Date   

Re: very fine chenille

Dick Lindell <dlindell@...>
 

Try Shel B. in Poughkeepsie, NY 845-454-8836. I just bought some from him
two weeks ago. Good stuff at a good price.


Does anyone know of a source for rayon chenille that is LESS than 2000 ypp?
Sorry, I meant FINER than 2000 ypp!

Dick Lindell,Weaver mailto:dlindell@netexpress.net
The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.
-- Albert Einstein


CM Tie-up 2

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I forgot to credit Peter Collingwood for finding and sharing this CM Tie-up.
Thanks Peter !

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


CM Tie-up

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I have totally forgotten how to put sketches onto Weavetech's picture pages
( Yahoo ), and I got lost in Yahoo trying to do it, so I've put the
Cambridgeshire Guild ( Mrs. Kenneth Smith's ) Countermarch Tie-ups onto my
webpage at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ca3/billk/images/uktrdl.1.gif
http://www.angelfire.com/ca3/billk/images/uktrdl.2.gif
http://www.angelfire.com/ca3/billk/images/uktrdl.3.gif

( #3 is my sketch of the tie-up )

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: countermarch loom tie-up....

Marge Coe <MargeCoe@...>
 

I don't know whether this type of thing can be placed in the WeaveTech
archives, but perhaps Ralph Griswold would be interested in placing it in
his wonderful archives:

Ralph@cs.arizona.edu

Margatet
-------------------------------------------------------------------
MargeCoe@att.net
Tucson, AZ USA
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Re: countermarch loom tie-up....

Jim Stovall
 

Peter, Bill -

Perhaps another solution would be to ask Prof Ralph Griswold to include
the info on his webpages of old books, etc., so that they would be
universally accessable. His email address is ralph@cs.arizona.edu.

"Bill Koepp" <bgkoe@ncinternet.net> writes: > > P.Collingwood wrote: If I
could send a photocopy of these pages to some list member, maybe they
could put them in the Archive.

I also have a copy of this, who do I contact to enter it into the
archives ?


Re: warping wolves or x frame

Laura Fry <laurafry@...>
 

I've been providing "active" storage for a Baby Wolf for
several months now, and found a small cardboard box will lift
the shafts enough to make threading less of a chore. I just
treadle to lift all shafts, and slip the box in between the
loom frame and the bottom of the shafts. It's still a squeeze,
but.... :)

The other thing I've noticed is that when all 8 shafts are
used, the bottom of the shed lifts slightly off the shuttle
race. On the Baby Wolf, it's a bit difficult to raise the
height of the back beam, but the Ah-ha moment arrived on the
current warp when I looked at the loom sideways on and realized
that the second back beam is already slightly higher than
the "regular" beam. Next warp I'm going to route the warp
from the warp beam over the second beam. This will
accomplish two things - increase the distance between the
heddles and the back beam, and raise it slightly as well.

But first to finish off the 20/2 merc. cotton currently on it.

cheers,

Laura Fry
http://laurafry.com


Re: tall weaver

Linda <flschultz@...>
 

Sounds like you have a case of Male Weaver's Woes. I
to have the same problem. The problem is that since
most weavers today are female, so the looms are
designed for shorter weavers.
I hate to burst your bubble, Ben, but there are tall women weavers, also.
The range of height in men and women is large. While the average height of
women is smaller than men, there is so much overlap between the two groups
that to focus on sex differences is meaningless. It may be more accurate to
say that looms are designed around a narrow range of leg lengths. What has
been a useful discussion is what parts of the loom interfere with ease of
use for weavers who are not "average". It is also interesting to know which
looms seem to fit a larger range of heights (either above or below average).

Linda
Winnipeg


Folding Baby Wolf to thread

Brucie Connell <bruciec@...>
 

At 05:52 PM 11/5/01 -0500, you wrote:
. This is very old knowledge on my part (read: maybe
not reliable), and based on F2B threading
Yes I always thread my Baby wolf after folding it. But I warp B2F. And I take the reed out when threading. I use shoelaces to suspend the lease sticks behind the castle.


