way designate
the 1" sections. When the warp is off the reel or warping board, slide the
bar through the ends of the warp. Lay the 1" sections in a raddle, and
proceed to wind on the warp with tension. You will not have to tie or fiddle
with the warp at all! This is Norman's old and fast way of getting a warp on
.

Hope this is helpful!
Charlotte in Texas


Re: Digest Number 17

Ian Bowers
 

As a Lancastrian

Of course it is the North of England


Best regards

Ian Bowers
Managing Director - George Weil & Sons Ltd

The leading supplier to Fabric Painters, Dyers and Printers, Glass Painters
Hand weavers, Hand Spinners and Dyers, Felt & Paper makers
based at Guildford, Surrey, UK
email md@georgeweil.co.uk

visit our new web site www.georgeweil.co.uk

phone 0 (+44) 1483 565800
fax 0 (+44) 1483 565807

----- Original Message -----
From: <bksnapa@aol.com>
To: <WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, August 25, 2001 3:35 PM
Subject: Re: [WeaveTech] Digest Number 17



In a message dated 8/25/01 2:55:49 AM, WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com writes:

<< The
Industrial Revolution was cradled all over the Industrial North of
England,
Lancashire can't claim it for themselves. >>

OOps sorry! As an ex-pat South-of-England person I rather insensitively
characterised Lancashire as North-of-England. Barbara


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Back apron bar

Karen Kelley Schultz <kksmaddogdesigns@...>
 

I have a CM loom, I warp front to back, and I continue to have problems
tying on to the back apron bar. I've tried what was suggested in the Cay
Garret book. I've tried the Debbie book suggestions. The problem is when
I'm weaving anything with very high tension (rugs) and get near the end, the
ties come undone. Is there a fool-proof method to tie on to this apron bar?

This just happened again on a rug I was weaving. Luckily I only had 3" to
go and was able to weight the warp with jugs of water. It looked so
ridiculous I had to take a picture to remind myself to not let this happen
again. Help!

kks


Re: Translation Please

Erica de ruiter <ederuiter@...>
 

Ondule (with accent on the e) means 'Undulating'.
Erica
Onderwerp: [WeaveTech] Translation Please


Re: Back apron bar

cyncewilliams@...
 

Hi Karen,
What are you doing? tieing about 1"worth of warp ends with an overhand
knot, wrapping that around the warp apron rod and tieing a knot with the 1st
knot holding the warp from slipping?
When I was at ISU, Naomi Towner said use 2 half hitches instead of 1.
That should take care of the problem. I wove a figurative boundweave rug sett
at 6 epi with Brown Sheep wool warp singles, no problems. And Naomi was using
conduit pipe for apron rods, nice fat things that knots just would not hold
around.

Cynthia in Altn,IL


Re: Weaver's Bottom

Joanne Hall <jah@...>
 

Hi Joan,
I did a little study about four years ago and related comfort on a loom
bench based on the height of the breast beam, with the bench in the
appropriate height for me. I tried about five different heights. I wrote
about it to the weavers list and I also summarized it on my webpage under -
comfort at the loom.

http://www.initco.net/~elh

I found that the higher the breast beam, the greater the comfort. If your

breast beam is not at least 35" high, you might put the loom up on blocks and
lengthen the treadle cords. This will put your knees much lower than your
hips and may solve your problem. This might also help your shed on more than
8 shafts as you can give your lamms more room to move. The Stadig loom feet
will raise the loom about one inch and you could put blocks under them.
Another suggestion, if the lengthy projects were multishaft, you could
weave those on four shafts, if possible. That might make the treadling a bit
easier as you will not be moving so many parts or lifting as much weight.
Joanne

Joan Swift wrote: What's the latest on healing/preventing weaver's bottom,
sometimes known as hip bursitis? Humbly yours,Joan in Oregon--

Joanne Hall
Elkhorn Mountains Weaving Studio
Clancy, MT 59634
http://www.initco.net/~elh


Re: Back apron bar

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I have a CM loom, I warp front to back, and I continue to have problems
tying on to the back apron bar.
Try the old nylon cord routine: Make an overhand knot in every 1 inch group
of warp then thread a slippery nylon cord through each group, laced to the
apron rod. An overhand knot in linen or cotton will not slip in this
situation and the nylon ajusts so all groups are very close to the right
tension. Waulk the warp groups as you first crank it on under tension.


Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Cyrefco

Ingrid Boesel <ingrid@...>
 

Can the Cyrefco system use the available software, such as Fiberworks,
WeaveIt, etc.?
Fiberworks PCW3.5 ( the older DOS) supports the Cyrefco loom. The Windows versions don't not work.

One more question about CM looms - can the shed be decent with a 16s
design?
Huge shed and level too.


Ingrid Boesel, the weaving half of Fiberworks PCW

Visit us at: http://www.fiberworks-pcw.com
Email: ingrid@fiberworks-pcw.com


Onduli

Ingrid Boesel <ingrid@...>
 

Hi Sigrid:

ONDULI. I understand the structure for this is plain weave, undulating using a special reed.

This is fabric made by that special reed we were talking of a month or more ago. The reed uprights do not go up and down at right angles to the length, but rather vary gradually change angles from leaning to the left, upright, leaning to the right and back to upright.

This result is the reed has large dents at the top small dents right below them. And visa versa. It looks like a series of fans.
The reed strikes the fell incrementally higher or lower each time the beater is brought forward.
This makes the fabric spaced and crammed in the same pick and it varies from pick to pick. The warp waves in sweeping curves. Absolutely gorgeous fabrics.

