Topics

Emergency stop button -- IMHO

Glenn
 

Do you really need a specialized emergency shut off?

 

I have a friend who has a 12x12 On30 G shaped layout. He has two emergency off switches in the fascia. They are simply household light switches wired in series with a power strip. The power strip is wired to the last one. The first switch is wired via a power cord plugged into a wall socket. Turning off either one turns off the track power.

 

My thought is this, wire a number (1-6) standard household light switches in series. Each located at vital spots around the layout. You can use standard two wire household wire. Cut the switches into the white wire, and wire the black wires together in each box. At the last switch in the string connect white wire to the switch and the black wire to the switch to the other side. Power will run through the switches and return to the source via the black wire.

 

At the source (hear I am assuming you use a power strip) connect the white (switched) wire to the white side of the power cord on the plug side. Connect the black side to the white wire going to the power strip outlets or what ever you use to plug your “Track” power into.

 

An alternate is to do like my friend did. Cut the plug off the power strip and wire that to the last switch. On the front end wire a power cord to the first switch and plug it in. The switches are wired in series on the white side.

 

One fallacy of my friend’s system was mounting the switches in the fascia. During a recent open house, two too many visitors in the inside aisle accidently shut power off a few times. I would mount the switches below the layout but accessible and marked on the fascia. Operators should know where they are. He is currently figuring out how to recess his.

 

Materials:

            Economy light switches. Look for them in bulk boxes at the home centers. They are about a third the cost of the boxed variety.

            Junction boxes. I typically use the blue plastic 1x2.5x3.5” box. I drill two small holes about 3/8” in from the front and mount them with drywall screws. The will take the standard switch or outlet.

            Cover plate. Get the typical face plate, rough sand it, definitely prime with a solvent based prime, and paint it what ever color you desire.

            Wire. Two-wire household wire is fine since it is a closed loop.

 

My set-up is a Rube Goldberg affair. My current layout is on two doors occasionally set up on the dining room table. My emergency shut of is a string wrapped around the wall wart that plugs into the wall. The string is attached to the layout at the farthest point from the outlet. I operate from one side only sitting in an office chair; the string lies in my lap. All I need to do is pull the string. And yes, I have used it on many occasions.

 

My modus operendi is to set a passenger train or manifest freight in motion on the continuous run and operate a way-freight around that trying to avoid stopping that train.

 

Glenn

 

terryintexas7@...
 

Most power strips have an off on switch
It's what i use for my 12x12 layout
Terry
 

In a message dated 2/12/2014 4:48:16 A.M. Central Standard Time, ghazel@... writes:
 

Do you really need a specialized emergency shut off?

I have a friend who has a 12x12 On30 G shaped layout. He has two emergency off switches in the fascia. They are simply household light switches wired in series with a power strip. The power strip is wired to the last one. The first switch is wired via a power cord plugged into a wall socket. Turning off either one turns off the track power.

My thought is this, wire a number (1-6) standard household light switches in series. Each located at vital spots around the layout. You can use standard two wire household wire. Cut the switches into the white wire, and wire the black wires together in each box. At the last switch in the string connect white wire to the switch and the black wire to the switch to the other side. Power will run through the switches and return to the source via the black wire.

At the source (hear I am assuming you use a power strip) connect the white (switched) wire to the white side of the power cord on the plug side. Connect the black side to the white wire going to the power strip outlets or what ever you use to plug your “Track” power into.

An alternate is to do like my friend did. Cut the plug off the power strip and wire that to the last switch. On the front end wire a power cord to the first switch and plug it in. The switches are wired in series on the white side.

One fallacy of my friend’s system was mounting the switches in the fascia. During a recent open house, two too many visitors in the inside aisle accidently shut power off a few times. I would mount the switches below the layout but accessible and marked on the fascia. Operators should know where they are. He is currently figuring out how to recess his.

Materials:

            Economy light switches. Look for them in bulk boxes at the home centers. They are about a third the cost of the boxed variety.

            Junction boxes. I typically use the blue plastic 1x2.5x3.5” box. I drill two small holes about 3/8” in from the front and mount them with drywall screws. The will take the standard switch or outlet.