Brucie


Re: warping wolves or x frame

Murphy, Alice <amurphy@...>
 

I have an x frame folding loom, the Bernat, old timer, but good weaving
on it. I generally warp b to F on that and on the other big loom as
well. Have a sectional warp beam. If I have a chained warp i wind f to
B then thread. The beater just comes out as it can be lifted out. Has
three positions to adjust height of beater. the other loom Leclerc Mira
has front and back beams that can be lifted off for threading and or
warping. So whatever works for your is best for you!
Alice in MO

"Weavers get warped,dulcimer players fret but librarians get booked!"


Re: warping wolves or x frame

Dianna Rose Downs <rdowns@...>
 

this should read...


I have had a baby wolf for about 8 months now and I close the loom as you
describe but only part way, not all the way closed. The last time I warped
it, I took the back beam off, a little too much work, with the brake being
sorry, Rose
Princeton, TX

our little family...
http://web2.airmail.net/gdowns/


warping wolves or x frame

Dianna Rose Downs <rdowns@...>
 

"I believe users of the Schacht "Wolf" looms fold the loom to gain closer
access to the heddles. This is very old knowledge on my part (read: maybe
not reliable), and based on F2B threading: w/ loom open, place lease sticks
on front beam. Sley the reed. Close the loom. Go to the back of the
loom, and (sitting on a low stool) thread the heddles from behind. Open
the loom. Tie onto the back apron. Wind on.
Ruth"

Ruth,

I have had a baby wolf for about 8 months now and I close the loom as you
describe but only part way, now all the way closed. The last time I warped
it, I took the back beam off, a little too much work, with the brake being
attached to it, for me. I just put sectional rakes on the warp beam and
will be warping b2t on the next warp, towels for christmas gifts. I think
I will be removing the breast beam, two screws and it's free, and rotating
the beater assembly back and onto the floor instead of taking it off to
warp. Frankly, this looks a lot easier than f2b to me. Regardless of how
much I fold it up, I am still reaching between the warp beam and the back
beam, then down to the heddles, then up to the reed. I do enjoy this loom,
its nice to fold it up and drag back to the bedroom when we need more room.
These observations might be of use on other x frame looms, I don't know,
but I hope so!

Rose Downs
Princeton, TX

our little family...
http://web2.airmail.net/gdowns/


surgery and countermarch loom tie-up

peter collingwood <peter@...>
 

My article on the method alluded to by Jo Anne appeared in the
'Quarterly Journal of the Guilds, of Weavers, Spinners and Dyers',
Number 49, March, 1964, pages 592 and 593. It does involve considerable
preliminary work under the loom, and the use of a lot of loom cord; but
once fixed all tie-up changes can be done from a board at the back of
the loom.

If I could send a photocopy of these pages to some list member, maybe
they could put them in the Archive.
I am often asked about this method, which I found on the loom of a
weaver near Cambridge. I do not know who invented it.

Peter Collingwood


Re: Digest Number 101

bksnapa@...
 

In a message dated 11/6/01 2:36:05 AM, WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com writes:

<< I am not familiar with this loom so I am in purely theoretical territory

here, but I wonder if others could comment: since this is a jack loom,

and the heddle eyes will rest below the cloth plane when at rest, won't

the warp tension tend to counteract a little of the harness weight? >>

I suppose that warp tension would counteract the shaft weight on the first
part of making the shed but will increase it in making the upper part of it.
It appears that the most efficient way of using this jack loom with rachet
brake is to keep warp tension somewhat relaxed. It will help in shed-making
and in keeping the rachet brake from spinning out of control when released.

Barbara in Napa, CA


Re: Digest Number 101

bksnapa@...
 

In a message dated 11/6/01 2:36:05 AM, WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com writes:

<< I believe users of the Schacht "Wolf" looms fold the loom to gain closer

access to the heddles. >>

Ruth,
My Gilmore has a sectional beam so I will be working B2F. It is also quite a
bit heavier that the Schacht. However, now that I have had the courage to
remove the breast beam I will be able to move in close to the heddles for
threading.
Barbara


Re: Digest Number 101

bksnapa@...
 

In a message dated 11/6/01 2:36:05 AM, WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com writes:

<< Use candle wax or paraffin in the castle grooves ( if any ) and that'll

help; part of the effort is plain old friction. >>

Bill,
Thank you for reminding me that this is a jack loom. I am used to
countermarches so didn't immediately think of the need for shaft weight to
hold down the warp. All this advice is SO helpful.

