Date   
Re: DCC Track Design for review

Brian Eiland
 






I still don't see "files" on either of these pages??

Sorry, Perhaps I'm just computer 'challenged'
Brian







10 Amp Vs 5 Amp Vs 3 Amps for your layout.

Mark Cartwright
 

Hi all, 


I have more complicated questions... But first I believe we need to agree on some facts, which I am honestly hazy on.
===
First > Depending on your scale > Which amperage is needed and optimized?
Nearly guessing here...
3 amps for N Scale
5 amps for HO Scale
10 Amps for G....
? Or is this even applicable today.
===
Here is the other shoe to drop.... If I have a large layout of over 400 square feet of track stretched around a 21 x 60 foot rectangle. Would it be best to start off at 10 amps and hope the power gets all the way around or use small 3-5 amp boosters for a N Scale layout expecting to run upwards of 12 trains at a time.

Thank you for listening,
:)) Mark

===========
As for fire... I have personally witnessed 12 volt wiring on a 10 amp circuit basically burst into flame as it shorted near a gasoline line. Prior to 1973, it was not unusual to find Manufacturers running 12 volt wiring through the same chase as a gasoline line. A major difference between the 1972 vs the 1973 BMW 2002. Once, I learned this fact many years ago, I tended to be careful in choosing any car made prior to 1973, I wouldn't own a pre-1973 BMW and rewired a 1963 Panel Truck to the wiring diagram of a 1973 BMW 2002. There was also a practice in use  of the old days of varying wiring gauge, even in 110 volt circuits. Again a practice I tried to avoid and will replace a circuit with one type of gauge with fewer splices or connections. This maybe a factor more on a 10 amp circuit than a 3 amp circuit.

I also tend to separate wiring to type and other use. Such communication wiring being separated from power lighting. We have an additional consideration with DCC wiring.

The Construction methods of the day in the 1906 SF Earthquake place natural gas lines in the same pockets at the new to the day electrical wiring. It was fires and explosions which were the most fatal for San Francisco. Sort of like saying it was not the Hurricane but the flood which harmed New Orleans during Katrina then followed by lawlessness.

Meaning > There is a fire extinguisher near my layout and I am working on a fail-proof method of turning off all power to my layout - As I leave the room.

Re: 10 Amp Vs 5 Amp Vs 3 Amps for your layout.

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Mark,

Your synopsis for power supply amps is good for starters. Include S scale in the 5 amp group and O scale with the 10 amp G scalers. Obviously it is not just the scale, but the physical size of the layout and how many trains you intend to run at the same time that determines the need for power and long voltage loss wiring runs.

 

For your 21 x 60 ft around the room layout, I would split it up to use two 5 amp boosters rather than a single 10 amp unit. Divide the layout into two equally sized booster districts and place each booster roughly midway between the ends of each district to minimize the wiring distance from booster to track droppers. Use 12-14 ga DCC bus wiring. Splitting the booster districts into several circuit breaker protected power district sub-buses to isolate switching areas from main lines is also a good idea. Three 5 amp boosters would be overkill for N scale as you will not need that much power.

 

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of marcdecapri@...
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2014 7:03 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] 10 Amp Vs 5 Amp Vs 3 Amps for your layout.

 



Hi all, 

 

I have more complicated questions... But first I believe we need to agree on some facts, which I am honestly hazy on.

===

First > Depending on your scale > Which amperage is needed and optimized?

Nearly guessing here...

3 amps for N Scale

5 amps for HO Scale

10 Amps for G....

? Or is this even applicable today.

===

Here is the other shoe to drop.... If I have a large layout of over 400 square feet of track stretched around a 21 x 60 foot rectangle. Would it be best to start off at 10 amps and hope the power gets all the way around or use small 3-5 amp boosters for a N Scale layout expecting to run upwards of 12 trains at a time.

 

Thank you for listening,

:)) Mark

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Paul O
 

Here is a direct link to the PDF:

http://tinyurl.com/k5pq7xp

 

Paul O

 

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of railandsail
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2014 4:20 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC Track Design for review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I still don't see "files" on either of these pages??

 

Sorry, Perhaps I'm just computer 'challenged'

Brian

 

 

 

 

 

 

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Paul O
 

Brian, the file is not on the ‘Wiringfordcc.com’ web site, it on the Yahoo Group WiringforDCC site.

 

Paul O

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of railandsail
Sent: Thursday, January 23, 2014 4:20 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC Track Design for review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I still don't see "files" on either of these pages??