            Cover plate. Get the typical face plate, rough sand it, definitely prime with a solvent based prime, and paint it what ever color you desire.

            Wire. Two-wire household wire is fine since it is a closed loop.

My set-up is a Rube Goldberg affair. My current layout is on two doors occasionally set up on the dining room table. My emergency shut of is a string wrapped around the wall wart that plugs into the wall. The string is attached to the layout at the farthest point from the outlet. I operate from one side only sitting in an office chair; the string lies in my lap. All I need to do is pull the string. And yes, I have used it on many occasions.

My modus operendi is to set a passenger train or manifest freight in motion on the continuous run and operate a way-freight around that trying to avoid stopping that train.

Glenn

Flash Gordon
 


Glen,

The Emergency stop switch I bought is probably about as expensive as the parts you need.

It is already assembled, painted and labeled. It is obvious to what it is. Ready for surface mount ( there are punch-outs in the bottom) and it looks very professional. All I have to do is stick a wire in it.

You could use several in series.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/130970913952?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

Ed S

 


At 05:48 AM 2/12/2014, you wrote:
 

 

Materials:

            Economy light switches. Look for them in bulk boxes at the home centers. They are about a third the cost of the boxed variety.

            Junction boxes. I typically use the blue plastic 1x2.5x3.5� box. I drill two small holes about 3/8� in from the front and mount them with drywall screws. The will take the standard switch or outlet.

            Cover plate. Get the typical face plate, rough sand it, definitely prime with a solvent based prime, and paint it what ever color you desire.

            Wire. Two-wire household wire is fine since it is a closed loop.

 

Glenn

Carl
 

Hello Glenn:

If you are in the United States, the switches should always be in the Black Wire. The White Wire is neutral and at the breaker panel is connected to earth ground. You want to stop the voltage in the Black Wire so after the switch there is no risk of shock to ground.

Guards over the toggles would be nice, or recess them.

The nice thing about the industrial Emergency Stop Buttons is it only take a push to trigger them. But to reset them you must twist and pull the knob out, so it takes a special effort to restore power.

Carl.

On 2/12/2014 5:48 AM, Glenn wrote:
 

Cut the switches into the white wire, and wire the black wires together in each box. At the last switch in the string connect white wire to the switch and the black wire to the switch to the other side. Power will run through the switches and return to the source via the black wire.

 

At the source (hear I am assuming you use a power strip) connect the white (switched) wire to the white side of the power cord on the plug side. Connect the black side to the white wire going to the power strip outlets or what ever you use to plug your “Track” power into.

 


Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

On a smaller one booster layout, You can also wire the e-stop button chain to interrupts only DCC power to the rails and not fiddle with primary 120Vac wiring.

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Carl
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 9:37 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Emergency stop button -- IMHO

 



Hello Glenn:

If you are in the United States, the switches should always be in the Black Wire. The White Wire is neutral and at the breaker panel is connected to earth ground. You want to stop the voltage in the Black Wire so after the switch there is no risk of shock to ground.

Guards over the toggles would be nice, or recess them.

The nice thing about the industrial Emergency Stop Buttons is it only take a push to trigger them. But to reset them you must twist and pull the knob out, so it takes a special effort to restore power.

Carl.

On 2/12/2014 5:48 AM, Glenn wrote:

 

Cut the switches into the white wire, and wire the black wires together in each box. At the last switch in the string connect white wire to the switch and the black wire to the switch to the other side. Power will run through the switches and return to the source via the black wire.

 

At the source (hear I am assuming you use a power strip) connect the white (switched) wire to the white side of the power cord on the plug side. Connect the black side to the white wire going to the power strip outlets or what ever you use to plug your “Track” power into.

 





wirefordcc
 

If you have a Digitrax system, the DT402 throttles have an e-stop on them.


Allan


Glenn
 

Carl is right. I didn’t have my coffee yet J

 

Glenn

 

 


From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Carl
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 10:37
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Emergency stop button -- IMHO

 



Hello Glenn:

If you are in the United States, the switches should always be in the Black Wire. The White Wire is neutral and at the breaker panel is connected to earth ground. You want to stop the voltage in the Black Wire so after the switch there is no risk of shock to ground.

