Date   
Re: Buss Wiring

Steve Haas
 

>>>>I have just strung a 14 gauge DCC buss under the layout. The two wires are separated by about 6 inches at the closest. Do I need to re string the wires with a twist periodically? How close together should the twists be? What if I ran the wires close together, as in zip cord or speaker wire? I've read various things and am a little confused.<<<<

As someone else has already responded, buss wires 6 inches apart will not cause you any digital signal problems.

However, like many things with DCC, as the size and complexity of the layout and it’s wiring grows,  it may be better to keep the wires together and twist them – three to five twists a foot is more than adequate.

It depends on the complexity of your layout and the wiring needed to achieve your DCC performance objectives.

Best regards,

Steve

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GregW66




Re: Buss Wiring

Steve Haas
 

 

>>>>Whether on my home layout, 12'x24', my club layout of 5000 square feet, or my Free-mo modules which are 2'x5', they all have the wires next to each other being pulled through the same holes.<<<<

 

Having worked on a large (28 x 42 foot) layout, I can tell you that one of the _LAST_ things you want to do is to route your bus wires (be they Booster, Circuit Breaker, or Block) through holes in the benchwork.   It takes extra time and effort to drill those holes, and (as happens far more often we care to admit) any time you have to do rework on your wiring, you’ll have to unsolder any track leads soldered to the buses before you can extract the wires back out of those holes.

 

The exception to this is modules, where they are moved often.  In that case, running the wiring through holes in the module benchworks will serve to protect the wiring from the higher probability of damage due to frequent movement.

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 

Re: Buss Wiring

David Klemm
 

Steve,

When we starting assembling the bench work for the 5000 square foot layout we had jugs in one area with people cutting and drilling.  Then the pieces were moved to areas to be assembled. So we overcame your time issue. It isn’t one and the bench work looks like the ribbings of a plane wing. 

David Klemm
8 Plus
_____________________________
From: Goatfisher2@... [WiringForDCC]
Sent: Saturday, November 18, 2017 01:15
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Buss Wiring
To:


 

 

>>>>Whether on my home layout, 12'x24', my club layout of 5000 square feet, or my Free-mo modules which are 2'x5', they all have the wires next to each other being pulled through the same holes.<<<<

 

Having worked on a large (28 x 42 foot) layout, I can tell you that one of the _LAST_ things you want to do is to route your bus wires (be they Booster, Circuit Breaker, or Block) through holes in the benchwork.   It takes extra time and effort to drill those holes, and (as happens far more often we care to admit) any time you have to do rework on your wiring, you’ll have to unsolder any track leads soldered to the buses before you can extract the wires back out of those holes.

 

The exception to this is modules, where they are moved often.  In that case, running the wiring through holes in the module benchworks will serve to protect the wiring from the higher probability of damage due to frequent movement.

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 



Re: Buss Wiring

Jerry Michels
 

Regarding the R-C Snubbers, the post said to install them at the end of the longest run of the buss.  If you do that, and use current detection, they will cause a false trigger.  How could they not since at the end of the longest run of the buss they are the last "thing" on the buss.  Or am I missing something?

Jerry Michels

Re: Buss Wiring

Steve Haas
 

>>>Regarding the R-C Snubbers, the post said to install them at the end of the longest run of the buss.  If you do that, and use current detection, they will cause a false trigger.  How could they not since at the end of the longest run of the buss they are the last "thing" on the buss.  Or am I missing something?<<<

 

Jerry,

 

I think part of the problem is how each of us visualizes our DCC wiring topology.  Let’s add some visuals we can all look at and hopefully bring some clarity to this subject.

 

Point your browser here: http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#long_bus

 

Now scroll down to the topic heading: Block Wiring for Large Layouts (V2.0).  Let’s look at the graphic “Dedicated Local Bus”:

 

  1. First, note the bus running right to left across the bottom of the drawing; Twisted pair, runs to the far end of block 1, ends with an R-C filter.
  2. Now, let’s look at block 1 – track the wires from the rails down to the local buses where one of the local bus wires passes through the Block detector (in Mark’s drawings, a BD20, but it could be any detector.
  3. With nothing in block 1 the circuit for block 1 is open through that block’s BD20 – no current load in the block, no detection.
  4. Notice that the R-C filter on the end of the bus places no current load on the BD20’s for any block.
  5. If necessary, additional R-C filters can be installed across the main bus anywhere between the R-C Filter in the diagram and the booster at the other end.  Note that none of these additional R-C filters would trigger any of the BD20’s as they are always monitoring an open circuit . . .  . . unless there is equipment in the block, or you left your pliers or NMRA track gauge across the track .

