Topics

Lenz DCC, Power supply- length of run.

Peter Hall <starsearcher@...>
 

Hi All, 
                I move in 2 weeks.   My new bedroom will be 18ft X 18ft ( 5.5m x 5.5m,  NSW Australia).   What with the world events I'm at the planning stage.   I've got a few health issues so I'm on Lock down until such time as there is a Vaccine, long story.  I also have a brain aneurysm and epilepsy and all the joys that brings.   My life is like groundhog day without remembering anything from the previous day.   Yeah I get good support.   So the KISS method on everything.   I model primarily in On30.   I have  Lenz DC, one set 100, and an LV102.   Both power supplies being NCE P514s.  (5 amps-13.8V)  All Locos have sound.   Turnouts (points) will be Caboose Hobbies ground throws, tho it'll be more a scenery railway, 24 inch radius min.   Apart from Locos nothing else will be hooked onto DCC.   The only electric Turnouts will be in the lower storage yard, powered independently  along with signals.  All storage sidings will be insulated so no standing sounds, lights etc.   Basically control of 1 loco at a time,  and followed and driven around.  ( less is more)  It's more about what I can manage.    So I'd split the plan into 2 sections,  one with the LZV100 and the other with the LV102.  Circuit breakers and feeders to each section of track etc.   It would allow for 2 running Loco sets if someone else joined in.   I would like to know how long a run can each power supply manage?   Would getting other more powerful power supplies make any difference to that?  One basic plan is single track, basically in a windy circle however I also wondered if I could figure 8 it( Inverted?)  Tho this would mean 4 sections,  whether I could double the Bus lines,  one feeding the bottom, one feeding the top.   Locos, magnets, reed switches and relays so that power is switched from the bottom to the top?   The power supplies etc would be centered in the plan and bus lines extending from that central point to about 30 ft each way.   I know it sounds like I want the cheapskate method, but Lenz has become very expensive, because people want more control options.   I'm still on Version 3.5 because I just wanted simple operation.  If I had to buy more LV102s  realistically maybe I'm better off to look at something like MRC DCC which is somewhat cheaper, tho again I wouldn't use/need all the added functions.   Any help would be gratefully appreciated.   Thank you.
.

Mark Gurries
 


On Apr 16, 2020, at 3:22 AM, Peter Hall via groups.io <starsearcher@...> wrote:

Hi All, 
                 I have  Lenz DC, one set 100, and an LV102.   Both power supplies being NCE P514s.  (5 amps-13.8V)  All Locos have sound.    So I'd split the plan into 2 sections,  one with the LZV100 and the other with the LV102.   I would like to know how long a run can each power supply manage?   Would getting other more powerful power supplies make any difference to that? 


One basic plan is single track,...  Tho this would mean 4 sections,  whether I could double the Bus lines,  one feeding the bottom, one feeding the top.    The power supplies etc would be centered in the plan and bus lines extending from that central point to about 30 ft each way.   I know it sounds like I want the cheapskate method, but Lenz has become very expensive, because people want more control options.  

The length of the wire between the DC/AC power supply (P514) to the Booster/Command Station input is not critical.  Just use heavy gauge wires like 14AWG or better.  Nothing special otherwise needs to be done.

The track bus wire runs lengths are more critical.  30Ft approaches the track bus limit of what you can do with needing to add RC filters to the track.

If you want to save money, place the boosters and the power supply together in the central center location relative to the length of the layout.  Hence the power supply lead included with the P514 would not need to be extended, and the track bus wire runs will be reduces to TWO 15 foot runs going in opposite directions.  (Same amount of wire but cuts the length of the track bus in half).  Centralize the DCC circuit breaker next to the boosters and run a track bus run for each Circuit break output to the section of track it will be responsible for.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com