Date   

Re: Rope brakes on looms

Walter Turpening <walt.turpening@...>
 

Holly, et al,
No matter what we think of cotton cord as a soft, it is abrasive and in
fact a very fine polishing tool. The braided surface of the cord
actually polishes the wood and in turn the cord picks up the finish and
wood particles minimizing friction. So I recommend getting some 120
grit sand paper and lightly sanding the little area where the cord wraps
around the beam. I also suggest replacing the cord. I wouldn't use the
typical cord you can buy at WalMart or home centers because they are
loose braid so they stretch huge amounts or they are glazed with starch
and will slip right off the bat.

I use industrial cotton cord to weave the seats on my benches, etc.
Holly, email me your snail mail address and I can send you abit of cord
that should last quite a while. Include what length you need.

Walt T.


Re: Looms: Rugs, Dobbies,...

Laura Fry <laurafry@...>
 

I wouldn't use an AVL with the weighted brake for rugs - you
wouldn't be able to beat it in heavily enough. Most of the AVL
compu-dobby looms have the auto-cloth advance and weight arm
system......

AVL does make a rug loom. It may come with a compu-dobby
option.

Is your Cam-Action loom like the Hattersley?

Cheers,

Laura Fry
http://laurafry.com


AVL friction brake

Elizabeth Tritthart <etritthart@...>
 

To solve the problem of the slipping brake -- AVL suggests that one lightly take a sheet of sandpaper to the portion of the drum upon which the cord rests, thereby scuffing the finish (removing accomulated dust and dirt.) Then clean the surface with a dry cloth. Put back on the cord and it should hold much better.

Eliz


A substitute for silicon spray

Ruth Blau <ruthblau@...>
 

If you have a wood-to-wood situation that needs to slide & that you can't get to easily w/ wax or parafin, you might try baby powder. This was a hint we got at AVL in the workshop on maintaining your loom. For example, if you fly shuttle tracks get slow, put a bit of fine talcum powder on your finger tip or on a Q-Tip and apply it to the track.

Ruth


Re: Looms: Rugs, Dobbies,...

Su Butler <apbutler@...>
 

Joan asked:
2. Since the AVL dobby looms are so solid and square, I'm
assuming that they are good for rugs. True?
I would not use an AVL for rugs, with the exception of their Rug loom....the
braking system on AVL is not realy suitable to the high tension required in
rug weaving. And the framing members of an AVL are not as heavy and sturdy
as in Scandinavian CM looms or looms built and designed as rug looms. The
beaters are not as heavy either.....

3. My favorite loom type is CM. There was some mention
recently that the Toika may one day be adaptable to a computer >dobby
system. Is this true,

It is already possible to add a computerized lifting system to a
Toika....Toika sells a component to do just that......

Su Butler :-) apbutler@ync.net
"We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our
fellow men." - Herman Melville


Looms: Rugs, Dobbies,...

Joan Swift <joanes@...>
 

1. For a low profile rug loom, I'm presently borrowing a Walling
Cam-Action loom from N. Hollywood, CA. It's apparently fairly old. In
spite of having only 4S and a 36" width, it's a wonderful loom to work
with, both in warping and weaving. Very user friendly. And it's very
solid and heavy and takes on rugs with aplomb. I wish our present-day
multiple harness looms were that comfortable and ergonomic.

2. Since the AVL dobby looms are so solid and square, I'm assuming that
they are good for rugs. True?

3. My favorite loom type is CM. There was some mention recently that the
Toika may one day be adaptable to a computer dobby system. Is this true,
or are only jack looms suitable for this? The Megado is under debate as
to its true nature, apparently.

Joan in Oregon


Computer dobby

Philip Costa <philcosta@...>
 

Does anyone on the list know if plans exist to build a computer dobby?
Any help would be appreciated.

Philip Costa


Plans for computer dobby

Philip Costa <philcosta@...>
 

Does anyone on the list know if plans exist to build a computer dobby?
Any help would be appreciated.

Philip Costa


Plans for computer dobby

Philip Costa <philcosta@...>
 

Does anyone on the list know if plans exist to build a computer dobby?
Any help would be appreciated.

Philip Costa


Plans for computer dobby

Philip Costa <philcosta@...>
 

Does anyone on the list know if plans exist to build a computer dobby?
Any help would be appreciated.