 

Sorry for possibly breaking things down to a perhaps far too elementary level, but it’s a style that is useful to me to make sure I haven’t littered the discussion with glittering generalities.

 

Does this answer your questions?  If not, let me know and we’ll try it again!

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 

Re: Buss Wiring

Steve Haas
 

 

 

>>>>>When we starting assembling the bench work for the 5000 square foot layout we had jugs in one area with people cutting and drilling.  Then the pieces were moved to areas to be assembled

 

Hi David,

 

An interesting point.  Jigs and mass production are definitely the way to go for repetitive tasks such as this – they also serve to maintain a high level of quality. 

 

But . . . . . how many man hours were consumed fabricating those jigs and then drilling all those holes?  If a  large labor pool is available, , as your club apparently did,  and there’s nothing else that labor can be doing during this phase of construction then  the impacts on the overall project are small.  However, for a smaller organization, or an organization where getting folks to turn out for work sessions is difficult, or for the individual building a layout by himself of with the help of a few friends, those man hours might be a significant impact on the time line to completion.  All those hours spent fabricating the jigs and then drilling those hole could be spent on other aspects of layout construction.  That’s my first point . . . . proper allocation of scarce resources.

 

Beyond that,  we should take a look at the utility of all those holes as compared to other options for running wires.  It’s quicker and faster to run cables suspended just below the benchwork.  One doesn’t need to thread those wires through all those holes.  Cable hangers are more than sufficient.

 

However, my biggest reason for avoiding running wires through more holes than necessary, is the possibility of rework/redesign of a portion of the layout.  Before those wires through those holes need to be re-routed, any feeders attached to them will need to be clipped, the wires pulled back through the holes and then rerouted, and finally feeders re-attached.  If the wires don’t go through all those holes, the possibility exists that many of those feeders won’t need to be clipped and re-routed.  To be honest, how much this impacts any given layout depends on the wiring topography of the layout.  Long distribution runs won’t be impacted as much as area specific wiring such as individual block buses. 

 

Nonetheless, there’s still little if any benefit of going to the effort of drilling all those holes when wiring can be easily routed just below the benchwork.

 

>>>>>. So we overcame your time issue. It isn’t one and the bench work looks like the ribbings of a plane wing.<<<<<

 

If you have superfluous resources, time indeed won’t be an issue.

 

But, I have to ask,  who will be looking at all those beautiful airplane ribs once the scenery is covering it?  Probably only the electrical crew that has to clip those feeders, re-route those busses and re-connect all those feeders!

 

However,

 

It is your club’s layout, and they are free to use scarce resources as they see fit.

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

Re: Buss Wiring

Wil Davis <wdavis5069@...>
 

I don't pretend to be an expert, but I have read everything on Alan
Gartner's and Mark Guries' web sites and have tried to apply what I
learned in wiring a large modular display as well as a friend's large
N-scale layout.  The module layout is about 70' x 90' that includes a
large U in the center.  I twisted all of the bus wires and we have about
320+ feet of mainline in each of two mainline tracks.  They are fed
through six boosters and over a dozen PSX breakers.   Each power
district is 40 to 60 ft at the max and is terminated in a "snubber."  We
do not use detection at the present time, and the bus wiring is 14 ga
MTW stranded wire with all track feeds connected with "Suitcase"
connectors.  We travel all over Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Kentucky,
Tennessee and Pennsylvania.  We have been using most of these modules
for about 10 to six years (It took a few years to grow to our present
size) and we have not have any problems that can be attributed to wiring
issues.  We did have some flaky problems before we added the snubbers
and after that the problems went away.


I am also wiring a friend's N Scale 20 x 35 ft layout using the same
techniques with the difference in the number of boosters and PSX
breakers as it is single track with passing sidings.  The basic
difference is detection.  I have installed about two dozen BD20 current
detectors to show occupancy and although we are not operating yet, we
have been testing as we go and so far have not had problems with false
detection due to the BD20s.  The detected blocks are fairly short and
all are on sub buses, so that may be the reason as the short sub buses
are not terminated, just the main bus.

