Date   

Pattern and Loom" Question

Krystal Ruth Morgan <krystalmorgan@...>
 

I am reading "Pattern and Loom" by John Becker, and I have a question
about Figure 74 B-E on pg. 93. This is a diagram of a historic fabric
woven in taquete.

The author gives B as "the normal theoretical method for a draw
arrangement." It appears to me that one thread passes through a heddle
on a pattern shaft, and the next thread passes through a heddle on a
ground shaft. In other words, the threading looks the same as the one
for a regular shaft loom.. Is this correct, or am I misunderstanding
something? The other drafts I have seen for drawlooms (in other weave
structuress) show each warp thread passing through both a heddle on a
pattern shaft and a heddle on a ground shaft.

Thank you for your help!

Krystal


Re: name this weave

Erica de ruiter <ederuiter@...>
 

I am not suggesting a name for this weave structure, but I'd like to put up
a question. The tie-p mentioned here I saw named in several older weaving
books as: 'Batavia tie up', showing half of the adjacent shafts up and half
of the adjacent shafts lowered in a one step rotation. It can be for any
even number of shafts. Does anyone know where this name originates from?

The drawdown looks quite attractive.

Erica


Onderwerp: [WeaveTech] name this weave


Re: name this weave

Laura Fry <laurafry@...>
 

"Max's Magical Mystery Weave"?

;^)

Cheers,

Laura Fry
http://laurafry.com


Re: Slipping counters, Digest 104

Laura Fry <laurafry@...>
 

My revolving meter is a Veeder-Root brand. It was listed as
being for the textile industry.

We also have an electric "click" meter. It is activated by the
sweep arm on the dobby and counts picks woven.

If anyone goes electric, be aware that there are two different
switches. We chose the wrong one the first time out and burned
out two counters before twigging. :)

The first switch is a straight push down activation. When the
switch is down, the current continues to flow - hence the
burn out. The second type has an elbow type arm. Once the
sweep arm passes the switch it flips out of the way so the
shed can remain open (for bobbin changes, etc.,) without
damage to the counter.

Right now, we also have electric switches on the loom to
activate the air assisted fly shuttle. After three and a half
years of use (in other words *lots* of beats) we've worn out
the switches twice. We now buy the switches at Radio Shack
to keep as spares. They are simple to change out and take
about 15 minutes - *if* you have a spare one. As I often
weave late at night or weekends (every day is a potential
"work" day) having spares are crucial. :)

Laura Fry
http://laurafry.com


Re: Slipping counters, Digest 104

emeltz@...
 

--- In WeaveTech@y..., Allen Fannin <aafannin@s...> wrote:
At 09:59 AM 11/9/01 -0800, Joan Swift <joanes@e...>wrote:

Not so that handweavers do not want to look to other industries -
Where
can these items be purchased?
Looking in the Yellow Pages or in Thomas' Register under "counters"
will work.

AAF
Hello. I'm a weaver and a librarian and I just thought I would let
you know that you can go to thomasregister.com and look
up "counters". (I just recently tried it at work for the first time
yesterday so it seemed an odd coincidence to read about it here) The
huge, multi-volume set of product catalogs is available on the
Internet. You can search without registering and then in some cases
you might want to register to get further information, but it's
free. There are lots of "counters" listed but I saw counters-thread,
counters-textile, and counters-textile machinery.
Elyse Meltz
Syracuse, NY>



ALLEN FANNIN, Adjunct Prof., Textile Science
Department of Fashion & Design Technology
224 Slocum Hall / Rm 215
College of Visual and Performing Arts
Syracuse University
Syracuse, New York 13244-1250
Phone: (315) 443-1256/4644
FAX: (315) 443- 2991

mailto:aafannin@s...>

http://syllabus.syr.edu/TEX/aafannin


name this weave

Max Hailperin <max@...>
 

I brought a scarf to my local weavers' group this week, done (using
the Habu vegetable-dyed silk) in a weave structure I've been
experimenting with. As so often, everyone asked "what weave is that."
And, as usual, I had no answer. Can anyone on this list help me out
with a name for this weave? I'll specify it below as
tie-up/threading/treadling.

Shafts & treadles: 6 & 6

Tie-up: straight 3/3, i.e.: treadle 1 lifts 123, then 234, 345, 456, 561, 612

Threading and treadling (both the same, spaces inserted to show pattern):
12345 2 5 23456 3 6 34561 4 1 45612 5 2 56123 6 3 61234 1 4

This is basically an advancing twill variation, but the threads do
some interesting things you won't see in a drawdown. First, they
bunch up in the five-thread twill runs and push apart in two-thread
groups that are woven on opposite sheds. The effect is somewhat like
that of (Atwater-)Bronson lace -- you could say that this weave is to
advancing twill as Bronson lace is to basket weave. Second, there is
some tendency to form a three-dimensional waffle-like structure. How
pronounced the lace-like feature is vs. how pronounced the waffle-like
is depends on things like sett, fiber, and finishing. Of course the
twillness is also somewhat apparent -- though in the closely analogous
colors I've found to be most effective, it is subtle.