 

Sorry, Perhaps I'm just computer 'challenged'

Brian

 

 

 

 

 

 

Re: DCC Wiring - Can it cause a fire?

Flash Gordon
 


Steve,

I must admit I was also confused by your use of the term "fouling point" because I was thinking in model scale track laying. I am ashamed for not seeing your logic at first because I was also a real time switchman.

We always had to be sure spotted cars did not foul the main. The method was to stand over the rail with one foot on each side and stick out your arm to be sure it did not touch the car in question.

I have a feeling you were also a railroader do to your reference to the “beanery”. I worked on the “Snake” Southern Pacific in the San Francisco area in the 60’s; specifically the Alameda Belt line.

Thanks for your tip on model railroading and be sure to not walk on the “ball” of the rail.

Headed for the barn,
Ed S


At 02:20 AM 1/23/2014, you wrote:
 

In response to my comment:

 

“  . . . keep those gaps inside the fouling point of your turnouts and equipment and it will reduce the number of problems due to shorts by reducing the possibility of shorts.”,

 

Bob inquired:

“Are you suggesting gaps closer to or farther from the frog?  Could you explain what you mean with a little more detail? Or point us to a diagram or discussion.>>

 

I’d be glad to, Bob.

The Fouling point is the location where equipment on the diverging tracks of a turnout would sideswipe each other.  Trains & equipment need to be spotted beyond the fouling point so equipment can move into/out of the adjacent track without sideswiping each other.

Starting from the point end of a turn out, you have points, frog, fouling point.  Your gaps go between the frog and the fouling point.  These gaps should be as close to the frog as is reasonably possible given the track construction methods used. 

The rationale is this – In theory, (most, there are always exceptions <>) operators will keep equipment beyond the fouling point so trains don’t snag on each other.  If they do that (as they should), and the gaps are between the frog and the fouling point, the metal wheels of stopped equipment are unlikely to span the gap, potentially creating a short if the turnout is thrown against the equipment spanning that gap.

 

We had an incident on a local layout where this actually occurred.  Track was hand laid, and one side of the frog extended about six inches down the yard track.  A train entered the track from the far end of the yard and pulled down to the far end, where it stopped with one of its front wheels spanning the frog gap.  As the engineer was moving slow, he was almost stopped when tht axle spanned that gap, and didn’t notice that he’d straddled the gap.  The turnout was against him, so the frog was one polarity and the rail under the train the opposite.   Additionally this was the last train of the session, so the short went completely un-noticed.  The layout was shut down and we went to beans.  Several work sessions passed where we had track power on for various reasons.  When we finally went to move the train for re-staging purposes, it wouldn’t move.  Inspection revealed that the gear on the front axle had gotten so hot that the plastic had flowed around the bearing block on that side of the axle, and had cooled around the bearing block effectively freezing the mechanism.  Layout owner, not realizing that any of this had happened, attempted to move the train by turning up speed on throttle.  Only thing that happened is track to decoder and decoder to motor wiring got hot and the insulation burned off.

All of this would have been avoided if the gaps had placed properly  (between the frog and the fouling point originally.

 

Best regards,

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Brian Eiland
 

I guess I'm just confused by all the 'stuff' left in each email. Nobody tends to clean up all this extraneous mess that comes with each email notice,...and those very similar addresses are confusing to me.

I participate on a number of boating forums that are much clearer than this yahoo stuff,(to me anyway). And this RR forum is easier for me to understand....layout I once had....
http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/forum/showthread.php?8141-Problems-with-quot-The-Central-Midland-quot-Atlas-HO-29-layout-w-Pics/page2

Here is a 5x9 layout I once saw on Ebay and thought to buy. It seems to offer a lot in a relatively small footprint. Lets see if I can attach a photo to this forum discussion?...no, but here is a link
http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/forum/showthread.php?29478-Need-Ideas-for-HO-Layout-for-5-x-10ft-Table&p=331236#post331236

I had wanted to see your choice of a layout, but having trouble getting to the photo/dwg
Brian





On Thu, Jan 23, 2014 at 12:31 PM, Paul O <pomilian@...> wrote:
 
Brian, the file is not on the ‘Wiringfordcc.com’ web site, it on the Yahoo Group WiringforDCC site.