Like I said, I don't claim to be an expert, this is just my experience
to date.

Wil

Re: Buss Wiring

Puckdropper
 

Some current detectors, like the RR Cir-kits BOD-8, have adjustable sensitivity.  I twisted the bus wires when running the new busses but didn't feel the need to install RC snubbers.  Setting up the BOD-8 was a process of adjusting the screw until the detection light came on and backing it off slowly until the light went out.  Go slow, there's a 2 second delay to prevent false clears.

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., <gjmichels53@...> wrote :

Regarding the R-C Snubbers, the post said to install them at the end of the longest run of the buss.  If you do that, and use current detection, they will cause a false trigger.  How could they not since at the end of the longest run of the buss they are the last "thing" on the buss.  Or am I missing something?

Jerry Michels

Wire gauge remedy

Blair & Rasa
 

Hi

Debugging another friend's layout.  His bus wiring is not up to snuff, as the coin test fails in many sectors.  It's clear to me that his bus wires, 16 and 18 ga speaker wire with numerous butt-splice connections, is the root of the problem; it's an old DC layout, with the blocks rewired.  Runs are in the 25' range, so I'm not worried about distance.  He's reluctant to completely rewire, as he did put feeders in for every section of rail.

I think he could improve performance by running a parallel larger gauge buss pair, interconnecting the Rail A to Rail A' wires, and the Rail B to Rail B' wires, at regular intervals (say 5').  Think of each buss as beginning to look like a ladder, with the rungs being the interconnects and the feeders running from one side of the ladder to the rails; really, this is an extension of the rails-parallel-to-the-bus wires anyway, now we just have three parallel paths.

Does anyone see a serious gotcha with this?  I don't see one, as long as the A and A' wires, and the B and B' wires, stay in reasonable proximity.  It's not ideal, but it is a lot less work than a complete rewiring, especially as some of his feeders are darn near inaccessible.

Thanks for any suggestions

Blair

Re: Wire gauge remedy

Mark Gurries
 

Do not see a problem.

I do have a question, what is being used to assign power to a given block? If he serious about DCC, he should remove the block switches completely and think about power districts. You can still use the switches for power districts to locate a short circuit. But a lot of the blocks could be simplifies by reduction in complexity. The wiring would be simpler.

On Nov 26, 2017, at 6:45 PM, Blair & Rasa smithbr@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Hi

Debugging another friend's layout. His bus wiring is not up to snuff,
as the coin test fails in many sectors. It's clear to me that his bus
wires, 16 and 18 ga speaker wire with numerous butt-splice connections,
is the root of the problem; it's an old DC layout, with the blocks
rewired. Runs are in the 25' range, so I'm not worried about distance.
He's reluctant to completely rewire, as he did put feeders in for every
section of rail.

I think he could improve performance by running a parallel larger gauge
buss pair, interconnecting the Rail A to Rail A' wires, and the Rail B
to Rail B' wires, at regular intervals (say 5'). Think of each buss as
beginning to look like a ladder, with the rungs being the interconnects
and the feeders running from one side of the ladder to the rails;
really, this is an extension of the rails-parallel-to-the-bus wires
anyway, now we just have three parallel paths.

Does anyone see a serious gotcha with this? I don't see one, as long as
the A and A' wires, and the B and B' wires, stay in reasonable
proximity. It's not ideal, but it is a lot less work than a complete
rewiring, especially as some of his feeders are darn near inaccessible.

Thanks for any suggestions

Blair




------------------------------------
Posted by: Blair & Rasa <smithbr@...>
------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com

Re: Wire gauge remedy

Blair & Rasa
 

Thanks, Mark.  It's more a matter of "If it works, I'm not touching it.  I might break it."  He's change-wary.  This solution will likely make sense to him, as it's not really disturbing what he has.  We'll install the new bus, add some taps, and then splice them into what's there.  We can test as we go, to make sure we haven't crossed anything over, but it should be reasonably easy. At least his feeders were all wired "black to the back", so we have a direct indication of which old bus wire is which.  There's only one reversing section to worry about.  For now, I won't worry about those rail segments which are fed only through a rail joiner, though we'll have to contend with those if they're as flaky as I think they will be.

