Topics

Wire Connectors

Puckdropper
 

I'm working on wiring up a signal system, and am dealing with about 100 wire connections to make.  I'd like to trade some money for time savings if I can, it will take me quite a while to strip and solder those wires.  The signals have loose wires, approximately 24 ga with one using 32 ga wire and the wires to the signals are 4-wire satin phone cable. 

I'd like to keep the giant terminal strips out of this.  Those 8-position wire-under-screw type are usually 6" long or better, which is horribly oversize. 

Any suggestions for a good connector to use?  I don't mind crimping phone connectors on, but the problem is how do I connect the phone connector to the signal?

In at least one case, the wire will need to be removable.

Puckdropper

Gregory Latiak
 

I share your pain. I have been looking through the Digikey catalog at board edge wire connectors -- like the units Digitrax uses on their TSMK adapter. My local electronics shop just carries ones for larger wires -- too big to use with the little magnet wires from my signals. And I am NOT soldering this stuff...

My plan, when I pick out the right connectors, is to solder these to a little PC board with a corresponding one for the cable to the signal controller -- in my case SIGM20s. I also tried punching them into ethernet sockets but the wires are too small.

Another one of those annoying areas where I am surprised that there are no OTS commercial solutions but that everyone is forced to roll their own.

greg latiak
BQR

Glenn
 


Don't run off. Go to you electronics source and purchase terminal strips with screws. Yes one side is foe soldering, however there is nothing saying you cannot put two wires under one screw.

Look at digikey.com part number 36-4181-ND as an example. These can be found in many sizes.

These things can often be found on the back of electronics stuff to connect speakers.

Glenn

Puckdropper
 

http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/avx-corporation/009276004021106/478-6171-1-ND/2346156

http://www.digikey.com/products/en?keywords=277-2076-1-ND

I found a couple spring-loaded terminals that accept wire as small as 26 ga.  I'll just have to REconnect AGAIN (sorry, I'm a little frustrated with that--the wire is finer than my finest stripper) little leads on that one signal and can make my terminal blocks with these.

Don't be afraid of surface mount, the only thing that's changed is that you don't have to drill holes first.  You could connect wire across the connectors or scratch yourself out a board.

I'm probably going to make a board, but I can't say for sure it'll work until I get the parts.  I've got a mill that can handle the fine tolerance, it's just a matter of feeding it fine enough bits at a slow enough speed to make things happen.  Those fine bits will break if you look at them wrong.

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., <ghazel@...> wrote :


Don't run off. Go to you electronics source and purchase terminal strips with screws. Yes one side is foe soldering, however there is nothing saying you cannot put two wires under one screw.

Look at digikey.com part number 36-4181-ND as an example. These can be found in many sizes.

These things can often be found on the back of electronics stuff to connect speakers.

Glenn

dvollrath@...
 

Use fine sand paper or emery cloth to rub off the insulating varnish on fine wires held to a piece of wood. Heat from a soldering iron may also work. Try using a small amount of flux and tinning the wires.

Spring loaded or other terminal strips with internal clamp devices don't work well to join two wires of different diameters. The larger diameter wire takes up the space and the smaller wire is still loose.

DonV




---In WiringForDCC@..., <puckdropper@...> wrote :

http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/avx-corporation/009276004021106/478-6171-1-ND/2346156

http://www.digikey.com/products/en?keywords=277-2076-1-ND

I found a couple spring-loaded terminals that accept wire as small as 26 ga.  I'll just have to REconnect AGAIN (sorry, I'm a little frustrated with that--the wire is finer than my finest stripper) little leads on that one signal and can make my terminal blocks with these.

Don't be afraid of surface mount, the only thing that's changed is that you don't have to drill holes first.  You could connect wire across the connectors or scratch yourself out a board.

I'm probably going to make a board, but I can't say for sure it'll work until I get the parts.  I've got a mill that can handle the fine tolerance, it's just a matter of feeding it fine enough bits at a slow enough speed to make things happen.  Those fine bits will break if you look at them wrong.

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., <ghazel@...> wrote :


Don't run off. Go to you electronics source and purchase terminal strips with screws. Yes one side is foe soldering, however there is nothing saying you cannot put two wires under one screw.