Anyhow -- this seems like an obvious enough structure that surely
someone before me used it and gave it a name. What is it? Or,
failing that, is there some better systematic name than "lacy/waffley
advancing twill variation"? Many thanks. -max


Re: Countermarch shed

nancy
 

yes???
what monograph?? where may it be obtained???

At 08:24 AM 11/11/2001 -0500, you wrote:
Dear Ben (and other Countermarch folk),

In reading through Peggy Hoyt's monograph on Damask, there was an interesting
notation from Marie Kulchinski.


Re: Name this weave....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

'Batavia tie up', showing half of the adjacent shafts up and half
of the adjacent shafts lowered in a one step rotation.
Hi,
A French term for a 2/2/ twill on 4 shafts.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: Countermarch shed

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

She had taken the short lamms, cut off the
end where the rod goes through, (allowing them to pivot) and secured each
lamm under the shaft with Texsolv cord.
I use this method on our 60" CM. I added a third connector in the center and
adjusted it to be slightly tighter than the end connectors. This works
better for me than just two connections; the lamm teeters back and forth a
little bit, so some of the pull goes to the center. The downside is when
moving heddles prior to or during threading, the center connection has to be
unhooked for a while.

More Lamm chat:
The sinking lamms should be as short as possible. ( Depends on the loom
design )
The rising lamms should be longer, to help balance the shafts.
Moving the pivot axle of one set of lamms to the opposite side may cut the
interference. ( Depends on the loom design )
Moving the pivot axle of all lamms to the outside of the loom frame will
decrease treadle effort a bit, for the side treadles.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Countermarch shed

WC3424@...
 

Dear Ben (and other Countermarch folk),

In reading through Peggy Hoyt's monograph on Damask, there was an interesting
notation from Marie Kulchinski. She had taken the short lamms, cut off the
end where the rod goes through, (allowing them to pivot) and secured each
lamm under the shaft with Texsolv cord. If you decide to do this, each lamm
needs to be very close to the bottom of the shaft, as close as possible. The
bottom rod which holds the long lams was raised 2 1/2" to 3". This
eliminates the lams from bumping one another and causing me frustration with
"different sizes of sheds".

We located rather larger hooks at a hardware store. These have now been
added to all the holes in the treadles. The hooks fit perfectly through the
holes and I screwed on a small washer and nut. Tie-ups are a snap now as I
merely slip the cord onto the hook. If you email me privately, I could send
you a JPG of one of the hooks.

Since changing from the Glimakra single unit draw to the Myrehed combination,
the back beam has been raised. Most of the barn looms have the back beam
higher than the breast beam. I mention this since you wrote about weaving
primarily on a barn loom.

If Suzie Roddy is lurking, perhaps she can add some notes. Suzie weaves
these fantastic rugs on her Glimakra. As I am remembering, her shed is huge.
Perhaps she can offer additional input.

Charlotte in Texas


Re: name this weave

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

"lacy/waffley
advancing twill variation"?
Hey -
I like Lacy Waffely Advancing Twill Variation !

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: Countermarch shed

Joanne Hall <jah@...>
 

Hi Ben,
I have tie up instructions on my webpage. Go to weaving looms, then tie
up inst. then the type of countermarch that you have, horizontal or
vertical. And with 8 shafts, it should take about 15 minutes at the most, to
tie up the lamms and treadles.

http://www.initco.net/~elh

Joanne

Ben Barnard wrote:

I have an 8 harness Glimakra Standard. I do not get a good even
shed. I've tried tie-ups
Ben--
Joanne Hall
Elkhorn Mountains Weaving Studio
Clancy, MT 59634
http://www.initco.net/~elh


interesting question

Laura Fry <laurafry@...>
 

I received this query but have no knowledge of Navaho rugs or
the chart. Anyone know?

Laura Fry
http://laurafry.com


"I work in Market Research and am often asked to graph data in
what's
called a "mirra mecca" chart. This chart somewhat resembles a
Navaho
blanket when complete. I do not know the origin of the term or
even how
to spell it correctly. And, I've yet to meet anyone in my field
who
can. I understand that it is some sort of woven art, perhaps from
Asia.

Can you help me with this intriguing question?