Philip Costa


Re: Trip to England

MargeCoe@...
 

of the Lancashire
textile industry-the cradle of the industrial revolution.
Ouch! Who says they're the cradle, they I suspect? They stuck with cotton,
fitting to their damper climate, but cotton doesn't grow there. We, we on
the other side of the Pennines stuck with wool. For 200 years from 1070
Bradford's woollen industry grew (did we even know about cotton then?). The
Industrial Revolution was cradled all over the Industrial North of England,
Lancashire can't claim it for themselves.

We ex-pat Yorkshire folk can't let unsupported statements like this pass,
this is how urban myths start. It's enough to get the Roses warring again.

Margaret
-------------------------------------------------------------------
MargeCoe@concentric.net
Tucson, AZ USA
-------------------------------------------------------------------


Huck with painted warp

Bonnie Inouye <bonnieinouye@...>
 

Sarah asked about huck lace for a painted warp, with a heavy warp and finer weft. Anne is right, you will make cloth no matter which sizes of yarn are used. Now consider what kind of cloth you are wanting to make. A woven lace, in general (huck being just one example) produces a light, airy cloth with interesting distortions (curves) of the threads. The design is created by contrast between areas of plain weave and areas with longer floats. The design appears most clearly when the cloth is held to the light, or placed against a contrasting, solid background. This is why we use lace for curtains and for table linens. It is also why lace is traditionally woven with all yarns of the same value.

The distortions increase with washing, particularly when the sett is open and the threads have room to move. The designs created by the curving threads will make circles and ovals, flower petal shapes, when warp and weft are about the same size. Otherwise the shapes are altered and you'll need to sample and to wash the samples to see what happens. Wet-finishing is very important, especially for laces.

When working with painted warps, I usually sett more closely than normal for a given structure, in order to emphasize the role of the warp (instead of using a heavier yarn for the warp.) I haven't done much woven lace because it needs to be sett less closely than normal, and it looks best when woven in all one value. It is possible to paint a warp with various colors of one value, and this could be very pretty in a lace weave. Another option would be to include stripes of painted warp in an otherwise solid color warp, and let the lace show more in the latter. Painted warps normally create fine vertical lines in the cloth, and these lines will bend with a lace weave. In the pieces I've done that combine dyed warp and lace, the pattern of the lace is hard to see unless the cloth is held to the light, so a very simple pattern seems appropriate.

Bonnie Inouye
www.geocities.com/bonnieinouye


Re: Friction Brakes

Michael Davis <mdavis@...>
 

This could be due to the ropes polishing the shaft over time. Take
Bill's suggestion and sand the shaft with 80-100 grit sandpaper to
roughen the wood which will then have sufficient friction to hold back
the warp.

Mike Davis

Message: 19
Date: Fri, 24 Aug 2001 15:00:25 -0000
From: willgee@mindspring.com
Subject: rope brakes

Hi... the only thing I've ever seen applied to rope brakes that made
any sense was powdered rosin...the stuff that keeps gymnasts and
ballerinas from slipping on the wooden floor. glen
Well, but :) When I first started using this braking system, the loom
was only a year or so old and had been oiled as part of the finishing
(Harrisville kit). No problems back then, or when it was last oiled,
years ago now. Only problems are recently.
Only problems are recently.

something has changed


Re: Weaving Huck Lace

Anne Wells <arwells@...>
 

Traditionally, huck lace is woven with warp and weft the same weight, I
believe, just as Marty says. However, it *can* be woven with whatever you
feel like. You can put on a heavy cotton warp and weave with rags. You can
weave with weft threads that are larger or smaller than the warp. I've tried
this, using wefts both larger than the warp and smaller than the warp. The
end result depends on a lot of things, though. If you sett the warp closer,
then a smaller weft might look more balanced. If you sett the warp looser,
then a larger weft will look more balanced. Or, leave the warp sett as one
would normally set things up for lace, and weave away with whatever yarn you
wish and get unusual cloth. Maybe you are weaving a cotton warp with a linen
weft? Size differences between the warp and weft will work out differently.
Or weave a fine wool with silk, or a linen with rayon. And so on.
Sometimes I like the results, and sometimes I don't. But most anything will
work and be cloth. <g> I like to think there are no "rules" in weaving,
just "guidelines." Experiment and have some fun!
Anne
arwells@erols.com

MartyCP@aol.com wrote:

< Does anyone have any experience weaving huck lace where the warp is a
thicker
yarn than the weft? >>

I think that huck lace is a balanced weave, which means the warp and weft
have to be the same size.