Paul O

 

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Chuck Stiles
 

Brian

This should be a direct link to the file i posted on Yahoo Groups it will require a PDF viewer to open

http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v2/ZLHiUrd_AnK-SGcVw26XSTp8uzhY3crYJFdvdgJt5tYG8oyU0YEPI8TahnklowCrnmbZZz24yD9a96glc37ABzT1iHYpFITa3qZbUr7TD3vt6r0CoEHfXQryCy8P2G1vaz93lsI7MdEK/Final%20Layout%20for%20review.pdf

I posted this in hopes for review from a DCC point of view in the design and provisions I made for power feeds on the layout etc. I was hoping for constructive criticism.

I also uploaded in the pictures section photo's of the tilted table construction

Hope This Helps

Chuck Stiles
NJ



On Thursday, January 23, 2014 10:47 PM, railandsail wrote:
 
I guess I'm just confused by all the 'stuff' left in each email. Nobody tends to clean up all this extraneous mess that comes with each email notice,...and those very similar addresses are confusing to me.

I participate on a number of boating forums that are much clearer than this yahoo stuff,(to me anyway). And this RR forum is easier for me to understand....layout I once had....
http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/forum/showthread.php?8141-Problems-with-quot-The-Central-Midland-quot-Atlas-HO-29-layout-w-Pics/page2

Here is a 5x9 layout I once saw on Ebay and thought to buy. It seems to offer a lot in a relatively small footprint. Lets see if I can attach a photo to this forum discussion?...no, but here is a link
http://www.modelrailroadforums.com/forum/showthread.php?29478-Need-Ideas-for-HO-Layout-for-5-x-10ft-Table&p=331236#post331236

I had wanted to see your choice of a layout, but having trouble getting to the photo/dwg
Brian





On Thu, Jan 23, 2014 at 12:31 PM, Paul O <pomilian@...> wrote:
 
Brian, the file is not on the ‘Wiringfordcc.com’ web site, it on the Yahoo Group WiringforDCC site.
Paul O
 


Re: DCC Track Design for review

Flash Gordon
 

Chuck,

That link did not work for me but I did find the pdf in the file section once I got the correct name.

Final Layout for review.PDF

Looks good to me, very similar to a layout I am building.

Ed S

Re: DCC Track Design for review

george hohon3
 

Just a comment . . . And much to my surprise, a true story.

A couple years back, I started a new layout and made the decision it would DCC throughout.  It's relatively small, a HO double deck plan in 12' x 14' extra bedroom.  I studied all the files, went to DCC clinics at a number of conventions, and built the layout using the recommended wiring practices.

Upon completing the track work, which includes a twelve track fiddle yard, multiple DCC friendly  turnouts, cross-overs, and sidings, I was tickled pink that first train navigated every inch of track without so much as a hiccup.

Jump ahead a couple of years and I'm facing an expansion of the layout into an adjacent room.  A review of the wiring was needed and during that exercise I discovered I did not complete all the recommended wiring practices, as stated by "the experts" from a couple of years back.

My discovery?  Well, much to my surprise (even though the entire layout had a main power bus under every foot of length) . . . There was only ONE pair of track feeder wires powering the entire layout!  One and only one.  Two years of running multiple trains and never a power problem.

We're the experts wrong?  Or was I just lucky?  Or what?  I doubt a specific answer will ever present itself, and I'm sure there will be opinions galore.

As for me and the layout and the discovered omission . . . I say I'll let this sleeping dog rest where he is and do nothing to upset him.

My conclusion to all of this discussion is this . . . DCC is the simplest wiring required for any model railroad.  As long as you don't over think it.  Like they say, "KISS!"

George


On Jan 24, 2014, at 12:19 PM, "Ed S" <eschwerkolt@...> wrote:

 

Chuck,

That link did not work for me but I did find the pdf in the file
section once I got the correct name.

Final Layout for review.PDF

Looks good to me, very similar to a layout I am building.

Ed S

At 01:37 PM 1/24/2014, you wrote:
>http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v2/ZLHiUrd_AnK-SGcVw26XSTp8uzhY3crYJFdvdgJt5tYG8oyU0YEPI8TahnklowCrnmbZZz24yD9a96glc37ABzT1iHYpFITa3qZbUr7TD3vt6r0CoEHfXQryCy8P2G1vaz93lsI7MdEK/Final%20Layout%20for%20review.pdf

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Bernie Halloran
 

George, 
To answer your question, stick your head out your window tonight and look up.  That pulsating dinner plate looking thing hovering over your house is providing power to your layout, not those two wires.

When it returns to deep space, you'll be in deep trouble.

Bernie Halloran
NYK&W

On Jan 24, 2014, at 18:21, "george hohon3" <hohon3@...> wrote:

 

Just a comment . . . And much to my surprise, a true story.

