Topics

Common Metric Wire Sizes

wirefordcc
 

European Modelers:

We recently had lively discussion on converting AWG wire sizes to metric sizes.  Discussions like this are hints that I need to add something to my website.  What I want to add to my website is a table of common AWG sizes to common metric sizes.  So I surfed the Internet to try to find those.  I put the table in my website at:


http://www.WiringForDCC.com/track.htm#a29


Can someone who is familiar with purchasing metric wire sizes confirm that I have them right?


Thank you

Allan Gartner

Wiring For DCC

Doc Colin <colinseggie@...>
 


Hi Allan,
Yip you are correct. But I would stick to two decimal places for consistancy sake, and head that column " Cross Sectional Area in mm2"
AND also include a column "Diameter mm"  [who's going to measure x-sectional area??]
 AWG 10 -  2.59
          12 -  2.05
          14 -  1.63
          16 -  1.29
          18 -  1.02
          20 -  0.81
          22 -  0.65
          24 -  0.51
          26 -  0.40  
My 1cent  ~:>)
Doc Colin
 

----- Original Message -----
From: bigboy@...
Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 5:18 PM
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Common Metric Wire Sizes

 

European Modelers:

We recently had lively discussion on converting AWG wire sizes to metric sizes.  Discussions like this are hints that I need to add something to my website.  What I want to add to my website is a table of common AWG sizes to common metric sizes.  So I surfed the Internet to try to find those.  I put the table in my website at:


http://www.WiringForDCC.com/track.htm#a29


Can someone who is familiar with purchasing metric wire sizes confirm that I have them right?


Thank you

Allan Gartner

Wiring For DCC

dvollrath@...
 

Allan, you have 'equivalent' tables in several places on your site. But see http://myelectrical.com/notes/entryid/166/standard-cable-wire-sizes for a view from the other direction.

The standard is IEC 60228. None of the sizes are directly the same as AWG. However close enough for MRR purposes. Would be interesting to see what sizes and markings are actually in the local metric country home builder/hardware store.

DonV

jazzmanlj
 

Hi Allan,

There are many charts/calculators available.

https://www.superioressex.com/magnetwire_support/default.htm

Also from Essex wire great tables for all you need to know.

https://www.superioressex.com/uploadedFiles/Magnet_Wire_and_Distribution/North_America/Magnet_Wire_-_Winding_Wire/EngData_book_linked.pdf

Combine this with my precious posted link as to resistivity of metals,

http://www.allmeasures.com/formulae/static/formulae/electrical_resistivity/12.htm

This should cover all. Do not confuse magnet wire wit standard AWG. It is one and the same.

 

Len Jaskiewicz

 


 

jazzmanlj
 

Doc,

It boils down to how accurately you want to calculate the power loss and voltage drop! A resolution of 3 decimal places is common practice in engineering.

Len Jaskiewicz

Yip you are correct. But I would stick to two decimal places for consistancy sake, and head that column " Cross Sectional Area in mm2"
AND also include a column "Diameter mm" [who's going to measure x-sectional area??]
AWG 10 - 2.59
12 - 2.05
14 - 1.63
16 - 1.29
18 - 1.02
20 - 0.81
22 - 0.65
24 - 0.51
26 - 0.40
My 1cent ~:>)
Doc Colin

dvollrath@...
 

Allan,

Common metric wire sizes (those found in local UK stores) are marked as 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2.5, 4, 6, & 10 sq mm (in area). these sizes are not directly the same as any commonly found AWG sizes. However, if substituted for AWG 20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 10 or 8 (in order), the mm size tends to be about 15-20% greater in conduction area. So for model railroading use 1mm^2 instead of #18AWG, 1.5mm^2 instead of #16, 2.5mm^2 instead of #14, 4mm^2 instead of #12 and 6mm^2 instead of #10 and you are good to go. The 0.75mm^2 size looks like a good substitute for #20 track droppers.

DonV   

wirefordcc
 

Thanks!  Guys!  That's what I needed.


Allan


Flash Gordon
 

Allan,

Let us know when you have the new page up.

Ed S

colinseggie@...
 

Hi Allan.
Don't forget an addendum page of stores selling 3 decimal place vernier calipers!   ~:>)  No offence ment Les, just playing Trains!
Doc Colin

jazzmanlj
 

Hey Doc,

FYI, my digital calipers at work and cheapies at home read 4 decimals!