I suspect if his DCC works better after that, he may even opt for a new layout with new-found enthusiasm, as this old one has seen better days (another reason for minimizing the improvement effort), but I'm trying to keep him from giving up on DCC because "it doesn't work reliably".  He won't build a new layout if he has to repeat the DC block trauma, so then he'll just continue with the old DC layout - or quit entirely.

Blair

Re: Wire gauge remedy

dvollrath@...
 

Blair,

The size of the wire might not be the real problem. #18 can easily carry enough current to pass the coin test. Look at all the power wiring splices. Many non-electrician types tend to simply twist the wires together and thereby making a poor electrical connection which can get worse over time. Verify that the joints are either soldered or are correctly using wire nuts. Also verify the soldering of feeder wire connections to the rails... especially at those sections that don't pass the coin test. Do not rely on track feeder wires connected to rail joiners as the joiners to rail connections are the problem. If that is the case, be sure to solder the joiner to the rail.


DonV  



---In WiringForDCC@..., <smithbr@...> wrote :

Hi

Debugging another friend's layout.  His bus wiring is not up to snuff,
as the coin test fails in many sectors.  It's clear to me that his bus
wires, 16 and 18 ga speaker wire with numerous butt-splice connections,
is the root of the problem; it's an old DC layout, with the blocks
rewired.  Runs are in the 25' range, so I'm not worried about distance. 
He's reluctant to completely rewire, as he did put feeders in for every
section of rail.

I think he could improve performance by running a parallel larger gauge
buss pair, interconnecting the Rail A to Rail A' wires, and the Rail B
to Rail B' wires, at regular intervals (say 5').  Think of each buss as
beginning to look like a ladder, with the rungs being the interconnects
and the feeders running from one side of the ladder to the rails;
really, this is an extension of the rails-parallel-to-the-bus wires
anyway, now we just have three parallel paths.

Does anyone see a serious gotcha with this?  I don't see one, as long as
the A and A' wires, and the B and B' wires, stay in reasonable
proximity.  It's not ideal, but it is a lot less work than a complete
rewiring, especially as some of his feeders are darn near inaccessible.

Thanks for any suggestions

Blair

Re: Wire gauge remedy

Blair & Rasa
 

All good points, Don, I'll keep that list in mind as we dig deeper.  Many of the joints are crimp butt-splice connectors, good in theory but prone to weak-hand syndrome.

Thanks

Blair


On 2017-11-27 09:37, dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:

Blair,

The size of the wire might not be the real problem. #18 can easily carry enough current to pass the coin test. Look at all the power wiring splices. Many non-electrician types tend to simply twist the wires together and thereby making a poor electrical connection which can get worse over time. Verify that the joints are either soldered or are correctly using wire nuts. Also verify the soldering of feeder wire connections to the rails... especially at those sections that don't pass the coin test. Do not rely on track feeder wires connected to rail joiners as the joiners to rail connections are the problem. If that is the case, be sure to solder the joiner to the rail.


DonV  



---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

Hi

Debugging another friend's layout.  His bus wiring is not up to snuff,
as the coin test fails in many sectors.  It's clear to me that his bus
wires, 16 and 18 ga speaker wire with numerous butt-splice connections,
is the root of the problem; it's an old DC layout, with the blocks
rewired.  Runs are in the 25' range, so I'm not worried about distance. 
He's reluctant to completely rewire, as he did put feeders in for every
section of rail.

I think he could improve performance by running a parallel larger gauge
buss pair, interconnecting the Rail A to Rail A' wires, and the Rail B
to Rail B' wires, at regular intervals (say 5').  Think of each buss as
beginning to look like a ladder, with the rungs being the interconnects
and the feeders running from one side of the ladder to the rails;
really, this is an extension of the rails-parallel-to-the-bus wires
anyway, now we just have three parallel paths.

Does anyone see a serious gotcha with this?  I don't see one, as long as
the A and A' wires, and the B and B' wires, stay in reasonable
proximity.  It's not ideal, but it is a lot less work than a complete
rewiring, especially as some of his feeders are darn near inaccessible.

Thanks for any suggestions

Blair

Re: Buss Wiring

dvollrath@...
 

Will, re the use of snubbers.