Guards over the toggles would be nice, or recess them.

The nice thing about the industrial Emergency Stop Buttons is it only take a push to trigger them. But to reset them you must twist and pull the knob out, so it takes a special effort to restore power.

Carl.

Glenn
 

Not to nit-pick but: Switch .75, box, .39, cover .25

 

I was not concerned about cost as much as availability. These items can be found at any home center or hardware store.

 

The “Real” thing is hard to find locally.

 

I did look at the eBay vendor cited other items and found this 5-pack

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111146956435?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

 

If I bought today I wouldn’t receive them until between March 4th and 20th.

 

Glenn

 


From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Ed S
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 09:41
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Emergency stop button -- IMHO

 




Glen,

The Emergency stop switch I bought is probably about as expensive as the parts you need.

It is already assembled, painted and labeled. It is obvious to what it is. Ready for surface mount ( there are punch-outs in the bottom) and it looks very professional. All I have to do is stick a wire in it.

You could use several in series.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/130970913952?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

Ed S



 

At 05:48 AM 2/12/2014, you wrote:

 

 

Materials:

            Economy light switches. Look for them in bulk boxes at the home centers. They are about a third the cost of the boxed variety.

            Junction boxes. I typically use the blue plastic 1x2.5x3.5 box. I drill two small holes about 3/8 in from the front and mount them with drywall screws. The will take the standard switch or outlet.

            Cover plate. Get the typical face plate, rough sand it, definitely prime with a solvent based prime, and paint it what ever color you desire.

            Wire. Two-wire household wire is fine since it is a closed loop.

 

Glenn


Flash Gordon
 

Glenn,

You  are correct, it took a month to get my  ESB but when you are retired you tend to plan ahead, and you really don't even know what day of the week it is. But it arrived all ready to go, no assembly or painting required.

If you remember the Ren an Stimpy show, this is my "end of the world button" and it will be mounted on the main control board.

Ed S


At 10:03 AM 2/13/2014, you wrote:
 

Not to nit-pick but: Switch .75, box, .39, cover .25

 

I was not concerned about cost as much as availability. These items can be found at any home center or hardware store.

 

The �Real� thing is hard to find locally.

 

I did look at the eBay vendor cited other items and found this 5-pack

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111146956435?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

 

If I bought today I wouldn�t receive them until between March 4th and 20th.

 

Glenn

 

Michael Looney
 

I have a question wouldn't it be easier to just pull the plug from the throttle doing that will stop everything.
Mike Looney
 
 

On 02/13/14, Glenn wrote:
 
 

Not to nit-pick but: Switch .75, box, .39,cover .25

 

I was not concerned about cost as much asavailability. These items can be found at any home center or hardware store.

 

The “Real” thing is hard tofind locally.

 

I did look at the eBay vendor cited otheritems and found this 5-pack

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111146956435?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

 

If I bought today I wouldn’t receivethem until between March 4th and 20th.

 

Glenn

 


From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Ed S
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 201409:41
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC]Emergency stop button -- IMHO

 




Glen,

The Emergency stop switch I bought is probably about as expensive as the partsyou need.

It is already assembled, painted and labeled. It is obvious to what it is.Ready for surface mount ( there are punch-outs in the bottom) and it looks veryprofessional. All I have to do is stick a wire in it.

You could use several in series.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/130970913952?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

Ed S



 

At 05:48 AM 2/12/2014, you wrote:

 

 

Materials:

           Economy light switches. Look for them in bulk boxes at the home centers. Theyare about a third the cost of the boxed variety.

           Junction boxes. I typically use the blue plastic 1x2.5x3.5 box. I drilltwo small holes about 3/8 in from the front and mount them with drywallscrews. The will take the standard switch or outlet.

           Cover plate. Get the typical face plate, rough sand it, definitely prime with asolvent based prime, and paint it what ever color you desire.

           Wire. Two-wire household wire is fine since it is a closed loop.

