Date   
Help for a electronic blockhead

george hohon3
 

Have been to the website, have reviewed the section on Wiring for DCC using miniature lamps and found nothing related to my problem.

I want to power caboose lighting directly from DCC track power.  I have Tomar lanterns requiring no more than 1.5 vdc and I have a couple of SMD LEDs that require no more than 12.0 vdc.  I'm a total dummy when it comes to wiring stuff up correctly, but I do know how to follow a circuit schematic.

Can someone direct me to a schematic of a circuit that might do the job?  There is no decoder involved, power would come from the track itself.

Thanks.


Re: Help for a electronic blockhead

jazzmanlj
 

You can use rectifiers and LM317 adjustable regulator to get the voltages you need.


Len Jaskiewicz

Gap alignment

JBJudy
 

Hello:

My first question, as we are starting our 2nd N scale layout - this one using DCC (Digitrax). I have a double test loop to "play" with and begin the joy of DCC. I'm wondering if the 2 gaps in the rail, isolating a reverse loop, need to be directly across from each other. If you put gaps in a curve - what if they aren't directly across where both wheels on an axle might react at slightly different times - although minute, will this be an issue? Hope I explained this question well enough.  Thank you in advance.  JB

Re: Gap alignment

Paul O
 

JB, no problem if the gaps are not aligned.

The first wheel to cross an out of phase gap will trigger the reverser.

 

Paul O

Re: Gap alignment

Steve Haas
 

<<I'm wondering if the 2 gaps in the rail, isolating a reverse loop, need to be directly across from each other.>>

 

No reason to worry – gaps don’t need to be exactly opposite each other.

 

Neither is there a need to make sure the gaps are offset as some folks have argued.

 

Close is fine.

 

 

Best regards,

 

Steve

 

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 

Re: Help for a electronic blockhead

dvollrath@...
 

Re: Help for a electronic blockhead

george hohon3
 

I got a portion of this section, but not the last three pages?  Your link has a circuit addressing my problem directly, thanks.

George


To: WiringForDCC@...
From: WiringForDCC@...
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 19:55:59 -0700
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Help for a electronic blockhead

 

Wiring Accessory Lamps to the DCC Bus

redking56@...
 

Although it may not be the best use of DCC power, can I use the DCC bus to power 12 volt incandescent lamps ?


How about using the DCC bus to power LEDs that provide light inside my structures?


Thanks.


Rich

Re: Wiring Accessory Lamps to the DCC Bus

Glenn
 

There is nothing wrong with using the DCC bus to power accessories & lamps. However you must consider that each accessory/lamp will rob from the available power to run trains.

 

Also consider the more wiring connected to the bus will also increase the greater chance of an undetectable short.

 

Glenn


From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Monday, September 15, 2014 06:27
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Wiring Accessory Lamps to the DCC Bus

 




Although it may not be the best use of DCC power, can I use the DCC bus to power 12 volt incandescent lamps ?

 

How about using the DCC bus to power LEDs that provide light inside my structures?

 

Thanks.

 

Rich


Re: Wiring Accessory Lamps to the DCC Bus

redking56@...
 

Thanks, Glenn.

Is it as simple as just wiring the 12 volt incandescent bulbs to the DCC bus and adding the proper resistors to the LEDs?

Rich

Re: Wiring Accessory Lamps to the DCC Bus

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Rich,

You can use DCC power to operated incandescent bulbs, but the voltage rating needs to be 14-16 volts, not 12. Otherwise they will be extra bright and not last very long. An alternative would be to add a resistor or a couple of back-back diodes (~0.7to 1V drop in either direction of current) in series with the bulb to lower the actual voltage reaching a 12V rated bulb. A different method would be to use a single diode in series with the bulb to cut the average voltage down to ~7 Vdc. If you do this, be sure to alternate the connected polarity on multiple loads so as to even out + and – current load on the booster.

Yes, you can also use DCC track power to run LEDs, but be sure to use a diode to protect the LED from reverse voltage and a resistor to limit the current. LED loads are so small in milliamps that I wouldn’t worry about half-wave loads on the booster.

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Monday, September 15, 2014 5:38 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Wiring Accessory Lamps to the DCC Bus

 



Thanks, Glenn.

 

Is it as simple as just wiring the 12 volt incandescent bulbs to the DCC bus and adding the proper resistors to the LEDs?

 

Rich




Re: Wiring Accessory Lamps to the DCC Bus

redking56@...
 

