Topics

HELP needed

richard_clark@...
 

Hi All

I am also new to the group and still looking at DCC for my new large model 0 gauge railway in the garden. I have received much help from his forum but have a simple question raised to me by a friend with a conventionally wired layout. If I have a command station with 2 boosters attached to it so that I am no more than the advised 30' from them. If I have a short in any part of the layout how do I find it without being able to isolate like I could if I had conventional section switches.
I could not give an answer but their must be one. I understand only one of the boosters is likley to trip out leaving me with half the layout still running. But I remain unsure as to how I would locate the fault?
Can anyone help please. Just so you know I am going to be running on 10am boosters as I have some varied 0 gauge locomotives in my stud.

Cheers
Richard.

----- Original Message -----
From: wirefordcc
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Sunday, January 15, 2006 2:49 AM
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: HELP needed ..to select turnouts for DCC???


Chuck,

I'm not sure what you are looking for. The instructions for the
electrofrog are at: http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches_peco.htm#a2
The Peco electrofrog is basically DCC friendly. There isn't much you
have to do.

In your earlier posting, you asked about using manual turnout
control. That is covered at:
http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches.htm#a14 The approached covered
here works pretty good for our manual ground throws. We got a little
smarter since the phoots were taken. Be sure to heed the suggestion
that says run the grain of the top piece of wood lengthwise. This is
much stronger.





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Earl T. Hackett <hackete1@...>
 

Quite simply, you can't. I had the same problem, usually caused by a mistake in a modification to the wiring. I'm presently in the midst of installing DPDT cut out switches to break the booster sections into manageable segments to help in tracking down those pesky shorts. The DPDT switches are located on a panel mounted next to the occupancy detectors and the local booster.

----- Original Message -----
From: richard_clark@...
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Sunday, January 15, 2006 1:51 PM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Re: HELP needed


Hi All

If I have a short in any part of the layout how do I find it without being able to isolate like I could if I had conventional section switches.

Mark Gurries
 

----- Original Message -----
From: richard_clark@...
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Sunday, January 15, 2006 1:51 PM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Re: HELP needed


Hi All

If I have a short in any part of the layout how do I find it without
being able to isolate like I
could if I had conventional section switches.
Earl Hackett wrote:
Quite simply, you can't. I had the same problem, usually caused by a
mistake in a modification to the wiring. I'm presently in the midst of
installing DPDT cut out switches to break the booster sections into
manageable segments to help in tracking down those pesky shorts. The
DPDT switches arelocated on a panel mounted next to the occupancy
detectors and the local booster.

Earl is basically correct. This is also another argument for dividing
the layout in small power districts.


There are a few tricks to help you that work for me.

1) IF you hearing is good, you typically can hear the short with the
sound being strongest at the short itself if it on the track. This is
because the DCC power is AC power that runs approximately 4.5KHz to 9KHZ
range.

With NCE boosters, it cycles DCC power on and off attempting to
automatically reset itself. When it is on, you hear the buzz followed
by silence when it is off. So you have to be patient. Using my
directional sense of hearing...I usually can find the shorts quickly in
a quite room.

Shorts due to wiring do not make any noise which lead to solution #2.
Solution #2 also works on track power too.

2) The current flowing is very high...you can sometimes use a ANALOG
Volt meter set to AC mode and measure the voltage drops in your wiring.
It not the absolute voltage accuracy you are concerned about. It is the
relative readings. Was this Voltage reading less or more than the one
before? The closer you get to the short, the lower the voltage gets. I
say analog volt meter because it easier to read the peak magnitude of a
pulsing voltage. DVM reading are harder to read since they take to long
to stabilize.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
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