A couple years back, I started a new layout and made the decision it would DCC throughout.  It's relatively small, a HO double deck plan in 12' x 14' extra bedroom.  I studied all the files, went to DCC clinics at a number of conventions, and built the layout using the recommended wiring practices.

Upon completing the track work, which includes a twelve track fiddle yard, multiple DCC friendly  turnouts, cross-overs, and sidings, I was tickled pink that first train navigated every inch of track without so much as a hiccup.

Jump ahead a couple of years and I'm facing an expansion of the layout into an adjacent room.  A review of the wiring was needed and during that exercise I discovered I did not complete all the recommended wiring practices, as stated by "the experts" from a couple of years back.

My discovery?  Well, much to my surprise (even though the entire layout had a main power bus under every foot of length) . . . There was only ONE pair of track feeder wires powering the entire layout!  One and only one.  Two years of running multiple trains and never a power problem.

We're the experts wrong?  Or was I just lucky?  Or what?  I doubt a specific answer will ever present itself, and I'm sure there will be opinions galore.

As for me and the layout and the discovered omission . . . I say I'll let this sleeping dog rest where he is and do nothing to upset him.

My conclusion to all of this discussion is this . . . DCC is the simplest wiring required for any model railroad.  As long as you don't over think it.  Like they say, "KISS!"

George


On Jan 24, 2014, at 12:19 PM, "Ed S" <eschwerkolt@...> wrote:

 

Chuck,

That link did not work for me but I did find the pdf in the file
section once I got the correct name.

Final Layout for review.PDF

Looks good to me, very similar to a layout I am building.

Ed S

At 01:37 PM 1/24/2014, you wrote:
>http://f1.grp.yahoofs.com/v2/ZLHiUrd_AnK-SGcVw26XSTp8uzhY3crYJFdvdgJt5tYG8oyU0YEPI8TahnklowCrnmbZZz24yD9a96glc37ABzT1iHYpFITa3qZbUr7TD3vt6r0CoEHfXQryCy8P2G1vaz93lsI7MdEK/Final%20Layout%20for%20review.pdf

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Brian Eiland
 

Thanks for that submission George. Since you obviously did a lot of research before you built your layout, are there any other reasons you might have for your lace of problems with just the single pair of track feeder wires??.....perhaps the size of your main power (bus) wiring?...or other?
Brian

**********************************************************************


On Fri, Jan 24, 2014 at 6:21 PM, george hohon3 <hohon3@...> wrote:
 

Just a comment . . . And much to my surprise, a true story.

A couple years back, I started a new layout and made the decision it would DCC throughout.  It's relatively small, a HO double deck plan in 12' x 14' extra bedroom.  I studied all the files, went to DCC clinics at a number of conventions, and built the layout using the recommended wiring practices.

Upon completing the track work, which includes a twelve track fiddle yard, multiple DCC friendly  turnouts, cross-overs, and sidings, I was tickled pink that first train navigated every inch of track without so much as a hiccup.

Jump ahead a couple of years and I'm facing an expansion of the layout into an adjacent room.  A review of the wiring was needed and during that exercise I discovered I did not complete all the recommended wiring practices, as stated by "the experts" from a couple of years back.

My discovery?  Well, much to my surprise (even though the entire layout had a main power bus under every foot of length) . . . There was only ONE pair of track feeder wires powering the entire layout!  One and only one.  Two years of running multiple trains and never a power problem.

We're the experts wrong?  Or was I just lucky?  Or what?  I doubt a specific answer will ever present itself, and I'm sure there will be opinions galore.

As for me and the layout and the discovered omission . . . I say I'll let this sleeping dog rest where he is and do nothing to upset him.

My conclusion to all of this discussion is this . . . DCC is the simplest wiring required for any model railroad.  As long as you don't over think it.  Like they say, "KISS!"

George

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Brian Eiland
 




On Fri, Jan 24, 2014 at 9:29 PM, railandsail <railandsail@...> wrote:
Thanks for that submission George. Since you obviously did a lot of research before you built your layout, are there any other reasons you might have for your lace of problems with just the single pair of track feeder wires??.....perhaps the size of your main power (bus) wiring?...or other?
Brian

**********************************************************************

that was suppose to be 'lack of problems' 

Re: DCC Track Design for review

george hohon3
 

Nope.  They would all be guesses.  The layout works as "mistakenly" built.  No shorts, no hot wires, no problems of any kind with the DCC power system.

