Date   
Re: Reality Check Needed - See File and/or Read Description

Flash Gordon
 

Steve,

Thanks for your reply. I understand how a conventional wye would work, but I am far from conventional.

Look in the photo section, if you list the albums by latest first my album should come up first. ( Ed S stuff).

Open the album and look at the "complete layout". At this point let me say my layout is geared to switching and making up trains. It will have two main tracks that will be kept clear while switching is taking place in the yards. DCC made this all possible.

At the bottom is the yard I am talking about. To the left is one leg of the wye and way over to the right is the other leg. You will see that there are two yards involved.

The left one is a passenger yard so I can back passenger cars into a station. The yard to the right is a freight yard for staging.

Neither leg is long enough for a lighted passenger train or a freight train with a lit caboose. Both legs need to lead into the yards so I can clear the main while cutting the cars.

My plan is to put gaps in the wye legs near the main line and consider all that yardage as one district, controlled by a circuit breaker / reverser. ( even a few tail light bulbs in critical areas). I am using an 8 amp booster for the whole layout with 4 amp circuit breakers for the large districts. Most of my engine are very old and some draw near one amp. So a lash-up or helper can draw two or three amps.

Once a train is in a yard, another train can enter the other yard so I could be working a passenger spotting and another person can be cutting freight cars.

I know it looks complicated but like I said I am not a conventional person.

Take a look and let me know if you see any errors in my logic. Next up is a triple cross over using two double slip switches and four turnouts that create another reverse.

Ed S

At 03:08 PM 2/6/2014, you wrote:



<<We all know that if you have a reverse loop, it has to be longer then the
length of a train with lighted cars.>>

<<I have a situation where a yard is part of a wye. This yard will have
lighted passenger cars or a caboose with markers.>>

<<My thinking is to is to isolate the whole yard with the wye and use a
reversing circuit breaker to control it.>>

Ed,

Don V. has given you a couple of good answers, they'll both work just fine.

There are, however, easier ways to handle this situation.

Your thoughts and Don's responses all center around reversing the yard on
that end of the wye.

Depending on how the other two legs of the wye connect with the rest of the
trackage, it may be easier to easier to use one of the other legs of the wye
for your reversing section.

Here's a simple example:

1) take a piece of paper and draw a large circle on it. At 11 o'clock and 1
o'clock, sketch in the two turnouts that split off the main and lead to the
yard you describe. Bring them down into the center of the layout, bring
them together at the third switch of the wye, and draw the yard below that.

2) Let's call the turnout at 11 o'clock turnout "A", the turnout at 1
0'clock "B", and the turnout that leads into the yard proper "C".

3) Cut double gaps between turnout "A" and "B" and "A" and "C", just to the
right of the frog of turnout "A".

4) Now move one train length counter clockwise from turnout "A" and place
another set of double gaps there. The length of track from this set of gaps
clockwise toward the two sets of gaps just beyond turnout "A" is your
reversing section. It's one train in length, and the resulting gaps are not
likely to be violated by another train.

Take the time to sketch it out - it works pretty good.

Best regards,

Steve Haas
Snoqualmie, WA

_

Re: Wiring a PIB100 with a 4pdt SWITCH

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

The use of a switch for the programming track is to allow you to alternately run Full DCC power OR Programming power/signals from the PTB100 on the same piece of track. One can simply use a DPDT switch so that the power for that track section comes from either the DCC bus system or the PTB100 programming booster. The basic idea is to be able to run a loco from normal parts of the layout directly onto the programming track. [No need to lift and adjust wheels.] But be aware that the multi-axle pick-up will temporarily connect DCC rail power onto the programming track as it rolls in under DCC power even when the toggle switch is set for 'programming'.

So the big question is... Will there be any damage to the PTB100 if one should connect full DCC track voltage power onto the programming track terminals? I for one am not willing to challenge that answer. You can create a rule and rely on your operators to NEVER allow a powered loco to run onto the programming track while the selector switch is set for programming [and you know how that will turn out], OR you can add positive protection to prevent that from happening by using another part of the same switch (3or4-PDT) to create a sufficient dead zone leading up to the programming track when the switch is set for programming so that cannot accidently happen.