Excellent info.

Thanks, Don.

Rich

Re: Wiring Accessory Lamps to the DCC Bus

jazzmanlj
 

Interesting idea I saw was using cheap solar outdoor lamps. Otherwise I'm planning on using dedicated 12 supplies. cheap enough on Ebay!

Len Jaskiewicz

Re: Wiring Accessory Lamps to the DCC Bus

Mark Cartwright
 

In my travels under the wire so to speak, I have been buying other people's layouts, sometimes nearly completed ones, some running on DCC.
All on the cheap.
>>>People whether they are running DC or DCC = Often create a totally separate circuit for illuminating their buildings. For many people it is a near after-thought anyway, requiring all new wiring.
===
One guy had a bunch of very small Train Set Transformers. He had sold off his entire fleet/layout to a guy who was trying to resell it all piece by piece and had no full idea what each part was worth...So after a year of such sales...basically what I left him with was N Scale Bachmann Snap Track, a Command 2000 DCC controller and about 20 of these train set transformers.  I had him throw in three on my deal. I have yet to use them, except to test individual buildings.
===
Instead, I have also picked up in my travels HO/O Scale larger transformers, which I intend to use.
Here is why > I prefer to run low voltage wire instead of the higher voltage wire around LAN Systems; as much as possible > So multiple small transformers with their own separate 110 volt wiring won't do for me.
Too much interference.
Local area network - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

I worked in a Silicon Valley Company, circa 1989 which was attempting to install a LAN System. The building was full of electronic gizmo's. Besides an interconnected system of circa 1989 IBM computers, we had various Security and Fire Systems in operation, various types of Intercoms, various types of whole house music systems and In Home Theaters. We found...rather they found > That having any sort of higher voltages wire too near some of these other systems (12-18 volt transformers) caused feedback. Hence they began to measure distance between the wires and learned never to bunch up transformers.
They also learned never to put the transformer into the same box as the electronics.
=
Some of the things this company did was install Gate Systems. Where a trench was dug from the house to several (perhaps hundreds) of yards away down to the front gate.
In the trench was high voltage wire, low voltage wire, intercom wire, lighting controls, video....Perhaps even a method for the local fire department to call in or upon a fire signal, the front gates would be thrown open. Sometimes the gate itself was valued at over $100,000k. The gates too were often full of metal and in their own were like a giant antenna.
===
The company I was with was charged with making it all work. 
My job was to just sell it and assure the customer that our people could make it all work.
Guess what? 
Well I can say they favored twisted pair shielded wire, through separate tubing at least 6 inches apart all the time with the tops of the wire, if in the ground below 18 inches. So they would dig the trench 24 just to favor no mistakes.
Shielded Twisted Pair?
Which can become a whole other debate on these forums.
===
Also in my travels on the cheap, I picked up twisted pair bell wire (nearly antique and not shielded.)
My intention so far is to run this separate wire to many of my buildings for their own lighting. 
Individually controlled by simple toggle switches.
Some as in very few maybe further enhanced with arduino and netuino drives.
Again these will be on yet another separate system.
============================================
In this regard > Has anybody tried out the new product from Woodland Scenics ?
Which has four plug in LED/SMD lights, each with their own rheostat. 
They are listed as O Scale, but I am fitting them under N Scale Buildings under their sabot base.
Woodland Scenics BA5790 White Light Kit | ModelTrainStuff.com

 

According to the description they already run on 16-20 VAC, so perhaps could be used as is on smaller layouts with DCC with a few buildings.
I tend to run three-five LEDS per building anyway > Even in N Scale. Or in Downtown Buildings which are close together and  if? ...> You don't do floors as I do....One could do four buildings.
In any event....Seems I will be upping my 12 volt lighted buildings to work on O Scale Transformers. 
Which somehow, I already own, again gathered in my cheap travels.
I was attempting to make my own individual circuit boards for each of my buildings when Woodland Scenics decided to offer a better design at cheaper prices to my Radio Shack components. 

Oops! again....Had I only waited just a few months.
===
Basically put, I don't believe in bunching up our various systems on one transformer on anything larger than what might be deemed as a train table or even the size of a coffee table.

Mark

Unidentified electronic Ckt breaker

Michael Sherbak
 

This was included in a used DCC system
I purchased
Was hoping some one could identify the brand/model so I know how to wire it
correctly and may put it in service.