George


On Jan 24, 2014, at 6:29 PM, "railandsail" <railandsail@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for that submission George. Since you obviously did a lot of research before you built your layout, are there any other reasons you might have for your lace of problems with just the single pair of track feeder wires??.....perhaps the size of your main power (bus) wiring?...or other?
Brian

**********************************************************************


On Fri, Jan 24, 2014 at 6:21 PM, george hohon3 <hohon3@...> wrote:
 

Just a comment . . . And much to my surprise, a true story.

A couple years back, I started a new layout and made the decision it would DCC throughout.  It's relatively small, a HO double deck plan in 12' x 14' extra bedroom.  I studied all the files, went to DCC clinics at a number of conventions, and built the layout using the recommended wiring practices.

Upon completing the track work, which includes a twelve track fiddle yard, multiple DCC friendly  turnouts, cross-overs, and sidings, I was tickled pink that first train navigated every inch of track without so much as a hiccup.

Jump ahead a couple of years and I'm facing an expansion of the layout into an adjacent room.  A review of the wiring was needed and during that exercise I discovered I did not complete all the recommended wiring practices, as stated by "the experts" from a couple of years back.

My discovery?  Well, much to my surprise (even though the entire layout had a main power bus under every foot of length) . . . There was only ONE pair of track feeder wires powering the entire layout!  One and only one.  Two years of running multiple trains and never a power problem.

We're the experts wrong?  Or was I just lucky?  Or what?  I doubt a specific answer will ever present itself, and I'm sure there will be opinions galore.

As for me and the layout and the discovered omission . . . I say I'll let this sleeping dog rest where he is and do nothing to upset him.

My conclusion to all of this discussion is this . . . DCC is the simplest wiring required for any model railroad.  As long as you don't over think it.  Like they say, "KISS!"

George

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Glenn
 

Both. Lucky and Experts Wrong

 

The buss has two purposes. One is to provide ample power to remote sections, two to ensure the signal reaches all areas.

 

Rail joints are the bane of both DCC and DC. Your joints must be tight otherwise you would lose power and signal. Evidently your track joints must be tight or soldered.

 

Under DC operation it was one loco per block. The typical single DC pack was ample.

 

With DCC there are many locos per block requiring more amperage than typical rail joints can carry. That’s where the buss and jumpers come into play. The buss is usually a heavy gauge and resupplies or supplies power to the tracks beyond the capability of the rail joiners.

 

You probably did not operate more than one to three locos at a time so the basic DCC system provided enough power and it satisfactorily reached all points. Even if there was a voltage drop it would not affect your operation. Typically we do not operate with 12 volts supplied to the motor. So long as track voltage remained higher than the operating voltage you did not notice the difference.

 

If you are satisfied with the operation of the old section leave it as is. Or maybe hooking up the jumper at the furthest track. But definitely run the new section from the buss or from a booster.

 

Glenn

 


On Behalf Of george hohon3

Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] DCC Track Design for review

 




Just a comment . . . And much to my surprise, a true story.

 

A couple years back, I started a new layout and made the decision it would DCC throughout.  It's relatively small, a HO double deck plan in 12' x 14' extra bedroom.  I studied all the files, went to DCC clinics at a number of conventions, and built the layout using the recommended wiring practices.

 

Upon completing the track work, which includes a twelve track fiddle yard, multiple DCC friendly  turnouts, cross-overs, and sidings, I was tickled pink that first train navigated every inch of track without so much as a hiccup.

 

Jump ahead a couple of years and I'm facing an expansion of the layout into an adjacent room.  A review of the wiring was needed and during that exercise I discovered I did not complete all the recommended wiring practices, as stated by "the experts" from a couple of years back.

 

My discovery?  Well, much to my surprise (even though the entire layout had a main power bus under every foot of length) . . . There was only ONE pair of track feeder wires powering the entire layout!  One and only one.  Two years of running multiple trains and never a power problem.

 

We're the experts wrong?  Or was I just lucky?  Or what?  I doubt a specific answer will ever present itself, and I'm sure there will be opinions galore.

 

As for me and the layout and the discovered omission . . . I say I'll let this sleeping dog rest where he is and do nothing to upset him.

 

My conclusion to all of this discussion is this . . . DCC is the simplest wiring required for any model railroad.  As long as you don't over think it.  Like they say, "KISS!"