My PTB100 is always connected also (to the switch). Run the loco in. flip the sw to Programming. Do whatever. Flip the sw back to Normal and run the loco out.

DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Tom
Sent: Thursday, February 06, 2014 10:18 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Wiring a PIB100 with a 4pdt SWITCH

Most of the times I have seen a reference to a 4pdt switch, it is being used to create a isolated section of track between the layout and the programming track to prevent locomotives from being connected to both the programming track and the powered main tracks of the layout at the same time

Are you trying to use it this way or to way to operate your programming track with or without your PTB100? For what it is worth my PTB100 is always connected

Tom in Texas



Tom in Texas

------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.comYahoo Groups Links

Re: DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?

john
 

Carl,
   A corner has to be a quarter the circumference of the circle (circle of track divided in half). Using the inside corner of your 2x2, the largest radius can only be around 20 inches and then only for you track is right on the edge of your modules. A second track would be about 17 inches/ maybe a tight 18, and so on. A 3x3 corner would give you almost a 36 inch radius for the outside track. With a 4x4 foot corner module you would have an 18 inch or better radius near the inside of your 2 foot module.  You could cookie cut the corner to minimize it some, you end up with a 6 sided module.
   For example, HO uses a 2 inch center but it has to increase to 2.5 in a curve because engines and cars hang over. You have to be at least an inch from the edge so if you had two tracks the inside track will be 1 + 2 +2.5 or 5.5 inches which makes the inside radius 24 -4.5 or 19.5 inches to the center of the inside track. You don't want track too close to the edge of any fall unless you plan to put in plastic guards. Graph paper is easier.
   I don't know the spacing of "O", "O-27", or O-N3, but I am sure it is more than double HO.
   I would suggest that you lay out your plan on graph paper, modules lay out nicely on it because the modules all have similar track layouts. Consider another problem or advantage, each module except the corner needs only two legs. When you go to train shows, look up the modular layouts, Ask the members where they screwed up and don't do that.
   Sorry so wordy.
john

From: Carl
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:31 AM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?



Hello John:

If HO layouts are built on 4x8 sheets of plywood, why can't you cut the plywood into eight 2x2 modules?

I know it might not match any module standard, but could fit some modules in a 4x8 space.

My O-27 modules matched no standards but their own. I had great fun sharing them and they met my needs at the time.

Carl.

On 2/4/2014 9:17 PM, john.p.dunn@... wrote:
 
Guys,
   2x2 modules won't work, corners have to be 4x4 for a 2xX foot layout.
john





Re: Wiring a PIB100 with a 4pdt SWITCH

Elliott Janofsky <ejanofsky@...>
 

Don and others, thanks for responses. What I'm trying to do is get the PTB 100 wired with the 4PDT switch so when I throw the switch to place my programming track into programing mode from layout track mode after driving an engine onto it, the PBB100 goes on as well. I can' t determine where the leads are placed relative to ;the switch. I don't want to combine track power with the PTB power. I want to know where the leads of the PTB must be placed. Thanks, Elliott Janofsky

-----Original Message-----
From: Vollrath, Don
Sent: Thursday, February 06, 2014 3:59 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Re: Wiring a PIB100 with a 4pdt SWITCH

The use of a switch for the programming track is to allow you to alternately run Full DCC power OR Programming power/signals from the PTB100 on the same piece of track. One can simply use a DPDT switch so that the power for that track section comes from either the DCC bus system or the PTB100 programming booster. The basic idea is to be able to run a loco from normal parts of the layout directly onto the programming track. [No need to lift and adjust wheels.] But be aware that the multi-axle pick-up will temporarily connect DCC rail power onto the programming track as it rolls in under DCC power even when the toggle switch is set for 'programming'.