Re: Friction Brakes

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

the loom
was only a year or so old and had been oiled as part of the finishing
(Harrisville kit). No problems back then, or when it was last oiled,
years ago now. Only problems are recently.
Hmmm.... Still, it won't hurt to wash the ropes and the beam area where they
touch; something has changed or been added to the brake. It may be that the
ropes are shot, in which case that's easy to replace. Difficult to talk
about without seeing the loom itself. Usually a brake problem is a result of
re-assembling the parts wrong but in your case that's not the reason
obviously.

-- Happy Shuttling ! Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: Friction Brakes

Holly <holly@...>
 

Bill writes:

<<Try to keep any oils, waxes, grease and
silicones out of the brakes, the ropes and the area that the ropes
touch.>>

Well, but :) When I first started using this braking system, the loom
was only a year or so old and had been oiled as part of the finishing
(Harrisville kit). No problems back then, or when it was last oiled,
years ago now. Only problems are recently.

Holly


Re: Friction Brakes

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

The ropes are not actually wound on the brake drums, but directly on the
warp beam--it's not sectional. It has received a couple coats of
furniture oil, but that's it, and nothing recently.
I'd suspect that the oil has done it. I'd remove the ropes, wash them and
the braking area with soap & water. Try to keep any oils, waxes, grease and
silicones out of the brakes, the ropes and the area that the ropes touch. If
you wash the ropes, weight them and hang to dry.
If the oil continues to wick up to the surface you may have to put a leather
or cotton strap around the beam to act as a brake drum surface, until the
oil is subdued.
Hope this gives you some ideas !

-- Happy Shuttling ! Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: rust preventer

Garth Fletcher
 

I think what you might be looking for is called:
"VPI" (Vapor Phase Inhibitor), also known as
"VCI" (Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors)

The basic idea is that the protective material slowly releases
vapors which deposit on the enclosed metal to inhibit rust.
Is available in the form of papers, films, and "emitters" which
can be enclosed in other wrappings.

An AltaVista search for "+VPI +packaging +corrosion" yielded many
matches, including:

http://www.daubertvci.com/
http://www.roncolabs.com/
http://www.greatlakespkgsys.com/Products/VCI-Papers.htm

A brief summary copied from the Daubert VCI site:

"The term "VCI" stands for Volatile Corrosion Inhibitor.

The chemicals in Daubert VCI products are volatile. When metals are wrapped or
packaged in VCI, the chemicals volatilize in the packaging environment, forming
a protective molecular layer on the surface of the metal. This protective layer
serves as a barrier, preventing moisture, salt, dirt, oxygen, and other
corrosion causing materials from depositing directly on the metal and causing
rust and corrosion.

Airtight packing is not required!

Simply store or ship metal parts in VCI packaging. When the parts are unwrapped,
the protective layer immediately begins to dissipate. The metal parts are clean,
corrosion-free and ready to use. No washing, dipping or cleaning is necessary. "


Another approach is to remove moisture; this usually requires air-tight
packaging plus "dessicant" bags to absorb what small amounts of moisture creep in.

Finally, there are anti-corrosion greases and coatings which can be applied
to exposed metal. Depending on the thickness and exposure these can provide
protection for a number of years. The longer lasting coatings tend to be thick
and greasy - something you want to remove before putting the machine back into
use...

Hope this helps
--
Garth Fletcher, President, JacqCAD International
288 Marcel Road, Mason, NH 03048-4704
(603) 878-4749 fax: (603) 878-0547
JacqCAD MASTER website: www.JacqCAD.com


rope brakes

willgee@...
 

Hi... the only thing I've ever seen applied to rope brakes that made
any sense was powdered rosin...the stuff that keeps gymnasts and
ballerinas from slipping on the wooden floor. glen


Re: Re : Silicones/Friction Brakes

Holly <holly@...>
 

Bill writes:

<<Re the brake, did you change the ropes and possibly change direction
on how they're wound on the brake drum ?>>

I have moved a couple times (OK, actually 6 :) since first setting up
the brake system, and always check the magazine article to make sure
it's set up right. Doesn't work at all when it's wound backwards. I've
also tried winding the cord an extra time (article specified 3 wraps,
I've tried 4, there's not really room for 5 with my warp sticks) with
very little additional friction added, not enough to keep the tension
good.

<<Have the brake drums been refinished ? >>

The ropes are not actually wound on the brake drums, but directly on the
warp beam--it's not sectional. It has received a couple coats of
furniture oil, but that's it, and nothing recently.

<<Are the ropes old and possibly have a glaze on them ?>>

I just checked. There's no visible residue or sign of wear or polish
due to useage. It's heavy cotton cord, about 6.5 mm in diameter.

Holly