Your comment that "The detected blocks are fairly short and
all are on sub buses, so that may be the reason as the short sub buses are not terminated, just the main bus." is exactly the right approach. Terminate the main feeder bus with a snubber. Never put a snubber on a sub-bus with current detectors as the detector will always show as 'occupied' as it detects the small amount of current drawn by the snubber.


DonV 



---In WiringForDCC@..., <wdavis5069@...> wrote :

I don't pretend to be an expert, but I have read everything on Alan
Gartner's and Mark Guries' web sites and have tried to apply what I
learned in wiring a large modular display as well as a friend's large
N-scale layout.  The module layout is about 70' x 90' that includes a
large U in the center.  I twisted all of the bus wires and we have about
320+ feet of mainline in each of two mainline tracks.  They are fed
through six boosters and over a dozen PSX breakers.   Each power
district is 40 to 60 ft at the max and is terminated in a "snubber."  We
do not use detection at the present time, and the bus wiring is 14 ga
MTW stranded wire with all track feeds connected with "Suitcase"
connectors.  We travel all over Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Kentucky,
Tennessee and Pennsylvania.  We have been using most of these modules
for about 10 to six years (It took a few years to grow to our present
size) and we have not have any problems that can be attributed to wiring
issues.  We did have some flaky problems before we added the snubbers
and after that the problems went away.


I am also wiring a friend's N Scale 20 x 35 ft layout using the same
techniques with the difference in the number of boosters and PSX
breakers as it is single track with passing sidings.  The basic
difference is detection.  I have installed about two dozen BD20 current
detectors to show occupancy and although we are not operating yet, we
have been testing as we go and so far have not had problems with false
detection due to the BD20s.  The detected blocks are fairly short and
all are on sub buses, so that may be the reason as the short sub buses
are not terminated, just the main bus.

Like I said, I don't claim to be an expert, this is just my experience
to date.

Wil

Re: Wire gauge remedy

dvollrath@...
 


Crimped barrel splices, especially insulated ones, are also subject to where the wire is pushed too far into the barrel and the insulation is actually being crimped in the conductor space instead of only the metal part of the wire.

DonV  

---In WiringForDCC@..., <smithbr@...> wrote :

All good points, Don, I'll keep that list in mind as we dig deeper.  Many of the joints are crimp butt-splice connectors, good in theory but prone to weak-hand syndrome.

Thanks

Blair


On 2017-11-27 09:37, dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:

Blair,

The size of the wire might not be the real problem. #18 can easily carry enough current to pass the coin test. Look at all the power wiring splices. Many non-electrician types tend to simply twist the wires together and thereby making a poor electrical connection which can get worse over time. Verify that the joints are either soldered or are correctly using wire nuts. Also verify the soldering of feeder wire connections to the rails... especially at those sections that don't pass the coin test. Do not rely on track feeder wires connected to rail joiners as the joiners to rail connections are the problem. If that is the case, be sure to solder the joiner to the rail.


DonV  



---In WiringForDCC@..., <smithbr@...> wrote :

Hi

Debugging another friend's layout.  His bus wiring is not up to snuff,
as the coin test fails in many sectors.  It's clear to me that his bus
wires, 16 and 18 ga speaker wire with numerous butt-splice connections,
is the root of the problem; it's an old DC layout, with the blocks
rewired.  Runs are in the 25' range, so I'm not worried about distance. 
He's reluctant to completely rewire, as he did put feeders in for every
section of rail.

I think he could improve performance by running a parallel larger gauge
buss pair, interconnecting the Rail A to Rail A' wires, and the Rail B
to Rail B' wires, at regular intervals (say 5').  Think of each buss as
beginning to look like a ladder, with the rungs being the interconnects
and the feeders running from one side of the ladder to the rails;
really, this is an extension of the rails-parallel-to-the-bus wires
anyway, now we just have three parallel paths.

Does anyone see a serious gotcha with this?  I don't see one, as long as
the A and A' wires, and the B and B' wires, stay in reasonable
proximity.  It's not ideal, but it is a lot less work than a complete
rewiring, especially as some of his feeders are darn near inaccessible.

Thanks for any suggestions

Blair

Re: Wire gauge remedy

Chris Killgore
 

DO NOT USE WIRE NUTS!!!