So the big question is... Will there be any damage to the PTB100 if one should connect full DCC track voltage power onto the programming track terminals? I for one am not willing to challenge that answer. You can create a rule and rely on your operators to NEVER allow a powered loco to run onto the programming track while the selector switch is set for programming [and you know how that will turn out], OR you can add positive protection to prevent that from happening by using another part of the same switch (3or4-PDT) to create a sufficient dead zone leading up to the programming track when the switch is set for programming so that cannot accidently happen.

My PTB100 is always connected also (to the switch). Run the loco in. flip the sw to Programming. Do whatever. Flip the sw back to Normal and run the loco out.

DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Tom
Sent: Thursday, February 06, 2014 10:18 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Wiring a PIB100 with a 4pdt SWITCH

Most of the times I have seen a reference to a 4pdt switch, it is being used to create a isolated section of track between the layout and the programming track to prevent locomotives from being connected to both the programming track and the powered main tracks of the layout at the same time

Are you trying to use it this way or to way to operate your programming track with or without your PTB100? For what it is worth my PTB100 is always connected

Tom in Texas



Tom in Texas

------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.comYahoo Groups Links







------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.comYahoo Groups Links

Re: DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?

Carl
 

Hello John:

Let's try again. This 24" x24" module is for home use. Putting the outside track 2" from the edge would give you a 22" radius. The second track less 2.5" would be 19.5" radius, still larger than the 18" radius that comes with sets. Now this doesn't allow for bridge track, but even this bridge track could be curved.

The goal is to help someone have some fun at home. My suggestion was to build small modules and not be stuck with a 4x8 foot table. I built modules for O-27 track ( 13.5 radius ) and put the two mainlines 6" apart. I also displayed them at many train shows including two National Conventions. I do look at the other module set ups for ideas.

Build something. Have fun.

Carl.
Sent from my NOOK

john.p.dunn@... wrote:

 

Carl,
   A corner has to be a quarter the circumference of the circle (circle of track divided in half). Using the inside corner of your 2x2, the largest radius can only be around 20 inches and then only for you track is right on the edge of your modules. A second track would be about 17 inches/ maybe a tight 18, and so on. A 3x3 corner would give you almost a 36 inch radius for the outside track. With a 4x4 foot corner module you would have an 18 inch or better radius near the inside of your 2 foot module.  You could cookie cut the corner to minimize it some, you end up with a 6 sided module.
   For example, HO uses a 2 inch center but it has to increase to 2.5 in a curve because engines and cars hang over. You have to be at least an inch from the edge so if you had two tracks the inside track will be 1 + 2 +2.5 or 5.5 inches which makes the inside radius 24 -4.5 or 19.5 inches to the center of the inside track. You don't want track too close to the edge of any fall unless you plan to put in plastic guards. Graph paper is easier.
   I don't know the spacing of "O", "O-27", or O-N3, but I am sure it is more than double HO.
   I would suggest that you lay out your plan on graph paper, modules lay out nicely on it because the modules all have similar track layouts. Consider another problem or advantage, each module except the corner needs only two legs. When you go to train shows, look up the modular layouts, Ask the members where they screwed up and don't do that.
   Sorry so wordy.
john

From: Carl <carl.blum@...>
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:31 AM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?



Hello John:

If HO layouts are built on 4x8 sheets of plywood, why can't you cut the plywood into eight 2x2 modules?

I know it might not match any module standard, but could fit some modules in a 4x8 space.

My O-27 modules matched no standards but their own. I had great fun sharing them and they met my needs at the time.

Carl.

On 2/4/2014 9:17 PM, john.p.dunn@... wrote:
 
Guys,
   2x2 modules won't work, corners have to be 4x4 for a 2xX foot layout.
john





Re: DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?

Chuck Stiles
 

Carl

Another option to consider: see the pictures I posted of the tilted table construction, I am in the process of building to save space
The table fits thru a 36 wide door folded. its 5 x 8 but easily could be 5 x 9. I can roll it around the garage to get it out of the way, and it fits inside my trailer for transport. You just pull two pins and tilt it to the side.