So I'll stick with a slick wax job on the grooves and shaft frames and make
sure that the loom is level so that there is no binding in the grooves. And
maybe a lubricant on all the treadle and jack pivot points. This is going to
be a smooth operating loom! Now, if we could only reduce the banging and
clanging noise.

Barbara in Napa, CA


Re: tall weaver

cyncewilliams@...
 

In a message dated 11/6/2001 9:55:39 AM, flschultz@shaw.ca writes:

<< The problem is that since
most weavers today are female, so the looms are
designed for shorter weavers.
I hate to burst your bubble, Ben, but there are tall women weavers, also.
The range of height in men and women is large. While the average height of
women is smaller than men, >>

And I'd bet that modern looms are based on the measurements of looms 2-3
centuries ago. We've all grown taller since then. Better food, better
medicine--Maybe loom makers need to rethink their dimensions.

Cynthia


Re: countermarch loom tie-up....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

If I could send a photocopy of these pages to some list member, maybe
they could put them in the Archive.
I also have a copy of this, who do I contact to enter it into the archives ?

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: tall weaver

ben barnard <bengoodwater@...>
 

Christopher,
Sounds like you have a case of Male Weaver's Woes. I
to have the same problem. The problem is that since
most weavers today are female, so the looms are
designed for shorter weavers. I have two looms that I
don't have this problem with. A ten harness Glimakra
Standard (counter-march) and a 200 year old barnframe
(counter-balance). The old loom is the best with tons
of legroom. I purchased it in New Hampshire last year.
I'd always heard all kinds of horror stories about
the old looms but this one is a dream to weave on. I
have two jack looms that are now in storage. I will
never understand why today's weavers want to use those
tiny little looms. They're OK for sampling, but
aren't comfortable weaving on for any length of time.
Hope you find a loom that fits. you'll find you can
weave much faster and longer when you aren't cramped
in one of the compacts.
Happy Weaving,
Wvr. Ben
--- Christopher Allworth <all@istar.ca> wrote:
Hello,
Can anyone suggest a loom (counterbalance
preferred), that
can accomodate a 6' 2" person? I have been weaving
with a Leclerc
Mira, only being able to put one foot on at a
time(leg at angle since
my knees strike the woven cloth), the breast beam
being just too
low(31" high).

I found a Leclerc with a higher breast beam of 34".
My legs
can now be on the treadles together after all this
time and while
they feel wonderful being together again, my knees
are now knocking
on the cloth beam preventing me from snuggling up
close to the breast
beam! The cloth beam is 11 inches from the front of
the loom.

A very helpful soul has suggested a Scandinavian
style of
loom, but I would be grateful for any advice since I
really do love
weaving!

Cheers and thanks - Christopher



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Re: surgery and countermarche looms

Jim Stovall
 

I have a photo copy of this, but it is lost deep in unsorted weaving info
files. I believe the author is Peter Collingwood. Perhaps he could
assist.

On Mon, 5 Nov 2001 13:15:45 -0800 Jo Anne Ryeburn <ryeburn@sfu.ca>
writes:

I have a vague memory of a method of tying the lams and
treadles of a countermarch to cords that are fastened in the back of
the loom, where they can be manipulated in any way desired as far as
making connections is concerned. Has anyone heard anything about
such a method?


Re: Handspun warp

Michelle & Cliff Rudy <rudymm@...>
 

Marge Coe wrote:

Hi all, I've read that the Navajo use their best (longest) fleece to spin
warps finely and tightly. Then the yarn is moistened (fingers dipped in
water) as it is wound into a ball and allowed to dry so that the twist is
set.
. . well I feel this statement would be more
accurate if it was written in the past tense.
The last time I saw any Navajo weaver actually weaving she was using
commercial singles. In the active trading posts I've visited ... there were hanks of
commercial singles in all sorts of colors dangling from the ceiling (looked
like Brown's Sheep). There may indeed be some Navajos still handspinning,
and even more remotely possible using traditional Churro fleece, but if
there are, I shudder to think what their rugs will be offered for.

Right you are. The price on a Navajo rug woven from Brown Sheep is high enough (not undeservedly.) Native American weavers who spin and dye their own rug wool do exist. I've met several at the state fair. Most of the ladies use a thigh spindle too. They eye the electric carder and the Louet wheels and ask where they can purchase such time saving tools. (They usually spin Churro X's around here.) But to the point, hand spinning and natural dyeing doubles the rug's price at a minimum.

Michelle
White Rock NM