 

George

 

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Annette and Dante Fuligni
 

George,

I am not surprised by your experience. My approximately 8’ x 12’ doughnut with a relatively dense amount of track and many turnouts works very well without the usually recommended “feeder to every rail” or “solder every joiner” practices. When I first tested it with DC, I used only one set of temporary feeders. When I did DCC (Digitrax Zephyr Extra 3 amp), I placed feeders where needed because of frog isolation gaps (I have a few older power-routing turnouts). Rail ends were treated with No-Ox before joining and the W/S joiners on W/S Code 83 track are very snug compared to those by Atlas. The voltage level is even throughout. All locations respond to the “quarter test”. Admittedly, the room is climate-controlled. If I ever have to, I can add feeders and/or solder joiners (in-place). Why do all that extra work in the beginning (unless later access will be difficult)?

Dante

Re: DCC Track Design for review

john
 

Guys,
   Unless you are in a hermitically sealed perfect environment with perfect temperature "watch soldering your rails and joiners" especially on curves. Curves can open or close rail gage with temperature change. Long lengths if straight (straightish) rail can separate from or damage switches and/or buckle track. Better more feeders than rail damage. My suggestion is to find "your" perfect soldering iron, use rosin core solder or a high quality fluid and solid solder, and use three colors of feeder wire. One color for north rail, one for south, and a different color for frogs/switch points for consistency. The perfect soldering iron is the one that you can make clean consistent joints on rail with. Big or small, high or low watts doesn't matter, use what works for you. Practice on your scraps. With practice it becomes easy and you won't mind, besides I find feeders easier to solder than joiners.
   Never use acid core flux or paste on tour layout. It will eventually cause your joint to fail. it will dissolve traces on pc boards, and it will travel by capillary action up along wires inside insulation and do hidden damage.
  
Ugh oh, sounds like preaching, hope it helps.
john

From: Annette and Dante Fuligni
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2014 9:24 AM
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: DCC Track Design for review

George,

I am not surprised by your experience. My approximately 8’ x 12’ doughnut with a relatively dense amount of track and many turnouts works very well without the usually recommended “feeder to every rail” or “solder every joiner” practices. When I first tested it with DC, I used only one set of temporary feeders. When I did DCC (Digitrax Zephyr Extra 3 amp), I placed feeders where needed because of frog isolation gaps (I have a few older power-routing turnouts). Rail ends were treated with No-Ox before joining and the W/S joiners on W/S Code 83 track are very snug compared to those by Atlas. The voltage level is even throughout. All locations respond to the “quarter test”. Admittedly, the room is climate-controlled. If I ever have to, I can add feeders and/or solder joiners (in-place). Why do all that extra work in the beginning (unless later access will be difficult)?

Dante

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Re: DCC Track Design for review

Bob Hand <rehandjr@...>
 

Click "Messages in this topic" at the bottom of this email message.  Logon.  You will be in Conversations (it will be bolded).  Click Files and you will be there.
 
bob


From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of Ed S
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2014 11:18 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] DCC Track Design for review

 

I have the NEO version of yahoo and I cannot find it in the files section.

I hate Neo.

Ed S

At 10:52 PM 1/22/2014, you wrote:
>
>
>Railandsail, go to the WiringForDCC Yahoo group; on the left side,
>click on FILES.
>
>The first half of that section is folders and the second half is
>individual files.
>
>Scroll down until you come to "Layout for Review".
>
>
>
>Paul O
>
>

Re: DCC Track Design for review

Scott H. Haycock
 

Ed,

Click on the "visit your group" at the bottom of this post where it says recent activity. When the Yahoo groups page comes up, click on  "Wiring For DCC" in the column on the left, showing the groups you belong to. Next click on "Files". Now go to the right side and change from "Alphabetical" to "Latest first". now scroll down. The 21st item, with the red PDF icon is what you want. Clicking on that will download the plan to your computer. I know, it's a pain, but after a while, you'll get the hang of it. 



Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm
ent


 

I have the NEO version of yahoo and I cannot find it in the files section.

I hate Neo.

Ed S

At 10:52 PM 1/22/2014, you wrote:
>
>
>Railandsail, go to the WiringForDCC Yahoo group; on the left side,
>click on FILES.
>
>The first half of that section is folders and the second half is
>individual files.
>
>Scroll down until you come to "Layout for Review".
>
>
>
>Paul O
>
>


Re: DCC Wiring - Can it cause a fire?

asychis@...
 

Great information Steve.  I take it this problem is automatically taken care of if the track power is "frog-routed," I. e. the track leading from a turnout thrown against you is dead?  That seems to be our situation.,  If a train is pulled up too close to a turnout thrown against it, it just dies.  Anyway, it is a good thing to check out.
 
Jerry Michels