Chris


On 11/27/2017 9:47 AM, dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
 


Crimped barrel splices, especially insulated ones, are also subject to where the wire is pushed too far into the barrel and the insulation is actually being crimped in the conductor space instead of only the metal part of the wire.

DonV  

---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

All good points, Don, I'll keep that list in mind as we dig deeper.  Many of the joints are crimp butt-splice connectors, good in theory but prone to weak-hand syndrome.

Thanks

Blair


On 2017-11-27 09:37, dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:

Blair,

The size of the wire might not be the real problem. #18 can easily carry enough current to pass the coin test. Look at all the power wiring splices. Many non-electrician types tend to simply twist the wires together and thereby making a poor electrical connection which can get worse over time. Verify that the joints are either soldered or are correctly using wire nuts. Also verify the soldering of feeder wire connections to the rails... especially at those sections that don't pass the coin test. Do not rely on track feeder wires connected to rail joiners as the joiners to rail connections are the problem. If that is the case, be sure to solder the joiner to the rail.


DonV  



---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

Hi

Debugging another friend's layout.  His bus wiring is not up to snuff,
as the coin test fails in many sectors.  It's clear to me that his bus
wires, 16 and 18 ga speaker wire with numerous butt-splice connections,
is the root of the problem; it's an old DC layout, with the blocks
rewired.  Runs are in the 25' range, so I'm not worried about distance. 
He's reluctant to completely rewire, as he did put feeders in for every
section of rail.

I think he could improve performance by running a parallel larger gauge
buss pair, interconnecting the Rail A to Rail A' wires, and the Rail B
to Rail B' wires, at regular intervals (say 5').  Think of each buss as
beginning to look like a ladder, with the rungs being the interconnects
and the feeders running from one side of the ladder to the rails;
really, this is an extension of the rails-parallel-to-the-bus wires
anyway, now we just have three parallel paths.

Does anyone see a serious gotcha with this?  I don't see one, as long as
the A and A' wires, and the B and B' wires, stay in reasonable
proximity.  It's not ideal, but it is a lot less work than a complete
rewiring, especially as some of his feeders are darn near inaccessible.

Thanks for any suggestions

Blair


Re: Wire gauge remedy

dvollrath@...
 

Chris,

What's your sad story about wire nuts?

Every electrical wire connecting means can be a disaster if not properly selected to match the wire size & type and/or otherwise misused.


DonV



---In WiringForDCC@..., <cochoochoo@...> wrote :

DO NOT USE WIRE NUTS!!!

Chris



Re: Wire gauge remedy

David Klemm
 

Chris,

Don’t look behind every switch plate, outlet cover or light fixture where you live or work or shop!  

David Klemm
8 Plus
_____________________________
From: dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC]
Sent: Monday, November 27, 2017 13:00
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Re: Wire gauge remedy
To:

 

Chris,

What's your sad story about wire nuts?

Every electrical wire connecting means can be a disaster if not properly selected to match the wire size & type and/or otherwise misused.


DonV



---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

DO NOT USE WIRE NUTS!!!

Chris





Re: Wire gauge remedy

Tim Johnson
 

Why not use wire nuts?

On my layout very drop from a rail is connected to a soldered wire from the bus with a wire nut. I've never had a problem, and it is very convenient if you need to isolate that rail section (assuming the rails are not electrically joined).
-- 
Tim
Timothy A Johnson, Tucson, AZ (www.sbb-bls-bahnen.com)
European Train Enthusiasts, Central Arizona Chapter (www.ete.org)

---In WiringForDCC@..., <cochoochoo@...> wrote :

DO NOT USE WIRE NUTS!!!

Chris



 

Re: Wire gauge remedy

Richard Gagnon
 

As an slectrician, I have usrceire nuts for many years.

Rich




On Monday, November 27, 2017, 2:11 PM, DAVID KLEMM davidklemm7511@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:



Chris,

Don’t look behind every switch plate, outlet cover or light fixture where you live or work or shop!  

David Klemm
8 Plus
_____________________________
From: dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC]
Sent: Monday, November 27, 2017 13:00
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Re: Wire gauge remedy
To:


 

Chris,

What's your sad story about wire nuts?

Every electrical wire connecting means can be a disaster if not properly selected to match the wire size & type and/or otherwise misused.


DonV



---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

DO NOT USE WIRE NUTS!!!

Chris