Thanks for your help

Michael Sherbak

Re: Unidentified electronic Ckt breaker

Paul O
 

Michael, let us know when you’ve uploaded a picture of it to PHOTOS.

 

Paul O

Re: Unidentified electronic Ckt breaker

Glenn
 

Michael

Baring any photo graphs or scans, are there any markings on the circuit
breaker?

Also look at
https://ncedcc.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/201400305-EB1-Circuit-Breaker
https://ncedcc.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/201400195-EB3-Retired This one
has been retired, but still can be found.
http://www.digitrax.com/products/power-management/pm42/

Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 06:30
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Unidentified electronic Ckt breaker

This was included in a used DCC system
I purchased
Was hoping some one could identify the brand/model so I know how to wire it
correctly and may put it in service.

Thanks for your help

Michael Sherbak

Re: Unidentified electronic Ckt breaker

Michael Sherbak
 

I have posted photos of the top and bottom of the Device Michael Sherbak

Re: Unidentified electronic Ckt breaker

Dale Gloer
 

This is a DCC circuit Breaker.  It is the original OEM design sold by Tony's Train Exchange about 1998.  I have checked Tony's site - http://www.tonystrains.com/index.html - and cannot find a manual for it.  Your best bet is to contact Tony's and see if he can help you. 

I have 2 of them not in service.  The problem with them is that they are instant acting and cannot have the action time adjusted.

If you cannot find any documentation and wish to use them, contact me and I will see if I can find a users manual.

Dale Gloer

Re: Unidentified electronic Ckt breaker

Mark Gurries
 

On Sep 19, 2014, at 3:29 AM, Michael Sherbak @msherbak11 [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:
This was included in a used DCC system I purchased
Was hoping some one could identify the brand/model so I know how to wire it correctly and may put it in service.
It appears to be a very early DCC circuit breaker design from a company that appears to be out of business. In my quick search, I cannot find any internet information on the company “MicroDesign”.

What is unique about it is the use of PCB trace as a power resistor, the squiggly lines on the back side, to detect short circuit current flow to cut cost as opposed to using more accurate real power resistors.

I believe the RED device is a LED that lights up when the breaker has tripped. An external LED is optional. HOWEVER It looks like an external LED was used before for there appears to be a cut trace between the two wire holes for the external LED labeled “A” and “K” . In order for the PCB LED to work, you must now re-short the “A” and “K” terminals together -or- install another LED to the two wire terminals. The polarity of the LED is important. Get it backwards and none of the LEDs will work or work properly. Get jt right and both LED will glow brightly when on.

There two large holes which I believe is used to mount the PCB to some surface (wood) using some form of 1/4” tall standoff and an appropriate screw.

Given there is no documentation and I cannot look more carefully at the actual PCB board, I can only speculate on the connections based on the circuit I see. Specifically I cannot make out the hole names for the two holes used for the red and black wires. I WILL ASSUME the two wires hole labels are J3 and J3A.

There appear to be 2 sets of wire holes for input and output connections. Large wire holes J1, J2 and J3. Small wire holes J1A, J2A and J3A.

This implies there are electrically only 3 connections made to the PCB. The black wire is going to be a common connection between the input and the output made externally from the board. So you will need to “Y" the black wire into two wires to get the 2 in (booster) and 2 out (track) wire pairs.

AS SHOWN:

The Booster Red wire input to J3A.
The Booster Black wire input to J3.
The Track Red wire output to J1.

But there is something wrong with the above connections from what I can tell. There appears to be a small trace on the bottom shorting the J3A and the J3 as expected BUT as connected it is shorting the two Red and Black wires coming from the booster to each other shoring out the booster. It sort of appears the small PCB trace started to burn near the black wire…. VERY BAD. I think the J3A red wire coming from the booster is connected incorrectly.

MY WIRING SUGGESTION

Move the red wiring going to J3A to J2. This should remove the short. Make sure the red wire does not short to anything around the hole J2.

That makes the Booster/Track connections as follows:

The Booster Red wire input to J2 .
The Booster Black wire input to J3. (as currently done)
The Track Red wire output to J1. (as currently done.)

RECOMMENDATION

Given this is a early DCC circuit breaker design, it is not suitable for todays DCC locomotives with sound. It will shutdown prematurely. I would retire this board and purchase a new modern “High Current Inrush” capable DCC circuit breakers. There are two such products on the Market. The DCC Specialties PSX-1 and the NCE EB-1.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com