Kelley Styring"


Countermarch shed

Ben Barnard <bengoodwater@...>
 

I have an 8 harness Glimakra Standard. I do not get a good even
shed. I've tried tie-ups with the lower & upper lamms in all
positions from high to low. Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong?
I've been weaving for years on a barn frame with no problems. Also
is there any quick, easy way to do all those blasted treadle tie-ups
without spending 4 hours under the loom?
Any help will be appreciated,
Ben


Re: Slipping things

Walter Turpening <walt.turpening@...>
 

Other industries have slipping problems that have been discussed here.
Some of their solutions are:
Oil industry- How to accurately (to the 1/10 of a foot) repeatably
measure (under tension) cable up to 35,000 feet long? Put the cable
between two wheels in spring contact and count the revolutions of the
wheels. The high tech counting usually done with optical devices but
are backed up with a toggle counter. I might see what I can do to make
one for me to use on cotton cord and Ellen (my wife and weaver) to try
on her warps.

Auto industry- Loosening bolts and nuts. Solution- Lock Tite. A 'glue'
calibrated to in various strengths from "it ain't coming loose for no
one but God" to "a small wrench will do nicely" in about 4 or 5
different strengths. Actually, they are different colors and available
from most all auto parts dealers. The least strong to second strongest
should do well for every metal to metal nut and bolt problem on looms.
These Lock Tite's made to allow things to be taken apart but not to
vibrate loose. These are not for screws in wood.


Re: Interesting question....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

called a "mirra mecca" chart. This chart somewhat resembles a
Navaho
I'd guess that the " Mirra " refers to the region, wherever it was woven. A
Mecca Rug is a Shiraz Rug.
My little library says it's " tied in senna knots but usually ghiordes
knots, a medium long wool pile...... similar to Saraband ", which has a
shorter wool pile. Persion type rugs.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: Countermarch shed

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I have an 8 harness Glimakra Standard. I do not get a good even
shed. I've tried tie-ups with the lower & upper lamms in all
positions from high to low.
Hi,
I don't quite know what you really mean by a good, even shed.
Are the front shafts opening more than the rear shafts ?
Is the shed just too small overall ?
Are some warps higher and so the shed bottom is bumpy ?
Are you judging the shed with the warp on and up to weave tension ?
Hasd the loom been recently been assembled after a move ?
I'd like to have more info, either privately or publicly; a CM responds to
different adjustments for different conditions ( which is why I like it ).

is there any quick, easy way to do all those blasted treadle tie-ups
without spending 4 hours under the loom?
Yep, one can make tie-up cords in sets; one set for all the #1
shaft/treadles, one for all the # 2 shaft/treadles, and so on ( for rear
hinged treadles ) or have all the rising cords the same and all the sinking
cords the same ( for front hinged treadles ). That speeds it up. You can
also just leave all of the unused cords hang from the lamms, then you only
have to tie to the treadles. It looks very untidy down there but if they're
color coded, you'll have no trouble hooking them up.
You might consider a skeleton tie-up and use two feet, then you'll possibly
have little change between drafts.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


re warping Mill

peter collingwood <peter@...>
 

Just tie a cord from one upright post to the other so it is in contact
with half the circumference of the mill, low down. One end is fixed to a
post, the other goes over a pulley and down to a weight. So the cord is
now under tension, the brake is on.
To relieve tension, there is a string from weight up to a hook above.
Loop at end of string goes over hook, weight no longer acts, brake is
off.
I have had this on a self-made vertical mill for nearly 40 years and the
cord is only just beginning to wear grooves in the uprights of mill.
Easy to move it up or down a bit when this gets serious.
Always use the simplest solution!

Peter Collingwood


Re: Slipping counters

Judie Eatough
 

Darlene,

Since you are asking about the counter on the warping wheel -- I am
wondering if you have the same problem I saw when I first used mine.
The lever that needs to be tripped each revolution started slipping and
tightening the screw does not help because it just come loose again. So
I looked and found a little nut for that screw and used it and now the
lever works just fine and has not come loose. I don't know if the
original nut fell off during shipping. Perhaps this might help.

Judie


Re: Warping Mill

Patricia A. Lawrence <weavesations@...>
 

Thanks Brucie, I'm not sure I understand.......but i'll show it to DH and
see if he can make sense of it.....



At 03:56 PM 11/09/2001, you wrote:
At 11:57 AM 11/9/01 -0500, you wrote:
I all. I use a vertical warping mill....its an old one. I've been told
that I can put a break on it, does anyone have directions/or can tell me
how to do this?
I hope I can say this so it makes sense - a picture would be so easy. I
have a brake which is a cord wrapped around the vertical post. There is a
wooden stick fastened at one end and when it is swung around the cord
tightens and the friction acts as a brake. Otherwise it is loose.




Brucie


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Patricia Lawrence, Weaver
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email: <weavesations@md.prestige.net>