Chuck



On Thursday, February 6, 2014 2:41 PM, "john.p.dunn@..." wrote:
 
Carl,
   A corner has to be a quarter the circumference of the circle (circle of track divided in half). Using the inside corner of your 2x2, the largest radius can only be around 20 inches and then only for you track is right on the edge of your modules. A second track would be about 17 inches/ maybe a tight 18, and so on. A 3x3 corner would give you almost a 36 inch radius for the outside track. With a 4x4 foot corner module you would have an 18 inch or better radius near the inside of your 2 foot module.  You could cookie cut the corner to minimize it some, you end up with a 6 sided module.
   For example, HO uses a 2 inch center but it has to increase to 2.5 in a curve because engines and cars hang over. You have to be at least an inch from the edge so if you had two tracks the inside track will be 1 + 2 +2.5 or 5.5 inches which makes the inside radius 24 -4.5 or 19.5 inches to the center of the inside track. You don't want track too close to the edge of any fall unless you plan to put in plastic guards. Graph paper is easier.
   I don't know the spacing of "O", "O-27", or O-N3, but I am sure it is more than double HO.
   I would suggest that you lay out your plan on graph paper, modules lay out nicely on it because the modules all have similar track layouts. Consider another problem or advantage, each module except the corner needs only two legs. When you go to train shows, look up the modular layouts, Ask the members where they screwed up and don't do that.
   Sorry so wordy.
john
From: Carl
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:31 AM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?



Hello John:

If HO layouts are built on 4x8 sheets of plywood, why can't you cut the plywood into eight 2x2 modules?

I know it might not match any module standard, but could fit some modules in a 4x8 space.

My O-27 modules matched no standards but their own. I had great fun sharing them and they met my needs at the time.

Carl.

On 2/4/2014 9:17 PM, john.p.dunn@... wrote:
 
Guys,
   2x2 modules won't work, corners have to be 4x4 for a 2xX foot layout.
john







Re: DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?

john
 

Carl,
   I find it amazing how the O gauges can make those tight radii, I have a little narrow gauge G layout and it is the same. My mind set is on HO and big HO engines are not happy on small radius turns and to be honest I like panorama even on a portable layout.
   There is definitely room for everyone and their ideas. To be honest, I wouldn't be having nearly as much fun without what I have learned from everyone else.john

From: Carl Blum
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:26 PM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?



Hello John:

Let's try again. This 24" x24" module is for home use. Putting the outside track 2" from the edge would give you a 22" radius. The second track less 2.5" would be 19.5" radius, still larger than the 18" radius that comes with sets. Now this doesn't allow for bridge track, but even this bridge track could be curved.

The goal is to help someone have some fun at home. My suggestion was to build small modules and not be stuck with a 4x8 foot table. I built modules for O-27 track ( 13.5 radius ) and put the two mainlines 6" apart. I also displayed them at many train shows including two National Conventions. I do look at the other module set ups for ideas.

Build something. Have fun.

Carl.
Sent from my NOOK

john.p.dunn@... wrote:

 
Carl,
   A corner has to be a quarter the circumference of the circle (circle of track divided in half). Using the inside corner of your 2x2, the largest radius can only be around 20 inches and then only for you track is right on the edge of your modules. A second track would be about 17 inches/ maybe a tight 18, and so on. A 3x3 corner would give you almost a 36 inch radius for the outside track. With a 4x4 foot corner module you would have an 18 inch or better radius near the inside of your 2 foot module.  You could cookie cut the corner to minimize it some, you end up with a 6 sided module.
   For example, HO uses a 2 inch center but it has to increase to 2.5 in a curve because engines and cars hang over. You have to be at least an inch from the edge so if you had two tracks the inside track will be 1 + 2 +2.5 or 5.5 inches which makes the inside radius 24 -4.5 or 19.5 inches to the center of the inside track. You don't want track too close to the edge of any fall unless you plan to put in plastic guards. Graph paper is easier.
   I don't know the spacing of "O", "O-27", or O-N3, but I am sure it is more than double HO.
   I would suggest that you lay out your plan on graph paper, modules lay out nicely on it because the modules all have similar track layouts. Consider another problem or advantage, each module except the corner needs only two legs. When you go to train shows, look up the modular layouts, Ask the members where they screwed up and don't do that.
   Sorry so wordy.
john
From: Carl
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:31 AM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?



