Date   

surgery and countermarche looms

Jo Anne Ryeburn <ryeburn@...>
 

A friend is about to have a replacement hip put in - of the don't put weight on it for six weeks while bone gros around the pin variety. She also has arthritic knees. She is wondering how soon she will be able to crawl under her countermarche so she can tie it up.
I have a vague memory of a method of tying the lams and treadles of a countermarch to cords that are fastened in the back of the loom, where they can be manipulated in any way desired as far as making connections is concerned. Has anyone heard anything about such a method?

Jo Anne
--
Jo Anne Ryeburn ryeburn@sfu.ca


Tasara Center for Creative weaving

Laurie Autio <autio@...>
 

Sorry for the cross posting. Amanda Barrow of Boston is trying to set up some March talks in New England for Mr. Vasudevan from the Tasara Center for Creative (tapestry) weaving in southern India. For more information see the website:
www.tasaraindia.com

Amanda gave a talk for our guild on the center last month and it was fascinating.

For more information contact Amanda Barrow directly:
<abarrow@thecia.net>


Laurie Autio


Re: Gilmore tie-ups

Jim Stovall
 

bksnapa@aol.com writes:

I notice that raising four shafts is quite heavy even without a
warp on it.
So the next question is whether texsolv heddles in place of the
metal would
make much difference to ease of treadling.
I am not familiar with this loom so I am in purely theoretical territory
here, but I wonder if others could comment: since this is a jack loom,
and the heddle eyes will rest below the cloth plane when at rest, won't
the warp tension tend to counteract a little of the harness weight?

Don't forget to let physics of levers work for you. Place your foot as
far forward on the treadle as you can.

just FWIW on a thread that I confess I have not been following closely -
apologies if I am off-base with these comments.


Re: Coned yarns - weaving or knitting?

Susan A Poague <sapoague@...>
 

Hi -

I'd like to hear if anyone has used a knitting machine with fine gauge wire. I'm a complete knitting and knitting machine novice, but am interested in weaving and/or knitting with very fine gauge wire.

Thanks!
Susan Poague


Re: Subject: sizing handspun warps

Linda Boehm Burris <ljburris@...>
 

Holly, thanks for giving such good, detailed instructions on sizing yarn. I
don't write often but I read this forum with relish. So much information given
with such care and heart. You guys are great!

Linda


Re: Woven High Priest Breasplate

Yehudit Abrahams <gabraham@...>
 

Many of you may remember my weaving of the breastplate and my dilemma when
asked to do it much simpler than my research warranted. Well all is well
that ends well. Everyone loves it and most importantly, I am pleased.

My reason for writing is to tell you that between November 11 and November
14th at 6 or 7 o'clock in the evening, Chaim Richman, head of the project,
will be showing and discussing the High Priest Breastplate on Prime Time
Christian Broadcasting network. The name of the show is "Light of the
Southwest". For those of you in the Texas, Nevada, New Mexico area you
might be interested.

Yehudit Abrahams


Re: Digest Number 99

bksnapa@...
 

In a message dated 11/4/01 7:50:40 PM, WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com writes:

<< Perhaps you are aware that Gilmore looms were designed to be dressed from

F2B.....this is the reason on some models for the folding back beam. The

reed is sleyed and the back beam folded out of the way to make easy access

to the heddles for very comfortable threading. I once talked to Everett

Gilmore about some of the differences in his looms designs.....the oldest

designs were of his choosing and have the lift off breast and back beams,

mentioned, I think, by Judie....these were his favorite because he preferred

to warp back to front. When his wife began weaving, she preferred F2B to

prepare her looms, and thus was the folding back beam born. So it may

depend on the age and style of your loom as to which works best.

I own a Gilmore and a Loomcraft (essentially a Gilmore knock-off) and both

came with the snitch knot tie ups....I converted both to arrow pegs and

Texsolv cord and can do tie ups with relative ease and speed.....I still

have to climb under the loom, but the ties are accurate and secure, so I

only have to do so once. >>

Su,
Thank you for these explanations. It helps to understand how the loom is
intended to work. Sorry I missed thanking you in my earlier post. I subscribe
to the digest and so was overawed and excited by all the ideas that I didn't
reach the end of the list.

Barbara


Re: Gilmore tie-ups

bksnapa@...
 

Thank you Joanne, Ruth, Anne and Judie for all your most helpful suggestions.
I will immediately order texsolv tie-ups.