 

Glenn


Glenn
 

I too have the ‘retired’ disease. It’s almost a bad as the pre-retirement disorder J

 

I spent 20-years in the army roaming about the world. Not having the chance for a permanent layout, I accumulated scads of HO building kits and HO scenic details. Then upon retirement I changed scales.

 

After a brief stint in On30, I now model On20 (HOn3 track). I have managed to gather 8 suitable HOn3 locomotive chassis and enough trucks for 25 cars. All I have is a 2’ x 4’ test track with 5 switches and DCC.

 

My problem is time. I am now 67, besides still maintaining our estate, I have been given the household duties as well, cleaning, washing, cooking…. I figure I have 6-8-years left on my sentence, she retires then.

 

Glenn

 


On Behalf Of Ed S

Glenn,

You  are correct, it took a month to get my  ESB but when you are retired you tend to plan ahead, and you really don't even know what day of the week it is. But it arrived all ready to go, no assembly or painting required.

Ed S


Flash Gordon
 

Mike,

That will not turn off all the accessories, lighting, transformers... etc.

The original idea is to shut everything down in an emergency.... like "dinner is ready"

Ed S

At 07:05 PM 2/13/2014, you wrote:


I have a question wouldn't it be easier to just pull the plug from the throttle doing that will stop everything.
Mike Looney

john
 

Mike,
   No, no, no, Not only will you engines keep running but the may start running on their own later on when they get power. One of those popular remote light switches could work, the conductor can carry it and operate it in an emergency.

From: "excalibur5776@..."
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2014 7:05 PM
Subject: Re: RE: [WiringForDCC] Emergency stop button -- IMHO



I have a question wouldn't it be easier to just pull the plug from the throttle doing that will stop everything.
Mike Looney
 
 
On 02/13/14, Glenn wrote:
 
 
Not to nit-pick but: Switch .75, box, .39,cover .25
 
I was not concerned about cost as much asavailability. These items can be found at any home center or hardware store.
 
The “Real” thing is hard tofind locally.
 
I did look at the eBay vendor cited otheritems and found this 5-pack
http://www.ebay.com/itm/111146956435?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649
 
If I bought today I wouldn’t receivethem until between March 4th and 20th.
 
Glenn
 
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Ed S
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 201409:41
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC]Emergency stop button -- IMHO
 



Glen,

The Emergency stop switch I bought is probably about as expensive as the partsyou need.

It is already assembled, painted and labeled. It is obvious to what it is.Ready for surface mount ( there are punch-outs in the bottom) and it looks veryprofessional. All I have to do is stick a wire in it.

You could use several in series.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/130970913952?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

Ed S


 

At 05:48 AM 2/12/2014, you wrote:

 

 

Materials:

           Economy light switches. Look for them in bulk boxes at the home centers. Theyare about a third the cost of the boxed variety.

           Junction boxes. I typically use the blue plastic 1x2.5x3.5 box. I drilltwo small holes about 3/8 in from the front and mount them with drywallscrews. The will take the standard switch or outlet.

           Cover plate. Get the typical face plate, rough sand it, definitely prime with asolvent based prime, and paint it what ever color you desire.

           Wire. Two-wire household wire is fine since it is a closed loop.

 

Glenn





Carl
 

Hi Gang:

In tool and die trade school they had Master Emergency Buttons several places around the shop. Any one could shut all the shop machines down, only the instructors could turn it back on with a key.

With Digitrax you can unplug the throttle and walk to the next plug in and the locomotive will keep going.

Missing dinner is a major crisis. What is it you wish to avoid? A runaway locomotive, a track short burning up a passenger car, fire in the boosters?

Carl.

On 2/15/2014 11:19 AM, Ed S wrote:
 

Mike,

That will not turn off all the accessories, lighting, transformers... etc.

The original idea is to shut everything down in an emergency.... like
"dinner is ready"

Ed S

At 07:05 PM 2/13/2014, you wrote:
>
>
>I have a question wouldn't it be easier to just pull the plug from
>the throttle doing that will stop everything.
>Mike Looney
>
>


Flash Gordon
 


Hi Greg,

i want to turn everything on the layout off with one switch, because of all you mentioned, including dinner.

