Copenhagen


heasoon arzberger <heasoonr@...>
 

At the end of this month I am planning to travel Copenhagen for a week. Could anyone suggest weaving/fiber related places that I must see in Copenhagen?
Thank you.
Heasoon


From: WeaveTech@...
Reply-To: WeaveTech@...
To: WeaveTech@...
Subject: [WeaveTech] Digest Number 173
Date: 15 Jan 2002 08:46:26 -0000

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There are 6 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Re: reeds (and cleaning rust???)
From: Joan Swift <joanes@...>
2. Re: Re: Weighted warp beam
From: fiberweaver@...
3. Re: Weighted warp beam
From: "jyang949" <jyang949@...>
4. Re: Weighted warp beam
From: Kathy Warner <kwarner@...>
5. Avl auto-advance update
From: "kregier2001" <kregier@...>
6. Re: Rust yreeds and bent dents
From: "marsha01222" <sha-mar@...>


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Message: 1
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 10:08:56 -0800 (PST)
From: Joan Swift <joanes@...>
Subject: Re: Re: reeds (and cleaning rust???)

A bent or damaged dent can leave a warpwise
line in your fabric (or rug)..that you might not even see as you are
weaving but when you roll it out off the loom there it is!!
Wouldn't that disappear after washing?

Joan



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Message: 2
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 13:33:11 -0500
From: fiberweaver@...
Subject: Re: Re: Weighted warp beam

When I had the class, we used barbell weights (obviously
come in all different sizes and a good use for that set you
have been tripping over). It has been several years, but if
I remember correctly, there are two hung off each side of
the beam w/a double wrap of the cords they are attached to.
The regular brake itself is disengaged.

She had a description of this in one of her articles she did
for Handwoven several years ago, but I believe no pictures.

Please refer to the article, cause I wouldn't want to steer
you wrong.

Carol


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Message: 3
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 18:48:27 -0000
From: "jyang949" <jyang949@...>
Subject: Re: Weighted warp beam

Peggy Osterkamp gives an illustrated explanation of weighted warp beams at
www.avlusa.com/newsletter/cybershuttle1/html/AutoWarpTensSys.html

In one of her books, she wrote that the large rock is ten times the weight of the small rock, and that the system works more smoothly if springs are substituted for one or both of the rocks. But you can't beat as hard if you replace both rocks with springs.

Janet



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Message: 4
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 11:02:30 -0800
From: Kathy Warner <kwarner@...>
Subject: Re: Weighted warp beam

Janet wrote:

What I mean is, weighting the beam seems to have more benefits than
just maintaining constant tension in the warp. Provided you match
the weight to the strength of your beat, the weighted beam should be
able to compensate for the occasional beat that is too forceful.
I wove briefly on a loom with a weighted warp beam once (too briefly
to get the hang of it, so what I learned was what you can do wrong.)
It was the box-of-rocks-on-the-end-of-a-stick type. It also had an
ancient form of automatic advance, so if you beat too hard the warp
advanced too much and you had to get up, go around and crank it back
again. Nuisance.

Eventually, I suppose, I would have got it, and the principle of the
thing is very sensible, but I don't think it's going to cover any
multitude of sins.

Kathy Warner (kwarner@...)


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Message: 5
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 22:30:20 -0000
From: "kregier2001" <kregier@...>
Subject: Avl auto-advance update

You may recall that I asked for help re: my AVL auto-advance. It was
not advancing consistently, causing shadows in the weaving. I had
wrangled with this problem a long time, and consistent bumper to
bumper beat, making sure the weight is up, and all the other advice
AVL and others gave me did not help. Then,Janice so kindly wrote:

<Hi Kathy,
I was having the same problem a few years ago when Tom, formerly of
AVL, sent me an email with great big letters, "CHANGE THE BUSHING!"
Referring to the brass bushing that the small gear goes through. (The
one that engages the larger gear on the front beam and connects to
the large sprocket piece on the outside of the loom.) I didn't think
it was old enough to be worn but apparently it was. When I got the
new one, I had a hard time telling the difference but it certainly
made the difference. That was a very inexpensive fix. I've also
changed the smaller gear itself on one loom. I found that the
front beam would rock somewhat when it shouldn't.

Janice>

My wonderful loom mechanic husband (I couldn't weave without him)
replaced the bushing, and took apart all the other moving parts and
cleaned them up and oiled them and put it all together again. What a
big difference!!! My old bearing does not look worn, either.

The repairs just passed the acid test- a 12 e.p.i., 2/2 twill with a
light warp and a dark weft. Any glitch in the beat, and the mistake
is so obvious, it jumps up and bites you on the nose! It is all
weaving beautifully.

The part is an oilite bushing, 5/8" X 3/4" with a flange X 1-1/8".
When ordering the part, keep those dimensions in order. AVL wanted
$9 and change plus postage for the part. I was able to get it at my
local industrial supply store for $1.71.

Thanks Janice and Tom for the help!

Weaving with a big smile on my face,
Kathy Regier






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Message: 6
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 22:36:56 -0000
From: "marsha01222" <sha-mar@...>
Subject: Re: Rust yreeds and bent dents

Thanks to everyone who shared advice on redeeming my rusty old
reeds.I will try some of these things when I have some time (a
precious commodity) to spend on the effort..and I will report back.
I want to mention also that I/we have found it neccessary to wash
very well brand new stainless steel reeds before using..with silk in
particular. There is someting in the silk that reacts with something
on the reeds that leaves dreadful gray streaks..we have to scrub well
with toothbrushes and detergent..and rinsing thoroughly but being
careful not to get the resin wet(is that what it is holding the
dents in place?) at the top and bottom.
In answer to wouldn't the flaw in the fabric (from the bent dent) go
away with washing..yes probably but not always..it depends on the
e.p.i and "stiffness" of the warp. Also I/we often weave yardage (30-
60 yds) on one bolt and send it directly to an upholsterer.so it
doesn't always get washed.
Marsha



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