I have just checked out the loom with your all you other comments in mind.
It is a 40" 8-shaft with sectional beam made in 1989. It has a folding
X-frame. The breast beam and the back beam are at the ends of the X. The
breast beam is removable by unscrewing a bolt at each end - this makes access
to the treadles and heddles much easier. To get more distance between the
back beam and the shafts would be difficult as the the back beam is part of
the structure of the loom. But maybe......

I notice that raising four shafts is quite heavy even without a warp on it.
So the next question is whether texsolv heddles in place of the metal would
make much difference to ease of treadling.

I have just woven off the narrow warp that came with the loom on four shafts.
The weaving was very easy with a very generous shed, although I had trouble
adapting to a ratchet brake. I imagine I have to wait until I have all shafts
threaded before I find out about any problems with the shed. The narrow shed
that Nancy had trouble with might be related to the short back beam-to-shaft
distance (14").

I will be warping and threading on 8 shafts- with breast beam removed- and
tying up with texsolv cords as soon as they arrive. Your comments have saved
me a lot of grief and cut the "messing around" time needed to get to this
point.

Ruth, thank you for explaining the background to the design it provides a
good insight into its character.

Again thank you all so much for your help -

Barbara in Napa, CA


For UK fiber folk -- or neighbors

amyfibre@...
 

Hi all -- I am posting this since the original sender is not a member of WeaveTech. So, if you have questions/comments, please e-mail Margaret directly at:
mep@comp.leeds.ac.uk


Proposed Postal/Internet Guild of the UK Association of Guilds of Weavers, Spinners and Dyers

The UK Association of Guilds of Weavers, Spinners and Dyers is looking to establish a postal/internet based guild for those people with an interest in weaving, spinning or dyeing or other textile/fibre interests who through circumstance find themselves unable to partake in their local guild activities, or who hesitate to take up membership, yet would be interested in establishing a link with like-minded people.

Membership for both internet and postal members will bring the following benefits:
· a copy of the Association Journal, issued quarterly, at the reduced Guild rate
· member rates for all Association events, e.g. summer schools/conferences/study days etc.
· submission of work for selection to national/regional exhibitions
· ability to register and work towards the Certificate of Achievement
· the right to elect a UK based delegate and observer to represent the Guild at the Association AGM
· all other benefits afforded to local guild members.
· with permission, a membership list would be circulated to all.
· an occasional day or weekend event with a speaker, trade stands, demonstrations, to enable members to circulate and get to know each other, the venue changing as appropriate.

The guild will work within the parameters of the Association and have the same objectives, a committee being formed from its members.

An annual fee will cover the costs of the Affiliation fee to the Association, the cost of the Journal plus postage/packing/stationery

The Association wishes to assess the viability of this project and to this end seeks to determine what interest, if any, there would be in creating such a guild.

For the internet-based group, interchange of news/opinions/ideas/tips/queries will be by a list set up via Yahoo Groups.

Membership is not confined to UK residents, however it should be clearly understood that, once established, the guild will be affiliated to the Association.

If you are interested in this new and pioneering development please email Margaret Parker at mep@comp.leeds.ac.uk.

Margaret Parker
Webmaster, Association of Guilds of Weavers, Spinners and Dyers
www.wsd.org.uk


Re: Gilmore tie-ups

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

I notice that raising four shafts is quite heavy even without a warp on it.
So the next question is whether texsolv heddles in place of the metal would
make much difference to ease of treadling.
Yes it would make the treadling easier but it might start " floating" the
shafts, which would be a real pain in the shed ! If it's a Jack loom, heavy
shafts are normal, as usually only gravity holds down the lower part of the
shed.
Use candle wax or paraffin in the castle grooves ( if any ) and that'll
help; part of the effort is plain old friction.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: Using spools like cones

55wmt <55wmt@...>
 

Someone mentioned recently that one end of cardboard spools were torn off
to create "cones". How is the winding done - is a cone winder needed?
No cone winder needed. A bobbin winder (hand or electric) is all you need.
Just wind it so that you continue to build up the yarn on one end creating
the conical shape just like coned yarns.

Angie Rockett


Re: spool racks / endfeed packages

Melby, E.
 

The equipment for making endfeed packages could be the same as for making
normal spools.
Just think end-feed shuttle. Instead of spools with ends, use something
without that will fit in an electric winder. You make the end-feed shape
while winding. It works. Yes, an authomatic cone winder would be nice, but
you can wind quite fast as long as you have an electric winder with support
for both sides of the pirn, spool or whatever.