Hello John:

If HO layouts are built on 4x8 sheets of plywood, why can't you cut the plywood into eight 2x2 modules?

I know it might not match any module standard, but could fit some modules in a 4x8 space.

My O-27 modules matched no standards but their own. I had great fun sharing them and they met my needs at the time.

Carl.

On 2/4/2014 9:17 PM, john.p.dunn@... wrote:
 
Guys,
   2x2 modules won't work, corners have to be 4x4 for a 2xX foot layout.
john









Re: DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?

Carl
 

Hi Chuck:

I do like your tip up layout. Wiring with it up should be nice. And I like the storage too.

For now I have a "finished" layout.

Thanks, Carl.
Sent from my NOOK

Chuck Stiles <capnchuck@...> wrote:

 

Carl

Another option to consider: see the pictures I posted of the tilted table construction, I am in the process of building to save space
The table fits thru a 36 wide door folded. its 5 x 8 but easily could be 5 x 9. I can roll it around the garage to get it out of the way, and it fits inside my trailer for transport. You just pull two pins and tilt it to the side.

Chuck



On Thursday, February 6, 2014 2:41 PM, "john.p.dunn@..." <john.p.dunn@...> wrote:
 
Carl,
   A corner has to be a quarter the circumference of the circle (circle of track divided in half). Using the inside corner of your 2x2, the largest radius can only be around 20 inches and then only for you track is right on the edge of your modules. A second track would be about 17 inches/ maybe a tight 18, and so on. A 3x3 corner would give you almost a 36 inch radius for the outside track. With a 4x4 foot corner module you would have an 18 inch or better radius near the inside of your 2 foot module.  You could cookie cut the corner to minimize it some, you end up with a 6 sided module.
   For example, HO uses a 2 inch center but it has to increase to 2.5 in a curve because engines and cars hang over. You have to be at least an inch from the edge so if you had two tracks the inside track will be 1 + 2 +2.5 or 5.5 inches which makes the inside radius 24 -4.5 or 19.5 inches to the center of the inside track. You don't want track too close to the edge of any fall unless you plan to put in plastic guards. Graph paper is easier.
   I don't know the spacing of "O", "O-27", or O-N3, but I am sure it is more than double HO.
   I would suggest that you lay out your plan on graph paper, modules lay out nicely on it because the modules all have similar track layouts. Consider another problem or advantage, each module except the corner needs only two legs. When you go to train shows, look up the modular layouts, Ask the members where they screwed up and don't do that.
   Sorry so wordy.
john
From: Carl <carl.blum@...>
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:31 AM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?



Hello John:

If HO layouts are built on 4x8 sheets of plywood, why can't you cut the plywood into eight 2x2 modules?

I know it might not match any module standard, but could fit some modules in a 4x8 space.

My O-27 modules matched no standards but their own. I had great fun sharing them and they met my needs at the time.

Carl.

On 2/4/2014 9:17 PM, john.p.dunn@... wrote:
 
Guys,
   2x2 modules won't work, corners have to be 4x4 for a 2xX foot layout.
john







Re: DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?

Carl
 

Hi John:

O-27 are the charming toy trains. They are fun, but everything looks better on wider curves. For my home layout the minimum radius is 48". Come for a visit.

Carl.
Sent from my NOOK

john.p.dunn@... wrote:

 

Carl,
   I find it amazing how the O gauges can make those tight radii, I have a little narrow gauge G layout and it is the same. My mind set is on HO and big HO engines are not happy on small radius turns and to be honest I like panorama even on a portable layout.
   There is definitely room for everyone and their ideas. To be honest, I wouldn't be having nearly as much fun without what I have learned from everyone else.john

From: Carl Blum <carl.blum@...>
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:26 PM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?