Let’s go back a few weeks.

Someone posted that a friend had a fire in his basement. The firemen said it was caused by an electrical short in a train layout, the wire along the bottom of the table had heated up (main buss maybe) and started the fire.

The poster wanted to know if this was possible.... after a lot of discussion....  the owner of the layout admitted he had forgot to turn the layout off.

Most likely the main bus was not heavy enough wire to carry enough current to trip the booster. A minor short occurred, probably a derailment.  The owner went to dinner, did not turn off the layout and ……..  smoked the layout.

Since I am older and do dumb things, I thought it was best for me to be able to turn everything off in an emergency or when I leave the room.

So I came up with this Emergency Shut Off Button.  It will work and do what I want it to do.... turn everything off. For quite awhile many have joined in the middle of the conversation and added many great ideas and I thank them all.

Can we STOP now pleaseeeeeeeeee?

Carl, we had those emergency stop button in the school shops where I taught. Probably where I got the bright idea.

Thanks

Ed S



At 11:40 AM 2/15/2014, you wrote:
 

Hi Gang:

In tool and die trade school they had Master Emergency Buttons several places around the shop. Any one could shut all the shop machines down, only the instructors could turn it back on with a key.

With Digitrax you can unplug the throttle and walk to the next plug in and the locomotive will keep going.

Missing dinner is a major crisis. What is it you wish to avoid? A runaway locomotive, a track short burning up a passenger car, fire in the boosters?

Carl.

Charles Brumbelow
 

Consider this switch on the wall plug side of the layout. Note that the hot and neutral wires are both connected to the switch itself. 

How it works: The "ON" button is a momentary contact, normally open switch which activates a built in solid state relay when pressed. That relay connects the wall plug to your layout. To shut everything down, press "STOP"  which disconnects a momentary contact normally closed switch to deactivate the built in relay. 

These switches are sold primarily into the power tool market - table saws etc. 

Woodstock D4160 110-Volt Paddle Switch by Woodstock http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005W17HYY/ref=cm_sw_r_udp_awd_1Ncatb0CV9N0N

Charles

On Feb 15, 2014, at 11:32 AM, Ed S <eschwerkolt@...> wrote:


Hi Greg,

i want to turn everything on the layout off with one switch, because of all you mentioned, including dinner.

Let’s go back a few weeks.

Someone posted that a friend had a fire in his basement. The firemen said it was caused by an electrical short in a train layout, the wire along the bottom of the table had heated up (main buss maybe) and started the fire.

The poster wanted to know if this was possible.... after a lot of discussion....  the owner of the layout admitted he had forgot to turn the layout off.

Most likely the main bus was not heavy enough wire to carry enough current to trip the booster. A minor short occurred, probably a derailment.  The owner went to dinner, did not turn off the layout and ……..  smoked the layout.

Since I am older and do dumb things, I thought it was best for me to be able to turn everything off in an emergency or when I leave the room.

So I came up with this Emergency Shut Off Button.  It will work and do what I want it to do.... turn everything off. For quite awhile many have joined in the middle of the conversation and added many great ideas and I thank them all.

Can we STOP now pleaseeeeeeeeee?

Carl, we had those emergency stop button in the school shops where I taught. Probably where I got the bright idea.

Thanks

Ed S



At 11:40 AM 2/15/2014, you wrote:
 

Hi Gang:

In tool and die trade school they had Master Emergency Buttons several places around the shop. Any one could shut all the shop machines down, only the instructors could turn it back on with a key.

With Digitrax you can unplug the throttle and walk to the next plug in and the locomotive will keep going.

Missing dinner is a major crisis. What is it you wish to avoid? A runaway locomotive, a track short burning up a passenger car, fire in the boosters?

Carl.

george hohon3
 

I'm always amazed by the trait held by a great majority of model railroaders that causes them to by pass the "keep it simple stupid" principle and they go off and try to complicate things.  From track road sub-base, to switch machines, to scenery, and everything in between, there is someone out there that has a better, faster, less expensive way to do something.  It never fails.