Look at digikey.com part number 36-4181-ND as an example. These can be found in many sizes.

These things can often be found on the back of electronics stuff to connect speakers.

Glenn

Blair & Rasa
 

Don

A match will also work for taking the red-orange varnish off magnet wire, if that's what we're dealing with here.  Agreed about the spring-loaded terminals, they're a trap. 

Blair


On 17/02/19 15:27, dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:

Use fine sand paper or emery cloth to rub off the insulating varnish on fine wires held to a piece of wood. Heat from a soldering iron may also work. Try using a small amount of flux and tinning the wires.

Spring loaded or other terminal strips with internal clamp devices don't work well to join two wires of different diameters. The larger diameter wire takes up the space and the smaller wire is still loose.

DonV




---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/avx-corporation/009276004021106/478-6171-1-ND/2346156

http://www.digikey.com/products/en?keywords=277-2076-1-ND

I found a couple spring-loaded terminals that accept wire as small as 26 ga.  I'll just have to REconnect AGAIN (sorry, I'm a little frustrated with that--the wire is finer than my finest stripper) little leads on that one signal and can make my terminal blocks with these.

Don't be afraid of surface mount, the only thing that's changed is that you don't have to drill holes first.  You could connect wire across the connectors or scratch yourself out a board.

I'm probably going to make a board, but I can't say for sure it'll work until I get the parts.  I've got a mill that can handle the fine tolerance, it's just a matter of feeding it fine enough bits at a slow enough speed to make things happen.  Those fine bits will break if you look at them wrong.

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., wrote :


Don't run off. Go to you electronics source and purchase terminal strips with screws. Yes one side is foe soldering, however there is nothing saying you cannot put two wires under one screw.

Look at digikey.com part number 36-4181-ND as an example. These can be found in many sizes.

These things can often be found on the back of electronics stuff to connect speakers.

Glenn

Puckdropper
 

Unfortunately, that's not what I'm dealing with.  I've had great success with a solder pot or really big soldering iron (you want to be able to encapsulate the wire with solder) for stripping magnet wire, but Tomar used a really fine traditionally insulated wire on the signals.  It's finer than my 30 ga strippers will strip easily.  I'm not sure if the solder pot will handle that traditionally insulated wire without big nasty smells.

Good point on the spring-loaded terminals.  They are a trap, that's how they work. :-)  I had planned on one wire to a terminal, as that's all I need.

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., <smithbr@...> wrote :

Don

A match will also work for taking the red-orange varnish off magnet wire, if that's what we're dealing with here.  Agreed about the spring-loaded terminals, they're a trap. 

Blair


On 17/02/19 15:27, dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:

Use fine sand paper or emery cloth to rub off the insulating varnish on fine wires held to a piece of wood. Heat from a soldering iron may also work. Try using a small amount of flux and tinning the wires.

Spring loaded or other terminal strips with internal clamp devices don't work well to join two wires of different diameters. The larger diameter wire takes up the space and the smaller wire is still loose.

DonV


Puckdropper
 

So I was thinking... What is a thermal wire stripper but something that gets really hot and melts a bit of insulation?  So, I took some Nichrome wire and ran it over a hole drilled in a piece of wood and looped it so the wire touches the Nichrome in two places at once.  I hooked that up to a power supply and voila! instant thermal stripper using parts I had laying around.

It worked great, but I only tested down to 28 gauge or so decoder wire.  I didn't have that really fine wire available, as it's down at the club.

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., <puckdropper@...> wrote :

Unfortunately, that's not what I'm dealing with.  I've had great success with a solder pot or really big soldering iron (you want to be able to encapsulate the wire with solder) for stripping magnet wire, but Tomar used a really fine traditionally insulated wire on the signals.  It's finer than my 30 ga strippers will strip easily.  I'm not sure if the solder pot will handle that traditionally insulated wire without big nasty smells.

Good point on the spring-loaded terminals.  They are a trap, that's how they work. :-)  I had planned on one wire to a terminal, as that's all I need.

Puckdropper


Gregory Latiak
 

I have almost decided that IDC connectors were the right thing for my Tomar signals. Still might end up using RJ45 punch blocks for the wires themselves -- as in my layout the signals are close to being in pairs. Just push the wires in with my tool, snap in the connector to the control board. 

