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Understanding the Atlas Turnout Diagram

ryenpreston@...
 

I have reviewed and studied the Atlas turnout diagram and am still somewhat confused about the option 1 and option 2 bonds; I use Atlas Custom line turnouts.

 

1)      Option one bonds, “Run a wire from each point rail to the corresponding bus wire as shown in the color above.”

The bonds seem to be running from stock rail to closure rail in this picture, not to any kind of bus wire. Will I be okay to leave this bond off since the point rails do touch the stock rails?

 

2)      Option 2 bonds, “Run a wire from each stock rail to the corresponding bus wire as shown in the color above.”

This bond is running from the point rails to the closure rails? Do I really need this bond since they are connected by the hinge rivet? Again this bond doesn’t seem to be running to any kind of bus wire.

 

**NOTE: I have not any experience with wiring, electricity, or soldering; I will be attempting all this for the first time. This is why I ask if I “really need” this or that connection.

 

Another question I have is: I have a small wye turnout in my layout that leads to a spur; it has two holes in the frog for the screw to be inserted into a bus bar to power the frog ( the other turnouts only have one screw hole.) Why is this? Which hole do I choose on the wye to power this turnout?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

Blair & Rasa
 

Ryen

I presume this is the drawing you're referring to:

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches_atlas_roco.htm

If so, note my edits below.

... The option 1 bonds run to the corresponding bus wire {via the appropriate stock rail} as shown in the color above.

... The option 2 bonds run to the corresponding bus wire {via the appropriate stock rail} as shown in the color above.

The connection to the relevant bus is via the wires shown on the right hand side of the drawing, which are NOT optional.


What is not mentioned is that the frog rails to the right of the frog are implicitly wired to the appropriate bus wire, usually by

the use of metal rail joiners to the next section of track. If you err and use insulating joiners, these two rails will also require

jumpers, as they must be powered somehow.


I have no experience with the Atlas Wye you mention, so hopefully someone else can help you there.

Hope this helps.

Blair Smith

Dale Gloer
 

Ryen,

Blair has given a good description of how to read the diagram.  MY only additional comment is that you should never depend on contact between point rails and stock (Closure) rails or to the hinge points (rivets on your switches) for electrical continuity.  Over time corrosion and dust and dirt accumulation due to age and scenery installation, etc will cause those contact points to fail electrically leaving you with dead track in your switches.  You can avoid this frustration by installing all the connections shown in the diagram.

Dale Gloer

John White
 

I've looked at the diagram several times and thinking it don't apply to my Atlas turnouts. All my turnouts are old school Atlas from an old school DC layout. Snap switches. I guess what I think is, that the frogs are the plastic, so no way to power them other then the rail itself. So, with the frog being plastic am I to assume that it will not work with this type of turnout, or am I mistaken? I have to deal with them shorting out when some of my engines and some rolling stock pass over the junction at the point of the frog.

John White
 

I also should mention that I did purchase the Busbars from Atlas and
after receiving them contacted Atlas about them and was told they won't
work with my type of Atlas turnouts.
JT White
____________________________________________________________
Do This Before Bed Tonight to Burn Belly Flab All Night Long
Flat Belly Protacol
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/58036f93891776f932d91st04duc

Paul O
 

jtw37, (name please),

look in the ‘Photos’ section at “insulfrog1”; it shows the shorting problem with this type of turnout.

Cutting the gap is one fix. Another way is to use a cutting disc and widen the gap where the two point rails come together.

A third, ‘temporary’, quick fix is a dab of fingernail polish at the shorting point; works until it wears off.

 

Paul O

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, October 16, 2016 8:12 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Understanding the Atlas Turnout Diagram

 

 

I've looked at the diagram several times and thinking it don't apply to my Atlas turnouts. All my turnouts are old school Atlas from an old school DC layout. Snap switches. I guess what I think is, that the frogs are the plastic, so no way to power them other then the rail itself. So, with the frog being plastic am I to assume that it will not work with this type of turnout, or am I mistaken? I have to deal with them shorting out when some of my engines and some rolling stock pass over the junction at the point of the frog.

John White
 

Sorry about the name thing. It comes from working on the railroad and our call tag. So the JT stuck all those years up to and including today. But the Name here Is John White.

Thanks for turning on the light bulb for me. I have did the saw since reading your reply and am going for the cut off wheel next. Thanks.
John White.