BTW there is a German contraption that might work as a conewinder. It is
meant for plying your own yarn for colormixing or creating novelty yarn. The
result is on one cone. It is not fast, but it works on its own.

Elisabeth

A Norwegian in the Netherlands


Re: very fine chenille

Su Butler <apbutler@...>
 

Does anyone know of a source for rayon chenille that is >MORE than 2000
ypp?

HI Terri...I see Janet has suggested Yarns Plus.....a good source......Also
available from Shel B. in Poughkipsee, NY, telephone number is 845-454-8836.
Last I checked he had 3000 ypp chenille in colors at very decent prices.

Su Butler :-) apbutler@ync.net
"The way to develop self-confidence is to do the thing you fear and get a
record of successful experiences behind you." - William Jennings Bryan


Re: Gilmore tie-ups

Su Butler <apbutler@...>
 

I found the long reach from the front beam to the heddles a
bit of a stretch for threading.
HI Barbara....I have seen a lot of replies to your post, including a mention
by Ruth of one from Joanne, which I have not yet seen, so perhaps this will
be repeated info....
Perhaps you are aware that Gilmore looms were designed to be dressed from
F2B.....this is the reason on some models for the folding back beam. The
reed is sleyed and the back beam folded out of the way to make easy access
to the heddles for very comfortable threading. I once talked to Everett
Gilmore about some of the differences in his looms designs.....the oldest
designs were of his choosing and have the lift off breast and back beams,
mentioned, I think, by Judie....these were his favorite because he preferred
to warp back to front. When his wife began weaving, she preferred F2B to
prepare her looms, and thus was the folding back beam born. So it may
depend on the age and style of your loom as to which works best.
I own a Gilmore and a Loomcraft (essentially a Gilmore knock-off) and both
came with the snitch knot tie ups....I converted both to arrow pegs and
Texsolv cord and can do tie ups with relative ease and speed.....I still
have to climb under the loom, but the ties are accurate and secure, so I
only have to do so once.
I read someone had problems with small shed on Gilmore looms, but I
suspect it was weaver error and not the loom...if you try to weave with
tension too high, the shed size decreases.....and if you don't have the
treadles tied to the proper height the shed size suffers as well......if you
can pass your shuttle cleanly through the shed, any more is waste.
I think you likely have a very good loom and simply need to use it a bit
to find the best ways to work for your body and tastes.

Su Butler :-) apbutler@ync.net
"The way to develop self-confidence is to do the thing you fear and get a
record of successful experiences behind you." - William Jennings Bryan


Re: Singles yarn for warp

ALLEN FANNIN <aafannin@...>
 

At 02:28 AM 11/3/01 +0000, JANET YANG <jyang949@home.com> wrote:


The Fall 2001 issue of Spin-Off has an article by Rita Buchanan in which she recommends plying yarn that is to be used as warp:

"I've had, and heard about, too many disasters with singles warps that frayed, fell apart, stuck together, or broke repeatedly...Tension and abrasion [from weaving] are sure to reveal every weak spot in the yarn."

At 07:02 AM 11/3/01 -0500, Ruth Blau <ruthblau@home.com>
wrote:

A plied yarn is always stronger than a single.

At 09:39 AM 11/3/01 -0500, Holly <holly@shaltzfarm.com>

wrote:

I found this statement by someone regarded as an authority on weaving
with handspun to be very unfortunate.

All of the above statements are a reflection of the "discussion" that has been going on in handspinning circles for as long as the 20th century revival in this craft has existed.

Unfortunately, hand spinners have much the same mind set as do handloom weavers in that there is a lack of solid technical knowlege of the physical principles of how yarn is made with reference to the mill technology where this knowledge has come to reside. There is no fundamental physical difference in a yarn that is a function of the source of power which spun it. Whether a yarn is spun by human power or spun with motor power, a yarn is a yarn, period. If a yarn is able to function as a warp yarn, the power used to spin it is totally irrelavent. During the early 60's and into the late early 80's, I personally spun hundreds of thousands of yards of singles yarn which was used for warp with no more difficulty than a yarn spun by non-human source of power.

It's saddens me that after nearly 40 years, this same discussion is still on going without the resolution that is within such easy grasp.