I have a couple of semaphores from them as well where the connections to the LED are basically magnet wire -- but because of the alignment needs of the servos, I was going to make up a mounting block and solder the wires to a local board with the other servo signals.

greg latiak

Glenn
 

When I was working with the enameled wire I wrapped it with "Flex-i grit" sand paper to remove the enamel then wiped the end with real nail polish remover (acetone).

Look up K & S Engineering Flex-I-Grit on ebay. sorry I could not find it otherwise quickly. There is also a K & S Engineering Flex-I-File. Either is a super thin flexible fine grit sandpaper.

It is used by model car builder to smooth fillers.

Glenn


rmvelten@...
 

Has anyone else ever used the 2, 3 and 4 wire IDC Telephone Data Splice Connectors?  You don't have to strip the wires to use these - merely insert the wires until they stop, then used ordinary pliers to squeeze the button down.  The inside of the connector is filled with silicone.  They are designed for AWG 22 - 26 wire.  I got my first one when the ATT guy left a box after a service call.  They are not removable - you just cut them off and throw away, but you lose about 1/2" of wire trapped in the connector.

I found them on ebay for about $10 for a package of 100 connectors.  Here is an example - I am not associated with this seller in any way:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Wire-IDC-Telephone-Data-Splice-Connector-100-Pack-/351671261113?hash=item51e13d97b9:g:JzkAAOxyRHdRy6Dk

Rich Velten in Missouri

Blair & Rasa
 

Rich

I've used these before, for indoors and outdoors connections:

http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G17981B

Goldmine always has an entertaining, eclectic variety of surplus stuff.  I can always make up a worthwhile order.

Blair

 


On 17/02/20 23:50, rmvelten@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
Has anyone else ever used the 2, 3 and 4 wire IDC Telephone Data Splice Connectors?  You don't have to strip the wires to use these - merely insert the wires until they stop, then used ordinary pliers to squeeze the button down.  The inside of the connector is filled with silicone.  They are designed for AWG 22 - 26 wire.  I got my first one when the ATT guy left a box after a service call.  They are not removable - you just cut them off and throw away, but you lose about 1/2" of wire trapped in the connector.

I found them on ebay for about $10 for a package of 100 connectors.  Here is an example - I am not associated with this seller in any way:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Wire-IDC-Telephone-Data-Splice-Connector-100-Pack-/351671261113?hash=item51e13d97b9:g:JzkAAOxyRHdRy6Dk

Rich Velten in Missouri

Puckdropper
 

I've used them and they do work well.  I used them on my Aunt's garage door, which is still operating just fine.

If it wasn't for the removable requirement, I'd be looking at using them.  We're going to be pulling a couple of those signals for scenery work.  (I've learned you can "be really careful" for about 2 minutes, then you inevitably forget about the thing and hit it or drip paint or something.  Removing it is the easiest way to prevent damage.)

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., <rmvelten@...> wrote :

Has anyone else ever used the 2, 3 and 4 wire IDC Telephone Data Splice Connectors?  You don't have to strip the wires to use these - merely insert the wires until they stop, then used ordinary pliers to squeeze the button down.  The inside of the connector is filled with silicone.  They are designed for AWG 22 - 26 wire.  I got my first one when the ATT guy left a box after a service call.  They are not removable - you just cut them off and throw away, but you lose about 1/2" of wire trapped in the connector.

I found them on ebay for about $10 for a package of 100 connectors.  Here is an example - I am not associated with this seller in any way:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Wire-IDC-Telephone-Data-Splice-Connector-100-Pack-/351671261113?hash=item51e13d97b9:g:JzkAAOxyRHdRy6Dk

Rich Velten in Missouri

john
 

Hello,
   I worked for the "Phone Company" for many years and for AT&T for many more. The connectors you are talking of are excellent but they have some problems. There are a number of different connectors and an unusual one allows one to tap and connect to a wire without cutting it. The connectors are available for a number of wire gages. They each accept a range of gages. They connect signal wires very well and current carrying capability is compatible with the wire size of the connector.
   At 10 cents a connector they are reasonably priced but sometimes they are available for less, look around.
   Now the problems. Avoid the filled connectors. The grease will leak, sometimes slowly, sometimes quickly. The grease will attract and collect dirt and dust. Much more dust than you think is around. Another problem is their bulkiness. While they seem tiny they accumulate bulk quickly. Connecting different gage wire will probably be best accomplished by stripping and soldering but the connectors will help with some of it.
   Hope I helped.
john
  


On Tuesday, February 21, 2017 12:40 PM, "puckdropper@... [WiringForDCC]" wrote:




I've used them and they do work well.  I used them on my Aunt's garage door, which is still operating just fine.