Len Jaskiewicz

Hi Allan.
Don't forget an addendum page of stores selling 3 decimal place vernier calipers! ~:>) No offence ment Les, just playing Trains!
Doc Colin

colinseggie@...
 

You are absolutely right Len. I forgot about my science days and the 3 decimal places rule, but just pulling your leg and adding some humor :>)
Doc Colin

wirefordcc
 

This is for modelers needing metric wire sizes.  I have revamped the charts for metric wires.

 For feeders, go to:  http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#a14

For bus wires, go to::  http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#a26

if you want a detailed chart of US and metric wires for general use, go to:  http://www.wiringfordcc.com/wire_sizes.pdf


This is for those that have been involved with the recent discussions of metric wire.  After our discussions earlier in the week, I continued to surf the web and think about how to present information on US and metric wire that was simple.  I didn't want the typical non-US modeler to have buy a wire gauge or a caliper to measure wire. I wanted something just as simple for the non-US modeler as it is for the US modeler.  The complicating factor is that there is not a one-for-one metric equivalent to US wire sizes.  It took me a week, but I think I achieved my goal.  The end result is that it is so subtle, the casual reader won't notice I made a change.  Any new modeler visiting my site won't know notice there was ever a problem and will know which wire they need to buy.


Enjoy!


Allan Gartner

Wiring For DCC

Doc Colin <colinseggie@...>
 


 Hi Allan,
 Very good and succinct. No short term headaches/expense there!
Well done!
 Doc Colin

----- Original Message -----
From: bigboy@...
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2014 9:07 PM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Re: Common Metric Wire Sizes

 

This is for modelers needing metric wire sizes.  I have revamped the charts for metric wires.

 For feeders, go to:  http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#a14

For bus wires, go to::  http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#a26

if you want a detailed chart of US and metric wires for general use, go to:  http://www.wiringfordcc.com/wire_sizes.pdf


This is for those that have been involved with the recent discussions of metric wire.  After our discussions earlier in the week, I continued to surf the web and think about how to present information on US and metric wire that was simple.  I didn't want the typical non-US modeler to have buy a wire gauge or a caliper to measure wire. I wanted something just as simple for the non-US modeler as it is for the US modeler.  The complicating factor is that there is not a one-for-one metric equivalent to US wire sizes.  It took me a week, but I think I achieved my goal.  The end result is that it is so subtle, the casual reader won't notice I made a change.  Any new modeler visiting my site won't know notice there was ever a problem and will know which wire they need to buy.


Enjoy!


Allan Gartner

Wiring For DCC

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

The table additions are great. Although the big one is a little over the top even for the rivet counters.

DonV

On Apr 19, 2014, at 2:08 PM, "bigboy@...<mailto:bigboy@...>" <bigboy@...<mailto:bigboy@...>> wrote:




This is for modelers needing metric wire sizes. I have revamped the charts for metric wires.

For feeders, go to: http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#a14

For bus wires, go to:: http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#a26

if you want a detailed chart of US and metric wires for general use, go to: http://www.wiringfordcc.com/wire_sizes.pdf


This is for those that have been involved with the recent discussions of metric wire. After our discussions earlier in the week, I continued to surf the web and think about how to present information on US and metric wire that was simple. I didn't want the typical non-US modeler to have buy a wire gauge or a caliper to measure wire. I wanted something just as simple for the non-US modeler as it is for the US modeler. The complicating factor is that there is not a one-for-one metric equivalent to US wire sizes. It took me a week, but I think I achieved my goal. The end result is that it is so subtle, the casual reader won't notice I made a change. Any new modeler visiting my site won't know notice there was ever a problem and will know which wire they need to buy.


Enjoy!


Allan Gartner

Wiring For DCC

jazzmanlj
 

Hi Allan,

Just a comment about your comparison of solid vs. stranded wire; skin effect and AC resistance.

In general for frequencies under 100kHz, skin effect should be negated as it's so miniscule. Stranded wire does not really reduce scin effect as the conductors are uninsulated, so the model is that of a solid conductor. Litz wire does reduce skin effect as it's multiple strands of insulated magnet wire twisted. The size of the strands are optimized for frequency ranges, generally starting near 1MHz and above.

AC resistance is another subject that does get quite technical. It comes into play in 'high power' high frequency systems.  Under 100kHz it should not even be mentioned to the general modeler.

Regards,

Len Jaskiewicz