AAF











Mrs. Buchanan was referring to handspun yarn. But is single-ply, *mill-spun* yarn as difficult to use for warp? It seems to me that abrasion would be less of a problem with mill-spun singles because it would be more uniform.
Also, plying undoes some of the twist in the singles. Wouldn't the tighter twist of a singles yarn make it more resistent to tension and abrasion than if it were used to make a balanced, two-ply yarn?

Janet


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Allen Fannin, Adj. Prof., Textiles
Fashion & Design Technology Department
College of Visual and Performing Arts
215/224 Slocum Hall
Syracuse University
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Phone: (315) 443-1256 (direct)
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FAX: (315) 443-5300
e-Mail: <aafannin@syr.edu>


Re: very fine chenille

Margaret Thorson <thousandflower@...>
 

Keep watching ebay. I got some a month or so ago and the vendor offered
several other cones later on. I think the vendor was either Janice Vickers
at jvickers@rfci.net or Rebecca Johnson at jrv1@mindspring.com. Haven't
used it yet, will probably have to wait until after Christmas to get to it.

Margaret in the San Juan Islands

----------

From: Terri Tinkham <arachne@humboldt1.com>
To: WeaveTech@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [WeaveTech] very fine chenille
Date: Sun, Nov 4, 2001, 11:51 AM
Does anyone know of a source for rayon chenille that is LESS than 2000 ypp?
TIA
Terri


Re: Ancient Peruvian textiles

Brucie Connell <bruciec@...>
 

I will do some additional research (or maybe not - I am afraid my books are packed up right now. So maybe......

OK, I was able to find one titled Rediscovery of Pre-Columbian Textiles by Jacqueline and Marc de Bolle. And I was way wrong. Apparently my little scrap is not typical as in their catalogue section virtually every piece is described as having Z2S for both warp and weft (spun Z plied S). Many apologies!

Brucie


Tensioners....

Bill Koepp <bgkoe@...>
 

The tensioners that I obtained through Allen Fannin have worked very well,
the tension is adjustable from almost nothing to more than I need at this
time. The adjustments are easy and can be done while the warp or yarn is
running through the device. There's two ways to adjust the tension, either
by adding or subtracting steel washers, or by moving a lever on the device.
I've posted three photos on my site, the quality isn't great but they show a
tensioner with a warp entered.
http://www.angelfire.com/ca3/billk/images/tensioner.1.gif
http://www.angelfire.com/ca3/billk/images/tensioner.2.gif
http://www.angelfire.com/ca3/billk/images/tensioner.3.gif

Notes -
1. Shows the tensioner secured to a wood base, which is clamped to my
workbench and it's feeding my pirn winder. This is so I can move the device
about and get it out of harms way, when I'm thrashing about in the small
room with reeds,beams, etc. !
2. Shows the tensioner after I added a third eyelet, for guiding warp up
from a cone sitting below the workbench ( it's not normally needed ).
3. Shows one of the tensioner disks dismounted: on the left is the base felt
disk, next are two stainless steel polished convex plates, one fits over the
felt disk and the other is turned up,to hold the steel washer weights.
Finally on the right are three steel washer-weights.
The tensioner is a well designed unit and I recommend them to anyone, for
warping, cone or pirn winding.

Happy Shuttling ! - Bill Koepp in Central California


Re: Gilmore tie-ups

Judie Eatough
 

Since we have several Gilmore's in the weaving lab (along with Leclercs,
Schachts, Pendletons, and AVLs), some suggestions. The ones we have are
older looms without the lift off front and back beams and with the old
tie-ups.

1. These looms have good wide sheds unless the treadles are tied up
wrong. If the shed is narrow, the angle for the treadles is either too
high (most frequent) or too low. It should be about 45 degrees. This
gives the treadles a chance to move without hitting lams. So that
problem is fixable.

2. Comfort in threading -- well -- some things that help.
Putting the books or a box under the shafts to raise them help. Sitting
at the back of the loom to thread helps. The warp beam will come off
pretty easy on the ones we have.

Judie


Re: very fine chenille

Janet Stollnitz <jstoll@...>
 

At 02:54 PM 11/4/01,Terri wrote:
Sorry, I meant FINER than 2000 ypp!
A year or more ago Webs had some rayon chenille at 3000 yds/lb in just a few colors. In June at MAFA I purchased rayon chenille at 3000 yds/lb from Yarns Plus. They carry it only in white on cones.

Yarns Plus <http://www.yarnsplus.com>

Janet

_____________________________________________________________
Janet Stollnitz jstoll@cpcug.org
Silver Spring, MD
_____________________________________________________________