If it wasn't for the removable requirement, I'd be looking at using them.  We're going to be pulling a couple of those signals for scenery work.  (I've learned you can "be really careful" for about 2 minutes, then you inevitably forget about the thing and hit it or drip paint or something.  Removing it is the easiest way to prevent damage.)

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., wrote :

Has anyone else ever used the 2, 3 and 4 wire IDC Telephone Data Splice Connectors?  You don't have to strip the wires to use these - merely insert the wires until they stop, then used ordinary pliers to squeeze the button down.  The inside of the connector is filled with silicone.  They are designed for AWG 22 - 26 wire.  I got my first one when the ATT guy left a box after a service call.  They are not removable - you just cut them off and throw away, but you lose about 1/2" of wire trapped in the connector.

I found them on ebay for about $10 for a package of 100 connectors.  Here is an example - I am not associated with this seller in any way:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Wire-IDC-Telephone-Data-Splice-Connector-100-Pack-/351671261113?hash=item51e13d97b9:g:JzkAAOxyRHdRy6Dk

Rich Velten in Missouri




Doug Harris <digbee@...>
 

On 22/02/2017 06:03, Blair & Rasa smithbr@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
Rich
I've used these before, for indoors and outdoors connections:
http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G17981B
Goldmine always has an entertaining, eclectic variety of surplus stuff.
I can always make up a worthwhile order.
Blair

Eclectic, indeed! I've never seen anything like it!


--
Cheers.


Doug Harris
Cambridge, New Zealand

Blair & Rasa
 

Doug

Biggest downside is, just about everything comes and goes. Those connectors are one of the few items that they've always had, for the last six years anyway. Couple of times, I've ordered one or two of something that intrigued me, only to decide I wanted more - but they no longer had them, so I had to find them full-retail instead.

Another entertaining one is bgmicro.com, though he doesn't seem to be quite so...adventurous. Great supplies for electronics types, though.

Blair

On 17/02/21 17:05, Doug Harris digbee@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
On 22/02/2017 06:03, Blair & Rasa smithbr@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
Rich
I've used these before, for indoors and outdoors connections:
http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G17981B
Goldmine always has an entertaining, eclectic variety of surplus stuff.
I can always make up a worthwhile order.
Blair
Eclectic, indeed! I've never seen anything like it!

Doug Harris <digbee@...>
 

On 23/02/2017 02:57, Blair & Rasa smithbr@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
Doug
Another entertaining one is bgmicro.com, though he doesn't seem to be
quite so...adventurous. Great supplies for electronics types, though.
Blair

Many Thanks, Blair.


Too many items to look through - a dedicated search is obviously indicated!


--
Cheers.


Doug Harris
Cambridge, New Zealand

Max Maginness
 

More staid(!) but a reliable source  http://www.allelectronics.com/

 

Max

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 5:57 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Re: Wire Connectors

 

 

Doug

Biggest downside is, just about everything comes and goes. Those
connectors are one of the few items that they've always had, for the
last six years anyway. Couple of times, I've ordered one or two of
something that intrigued me, only to decide I wanted more - but they no
longer had them, so I had to find them full-retail instead.

Another entertaining one is bgmicro.com, though he doesn't seem to be
quite so...adventurous. Great supplies for electronics types, though.

Blair

On 17/02/21 17:05, Doug Harris digbee@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
> On 22/02/2017 06:03, Blair & Rasa smithbr@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
>> Rich
>> I've used these before, for indoors and outdoors connections:
>> http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G17981B
>> Goldmine always has an entertaining, eclectic variety of surplus stuff.
>> I can always make up a worthwhile order.
>> Blair
>
> Eclectic, indeed! I've never seen anything like it!
>
>