Hello John:

Let's try again. This 24" x24" module is for home use. Putting the outside track 2" from the edge would give you a 22" radius. The second track less 2.5" would be 19.5" radius, still larger than the 18" radius that comes with sets. Now this doesn't allow for bridge track, but even this bridge track could be curved.

The goal is to help someone have some fun at home. My suggestion was to build small modules and not be stuck with a 4x8 foot table. I built modules for O-27 track ( 13.5 radius ) and put the two mainlines 6" apart. I also displayed them at many train shows including two National Conventions. I do look at the other module set ups for ideas.

Build something. Have fun.

Carl.
Sent from my NOOK

john.p.dunn@... wrote:

 
Carl,
   A corner has to be a quarter the circumference of the circle (circle of track divided in half). Using the inside corner of your 2x2, the largest radius can only be around 20 inches and then only for you track is right on the edge of your modules. A second track would be about 17 inches/ maybe a tight 18, and so on. A 3x3 corner would give you almost a 36 inch radius for the outside track. With a 4x4 foot corner module you would have an 18 inch or better radius near the inside of your 2 foot module.  You could cookie cut the corner to minimize it some, you end up with a 6 sided module.
   For example, HO uses a 2 inch center but it has to increase to 2.5 in a curve because engines and cars hang over. You have to be at least an inch from the edge so if you had two tracks the inside track will be 1 + 2 +2.5 or 5.5 inches which makes the inside radius 24 -4.5 or 19.5 inches to the center of the inside track. You don't want track too close to the edge of any fall unless you plan to put in plastic guards. Graph paper is easier.
   I don't know the spacing of "O", "O-27", or O-N3, but I am sure it is more than double HO.
   I would suggest that you lay out your plan on graph paper, modules lay out nicely on it because the modules all have similar track layouts. Consider another problem or advantage, each module except the corner needs only two legs. When you go to train shows, look up the modular layouts, Ask the members where they screwed up and don't do that.
   Sorry so wordy.
john
From: Carl <carl.blum@...>
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:31 AM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC journey What is best for your Father's Son?



Hello John:

If HO layouts are built on 4x8 sheets of plywood, why can't you cut the plywood into eight 2x2 modules?

I know it might not match any module standard, but could fit some modules in a 4x8 space.

My O-27 modules matched no standards but their own. I had great fun sharing them and they met my needs at the time.

Carl.

On 2/4/2014 9:17 PM, john.p.dunn@... wrote:
 
Guys,
   2x2 modules won't work, corners have to be 4x4 for a 2xX foot layout.
john









ST&E Tray Modules = My Father's Son's N Scale layout.

Mark Cartwright
 

Hi, 


Thought I would share my concept of tray modules  - So uploaded a few pictures. They are in the Stockton, Tuolumne and Eastern folder.  These are mostly 16' x 24" modules - Not much bigger than a dinner tray. They are designed with the use of Kato Unitrak.   They are a half inch inside diameter.  The inside can hold battery holders and other lighting controls. Also you can see how one tray module can be lifted out and carried to a workbench of added detail. (Sorry, these photos may have a different central theme. - They were taken to show mostly what is on top of them - Not the tray module itself.)
=
The actual layout is on a whole different floor of my house. They were designed to be easily moved. for many reasons. The kato unitrak for the most part floats on top of them and can also quickly be disassembled.  I tend to mock up 10 at a time, experiment with grades and track, as I attempt to fit buildings. Landscaping to be filled in at a much later date.
==
Just for a bit of knowledge. My two computer systems came out with a Grade of 2 % at around 100 inches. However, by decreasing this grade a smidgen, adding a short length of track to each end of a turnout or curve - Made for a much smoother transition .. Seems my N Scale locomotives have no issues at less than a 2% grade. II highly recommend it.   The 5 tray modules changed to a 115 inches.  - 4 - 16" x24" tray modules and the final corner one became 16" x  20 inches.  This fits the widest ready made double curve from kato from a V-16. This transitions around into a set of switches over an inside track with a crossover. Beyond this and around another curve comes a V-17 set towards a High Speed Rail System perched above the traffic below. 

