Topics

Rail Gaps

emrldsky
 

I have been told that when gaping rails for isolation  that the left rail gap should be in line with the right rail gap. However, the documentation for the reversers, PSX-AR say that they should  be offset by 3/4 inch.

Why the difference? As I use Kato HO Unitrack, providing the offset requires much modification to track pieces.

I have not had problems with aligned gaps.

Peace,

Mike G.


Don Vollrath
 

This subject has been beaten to death several times in this and other forums. There is no real proof that the gaps need to be offset... other than caused by poor wiring practice. Just place both insulated rail joiners at convenient places. Where the continuing rails connect to a turnout is usually a great place to do that. No need to cut any gaps.
DonV 

whmvd
 

Hi Mike,

There's been a nearly endless discussion on this on either the NCE-DCC forum or the jmriusers one - don't remember which, sorry. The upshot of it was that there are two schools of thought, neither of which could convince the other. Also, and most importantly, nobody had any evidence of anything wrong with the other side's way of working - just lots of theories.

It seemed to me from all that that it didn't make a blind bit of difference, but you'll probably hear people fighting one of the corners here.

Wouter


On Sat, 11 May 2019 at 20:11, emrldsky <azMikeG@...> wrote:

I have been told that when gaping rails for isolation  that the left rail gap should be in line with the right rail gap. However, the documentation for the reversers, PSX-AR say that they should  be offset by 3/4 inch.

Why the difference? As I use Kato HO Unitrack, providing the offset requires much modification to track pieces.

I have not had problems with aligned gaps.

Peace,

Mike G.


Mark Gurries
 


There is no theory about how an autoreverser works.

If there is no technical analysis supporting how offset gaps are solving any problem, then wye would one want to go out of their way spending extra time and effort to create them?

Make is easy for yourself.

On May 11, 2019, at 1:58 PM, whmvd <vandoornw@...> wrote:

Hi Mike,

There's been a nearly endless discussion on this on either the NCE-DCC forum or the jmriusers one - don't remember which, sorry. The upshot of it was that there are two schools of thought, neither of which could convince the other. Also, and most importantly, nobody had any evidence of anything wrong with the other side's way of working - just lots of theories.

It seemed to me from all that that it didn't make a blind bit of difference, but you'll probably hear people fighting one of the corners here.

Wouter

On Sat, 11 May 2019 at 20:11, emrldsky <azMikeG@...> wrote:

I have been told that when gaping rails for isolation  that the left rail gap should be in line with the right rail gap. However, the documentation for the reversers, PSX-AR say that they should  be offset by 3/4 inch.

Why the difference? As I use Kato HO Unitrack, providing the offset requires much modification to track pieces.

I have not had problems with aligned gaps.

Peace,

Mike G.





Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Mark Gurries
 


Why I say No Theory, I mean there is no Magic.   It is a simple device.

On May 11, 2019, at 5:33 PM, Mark Gurries <gurriesm@...> wrote:


There is no theory about how an autoreverser works.

If there is no technical analysis supporting how offset gaps are solving any problem, then wye would one want to go out of their way spending extra time and effort to create them?

Make is easy for yourself.

On May 11, 2019, at 1:58 PM, whmvd <vandoornw@...> wrote:

Hi Mike,

There's been a nearly endless discussion on this on either the NCE-DCC forum or the jmriusers one - don't remember which, sorry. The upshot of it was that there are two schools of thought, neither of which could convince the other. Also, and most importantly, nobody had any evidence of anything wrong with the other side's way of working - just lots of theories.

It seemed to me from all that that it didn't make a blind bit of difference, but you'll probably hear people fighting one of the corners here.

Wouter

On Sat, 11 May 2019 at 20:11, emrldsky <azMikeG@...> wrote:

I have been told that when gaping rails for isolation  that the left rail gap should be in line with the right rail gap. However, the documentation for the reversers, PSX-AR say that they should  be offset by 3/4 inch.

Why the difference? As I use Kato HO Unitrack, providing the offset requires much modification to track pieces.

I have not had problems with aligned gaps.

Peace,

Mike G.





Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com




Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



John Johnston <towboatjohnston@...>
 

For what it’s worth, I have tried both ways in N scale, both with Atlas code 80 and PECO code 55. As Wouter aptly said, it didn’t make a blind bit of difference. 

John Johnston
(713) 240-1687
Sent from iPhone via gmail

On May 11, 2019, at 4:58 PM, whmvd <vandoornw@...> wrote:

Hi Mike,

There's been a nearly endless discussion on this on either the NCE-DCC forum or the jmriusers one - don't remember which, sorry. The upshot of it was that there are two schools of thought, neither of which could convince the other. Also, and most importantly, nobody had any evidence of anything wrong with the other side's way of working - just lots of theories.

It seemed to me from all that that it didn't make a blind bit of difference, but you'll probably hear people fighting one of the corners here.

Wouter

On Sat, 11 May 2019 at 20:11, emrldsky <azMikeG@...> wrote:

I have been told that when gaping rails for isolation  that the left rail gap should be in line with the right rail gap. However, the documentation for the reversers, PSX-AR say that they should  be offset by 3/4 inch.

Why the difference? As I use Kato HO Unitrack, providing the offset requires much modification to track pieces.

I have not had problems with aligned gaps.

Peace,

Mike G.