Sutton's Ideas in Weaving has some graphics of the reed and some cloth. Page 98-101
Ingrid Boesel, the weaving half of Fiberworks PCW

Visit us at: http://www.fiberworks-pcw.com
Email: ingrid@fiberworks-pcw.com


Re: Weaver's Bottom

Walter Turpening <walt.turpening@...>
 

To: Joan in Oregon
There are three of us who make sliding seat benches of various styles
(at least we make our presence at the fiber shows). Fireside Fiberarts,
Kessenich Looms and myself and we all will custom fit them to you and
your loom.

Walt Turpening


translation please

peter collingwood <peter@...>
 

I think we had these warp and weft 'ondule' reeds pretty well-covered in
a discussion back in July. So it should be in the archive. We also dealt
with other ways of achieving undulating weft by varying warp tension.

Peter Collingwood


Re: Beam bearings

Bonni Backe
 

A more permanent fix is to locate some thin Teflon sheet plastic.
What about the Teflon tape sold in the plumbing dept, for wrapping pipe
threads? It's thin and somewhat self-adhesive, as I recall from the last
time I was working on the plumbing...

Bonni in NH
Weevings Miniature Handwovens
http://weevings.com


Re: Looms: Rugs, Dobbies,...

Su Butler <apbutler@...>
 

BTW, this particular CM (apparently home-made) cannot make
decent sheds over 10 shafts, so even though it has 16, it's really
only an 8s loom.
HI Joan....a CM loom should be able to make decent sheds regardless of
number of shafts......(a homemade loom may be very shallow, which would
impede your sheds, but you can still make them work...they only need to be
large enough to get the shuttle thorugh).......you need to progressively tie
the rear shafts to lift higher and sink lower than the front shafts to get a
good shed....if your back and breast beams are at the same height, you can
tie your treadles at a slight angle, rising higher as they go toward the
rear to help accomplish this.....you may have to hang your shafts a bit
higher from the get-go to get better sheds on the rear shafts..........if
you have a Glimakra type arrangement where the back beam sits higher than
the breast beam, you have to fiddle with the length of each tie up cord to
get the same result. A CM loom works on balance and when everything is in
proper balance, sheds are clean, large enough to pass a shuttle through and
easy to treadle......

Su Butler :-) apbutler@ync.net
"We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our
fellow men." - Herman Melville


Re: Translation Please

Su Butler <apbutler@...>
 

what is this special reed?
HI Sigrid.....As I understand it, an Ondule (with an accent over the e) reed
has fan shaped dents, getting wider towards the top and more closely crammed
at the bottom. It works by moving the reed up and down during the weaving
process, thereby spacing the warp at different setts during the weaving.
Some of the American reed companies used to make ondule reeds, but have not
seen one advertised for some 10-15 years.......I don't think you are limited
to plain weave, although I suspect the spacing changes would show better in
that structure.....
The word Ondule, in my French/English dictionary means:
1. Yarn: ondulating, wavy
2. weave: Undulating, wavy
3. reed: Trapezoid

Su Butler :-) apbutler@ync.net
"We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our
fellow men." - Herman Melville


Re: Weaver's Bottom

fiberweaver@...
 

As to underwear - you can get the cotton Hanes with highcut
legs or Jockey, either is equally comfortable and they are
way above the pressure point you are talking about.

Many people also have sheep/lamb hides on their weaving
benches for absorption and padding.

You may also wish to get a sliding bench (I had one custom
made for me).

Do not cross your legs above the ankles.

Otherwise, the hips joints take a long time once injured
like this, be patient.

Sounds like everything you are doing will help speed it
along.
Carol


Re: translation please

amyfibre@...
 

In a message dated 8/27/01 8:00:32 AM Central Daylight Time,
peter@plysplit.demon.co.uk writes:

<< I think we had these warp and weft 'ondule' reeds pretty well-covered in
a discussion back in July. So it should be in the archive. We also dealt
with other ways of achieving undulating weft by varying warp tension. >>

In case anyone is looking for these archives....they will be accessed via
www.topica.com with your old Topica log in and ID.

For anyone who has joined us only since the switch, you will need to join the
group there (even though it is no longer active), and set up a Topica log in
and ID, to access the archives prior to 8/23 or so.

Amy
amyfibre@aol.com


Weaver's Bottom

Joan Swift <joanes@...>
 

What's the latest on healing/preventing weaver's bottom, sometimes known
as hip bursitis? Last November I wove 3-58" throws in 4 days, without fly
shuttle. Bad idea. I'm still suffering the effects of rolling so many
times from side to side (about 3,000) in so short a time. It was hurting,
but the deadline loomed, shall we say.

I've been doing some concentrated stretches recommended by a physical
therapist and doing without underpants (the seam falls right below the hip
bone where one sits). Also, occasionally sitting on 2 bags of frozen
peas. And always sitting on padded benches.

Humbly yours,
Joan in Oregon


Re: Looms: Rugs, Dobbies,...

Joan Swift <joanes@...>
 

The Walling Cam Action jack loom has its shafts simply on cams. One can
lift the shafts right out, to move heddles around.

Can the Cyrefco system use the available software, such as Fiberworks,
WeaveIt, etc.?

One more question about CM looms - can the shed be decent with a 16s
design?

Glad to be finally re-warping my old counter-marche (the warp beam fell
apart while weaving the 1st of 3 throws). Un-warping took 7 hours, but
the rewarping is going like a dream. BTW, this particular CM (apparently
home-made) cannot make decent sheds over 10 shafts, so even though it has
16, it's really only an 8s loom.

Joan