Wiring this all for DCC? Well Good Luck with that! 
So far I am running it in batches as I build.
:)) Mark

Moderator: Please stay on topic. The subject is wiring for DCC.

Mark Gurries
 

Please stay on topic.  Discussion of module mechanical design is not a compatible subject line with this group.  There are other groups for that.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Emergency stop button

Flash Gordon
 

If you do not have one, here is a good one cheap. But it took 3 weeks to get to my house.


It is well built:  Single pole  660V  10A

http://www.ebay.com/itm/130970913952?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649

Ed S


Re: Emergency stop button

Carl
 

Hello Ed:

I have one already. What are you attaching yours to?

Carl.

On 2/8/2014 1:40 PM, eschwerkolt@... wrote:
 

If you do not have one, here is a good one cheap. But it took 3 weeks to get to my house.


It is well built:  Single pole  660V  10A


Ed S

Re: Emergency stop button

Flash Gordon
 

Carl,

It will control the main power to the entire layout.  That way if I have any kind of problem I can do a quick shut down.


Ed S



At 01:45 PM 2/8/2014, you wrote:
 

Hello Ed:

I have one already. What are you attaching yours to?

Carl.

Re: Emergency stop button

Max Maginness
 

Such a switch should be rated the current capacity of the circuit. Most house circuits are at least 15 Amp. These switches are rated for 10A. If there is a major 120v short it will pull out the panel circuit breaker. A partial overload but within the circuit breaker rating may not be handled by this switch.

 

Max

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Carl
Sent: Saturday, February 08, 2014 10:45 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Emergency stop button

 

 

Hello Ed:

I have one already. What are you attaching yours to?

Carl.

On 2/8/2014 1:40 PM, eschwerkolt@... wrote:

 

If you do not have one, here is a good one cheap. But it took 3 weeks to get to my house.

 

It is well built:  Single pole  660V  10A

 

 

Ed S

 


No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 10.0.1432 / Virus Database: 3697/6575 - Release Date: 02/08/14

Re: Emergency stop button

rt_coker@...
 

I use a single button remote controlled AC power switch ~$13, and where the remote control around my neck.  The ability to quickly kill track power no matter where I am has already saved me a number of times.

Bob

Re: Emergency stop button

Flash Gordon
 

Bob'

That sounds even better ... I would have to be careful not to push the life-lock alert button though.

Do you have a source?

Ed S

At 04:21 PM 2/8/2014, you wrote:


I use a single button remote controlled AC power switch ~$13, and where the remote control around my neck. The ability to quickly kill track power no matter where I am has already saved me a number of times.

Bob

Re: Emergency stop button

rt_coker@...
 

I use a single button remote controlled AC power switch ~$13, and where the remote control around my neck.  The ability to quickly kill track power no matter where I am has already saved me a number of times.

Bob

 

Re: Emergency stop button

Carl
 

Hi Max:

In industrial equipment an Emergency Stop Button controls a relay that has the capacity to interrupt the current. Usually it is wired to "fail to OFF". This would mean current would flow through the Stop Button to hold the relay "ON". Thus if the wire to the Stop Button broke, the machine would forced to stop.

Carl.

Re: Emergency stop button

Max Maginness
 

Hi Carl,

  Exactly, but there has been no  mention of a relay in this thread (until now)

 

Max

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Carl
Sent: Sunday, February 09, 2014 12:03 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Emergency stop button

 

 

Hi Max:

In industrial equipment an Emergency Stop Button controls a relay that has the capacity to interrupt the current. Usually it is wired to "fail to OFF". This would mean current would flow through the Stop Button to hold the relay "ON". Thus if the wire to the Stop Button broke, the machine would forced to stop.

Carl.


No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 10.0.1432 / Virus Database: 3697/6578 - Release Date: 02/09/14