As for turning the power off to the layout room, the discussion has gotten so complicated, one might think we're talking about launching some sort of man eating robotic device that needs to be rendered useless if we're called for dinner.  I like to eat just as much as the next guy, but I hardly call it an "emergency" and if you're in a position that you must consider it so . . . you might want to evaluate your relationship with the dinner maker.

KISS - I have three (3) lighted 15 amp switches on the exterior wall of the layout room, right next to the door.  More than enough power to run a decent sized HO layout.  If the switch lights are 'ON' . . . the room has power.  If the switch lights are 'OFF' . . . the room has no power.

George
Keeping it Simple 


From: mrb37211@...
To: WiringForDCC@...
Date: Sat, 15 Feb 2014 21:10:06 -0600
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Emergency stop button -- IMHO

 

Consider this switch on the wall plug side of the layout. Note that the hot and neutral wires are both connected to the switch itself. 

How it works: The "ON" button is a momentary contact, normally open switch which activates a built in solid state relay when pressed. That relay connects the wall plug to your layout. To shut everything down, press "STOP"  which disconnects a momentary contact normally closed switch to deactivate the built in relay. 

These switches are sold primarily into the power tool market - table saws etc. 

Woodstock D4160 110-Volt Paddle Switch by Woodstock http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005W17HYY/ref=cm_sw_r_udp_awd_1Ncatb0CV9N0N

Charles

On Feb 15, 2014, at 11:32 AM, Ed S <eschwerkolt@...> wrote:


Hi Greg,

i want to turn everything on the layout off with one switch, because of all you mentioned, including dinner.

Let’s go back a few weeks.

Someone posted that a friend had a fire in his basement. The firemen said it was caused by an electrical short in a train layout, the wire along the bottom of the table had heated up (main buss maybe) and started the fire.

The poster wanted to know if this was possible.... after a lot of discussion....  the owner of the layout admitted he had forgot to turn the layout off.

Most likely the main bus was not heavy enough wire to carry enough current to trip the booster. A minor short occurred, probably a derailment.  The owner went to dinner, did not turn off the layout and ……..  smoked the layout.

Since I am older and do dumb things, I thought it was best for me to be able to turn everything off in an emergency or when I leave the room.

So I came up with this Emergency Shut Off Button.  It will work and do what I want it to do.... turn everything off. For quite awhile many have joined in the middle of the conversation and added many great ideas and I thank them all.

Can we STOP now pleaseeeeeeeeee?

Carl, we had those emergency stop button in the school shops where I taught. Probably where I got the bright idea.

Thanks

Ed S



At 11:40 AM 2/15/2014, you wrote:
 

Hi Gang:

In tool and die trade school they had Master Emergency Buttons several places around the shop. Any one could shut all the shop machines down, only the instructors could turn it back on with a key.

With Digitrax you can unplug the throttle and walk to the next plug in and the locomotive will keep going.

Missing dinner is a major crisis. What is it you wish to avoid? A runaway locomotive, a track short burning up a passenger car, fire in the boosters?

Carl.

Bernie Halloran
 

Gentlemen:
The lights in my 1,000 sq foot layout room are on 5 circuits; the total of 4 is 20 amps, and that’s for the overhead lights to illuminate the layout. One more 15 amp circuit handles incidental lighting for cruising around the basement without lighting it up like summertime noon.  The railroad NCE booster and step-down voltage for all switch machines, LED signals, and excruciating sounds from the slaughter house and rock crusher are all controlled by one switch with an “on” light.  When it’s turned on I have power for running trains, flipping switches, growling, and seeing inside the open-faced cabinet in which all this good stuff is located.
 
If I neglect to turn off all the lights; they stay on reminding me I did not turn them off. Then my wife, who pays the electric bill and all other bills involving the movement of electrons turns them off.
 
KISS. Keep it simple stupidios.
 
Yes, there’s a big ass fire extinguisher readily available. There are two ways out. And I’ve been known to leave my soldering iron plugged in.  Hence, stupido.
 
Bernie Halloran
NYK&W