Date   
Re: Blocking DCC

emrldsky
 

Hi John,

I would suggest that rather than trying to filter out the “AC”, that you install some full wave bridge rectifiers directly before the motors. Then regardless of whether the voltage that gets to them is DC or DCC, the motors will only see DC. This works id the motors only see one polarity of DC for their functioning. It is also true that the DCC voltage level is fixed, or maybe, constant is a better word. So if the motors depend on a variable DC voltage, then this approach would not work either.

 

Peace,

Mike G.

 

 

I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated.
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track.
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD

Re: Blocking DCC

Richard Gagnon
 

DCC is AC contrary to popular opinion. Equal positive and negative wave form. It is just not the AC we are accustomed to.
That is why the full wave bridge can convert this “AC” to pulsating DC to be filtered by the main filter capacitor.
This discussion pops up in various train forums every so often.

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:07 PM, Mike wrote:


Hi John,
I would suggest that rather than trying to filter out the “AC”, that you install some full wave bridge rectifiers directly before the motors. Then regardless of whether the voltage that gets to them is DC or DCC, the motors will only see DC. This works id the motors only see one polarity of DC for their functioning. It is also true that the DCC voltage level is fixed, or maybe, constant is a better word. So if the motors depend on a variable DC voltage, then this approach would not work either.
 
Peace,
Mike G.
 
 
I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated.
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track.
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD




Re: Blocking DCC

Richard Gagnon
 

All decoders end positive or negative pulses. PWM, to the motor whether the dual mode decoder is powered by DC or DCC.

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On , rg wrote:
DCC is AC contrary to popular opinion. Equal positive and negative wave form. It is just not the AC we are accustomed to.
That is why the full wave bridge can convert this “AC” to pulsating DC to be filtered by the main filter capacitor.
This discussion pops up in various train forums every so often.

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:07 PM, Mike wrote:


Hi John,
I would suggest that rather than trying to filter out the “AC”, that you install some full wave bridge rectifiers directly before the motors. Then regardless of whether the voltage that gets to them is DC or DCC, the motors will only see DC. This works id the motors only see one polarity of DC for their functioning. It is also true that the DCC voltage level is fixed, or maybe, constant is a better word. So if the motors depend on a variable DC voltage, then this approach would not work either.
 
Peace,
Mike G.
 
 
I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated.
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track.
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD






Re: Blocking DCC

Flash Gordon
 

I am far from being an expert.... I tried running one of my DC locos on a DCC track because the instructions for the command station said I could run one DC loco. It did work but even when stopped the loco still saw current and sat there and hummed and got hot. Now I am slowly buying up decoders I see on sale.

I have converted my layout to DCC and run only DCC equipment. Yes a lot of the older DC stuff is in the shop but eventually it will get converted. One exception, I do have a street car line running though the layout that will stay on DC. It does not connect at all to the railroad line; and it is autonomous and runs continually.

From what I have read here and on other groups it is a very bad idea to mix DC and DCC. You will end up burning up some of your equipment, then decide which system you want to embrace.

Ed S

Re: Blocking DCC

William E. Davies <wedavies@...>
 


Using a diode bridge will block any AC component with a little voltage loss.  You might try that.  As I understand the DCC concept it is an digital overlay on the DC however the frequency varies.  NCE or Tony's Train Exchange could probably help.


On 17-Dec-13 14:22, Carl wrote:
 

Hello JD:

Perhaps a relay to the motor that only closes when DC is available?

Carl.

On 12/17/2013 1:40 AM, Douglas Krahn wrote:
 
John:

First of all, Contrary to what many believe,  DCC  IS NOT AC.  I'm assuming from your statement about constructing a choke  you plan on somehow to build an RF filter to block the signal. I do not have a solution for you at this time; however, this is a great group and if it is possible, they will most likely be able to resolve  your problem.

Doug K
From: john
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Monday, December 16, 2013 9:33 PM
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Blocking DCC
 
I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated.
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track.
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD



Re: Blocking DCC

Richard Gagnon
 

Our club some years ago that has 14 blocks and four throttle capability thought could operate some blocks in DC and one or two in DCC with the NCE 5 amp Power Pro. As geezers will do, we got to gabbing and let a loco cross a gap between DC and DCC. Smoked the Power Cab Booster. The one that smoked the booster, we did not notice until too late.

Never had issues with the DC locos crossing into a DCC block. A DC loco on DCC will take some time to overheat, only if it is standing still. I did temperature measurements some years ago with an infra red temp scanner which would pin point the heat area right where the two brushes contact the commutator segments.

A DC only loco might cross the gap and we heard a buzz right away.

We stopped all DC loco operations after that.

Rich

Re: Blocking DCC

Richard Gagnon
 

Bachmann puts LC filters in their DCC locos because of requirements on the other side of the pond , EU and UK, to filter out a certain frequency. No idea if any other manufactures do this.

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:45 PM, William E. Davies wrote:



Using a diode bridge will block any AC component with a little voltage loss.  You might try that.  As I understand the DCC concept it is an digital overlay on the DC however the frequency varies.  NCE or Tony's Train Exchange could probably help.


On 17-Dec-13 14:22, Carl wrote:
 
Hello JD:

Perhaps a relay to the motor that only closes when DC is available?

Carl.

On 12/17/2013 1:40 AM, Douglas Krahn wrote:
 
John:

First of all, Contrary to what many believe,  DCC  IS NOT AC.  I'm assuming from your statement about constructing a choke  you plan on somehow to build an RF filter to block the signal. I do not have a solution for you at this time; however, this is a great group and if it is possible, they will most likely be able to resolve  your problem.

Doug K
From: john
To:
WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Monday, December 16, 2013 9:33 PM
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Blocking DCC
 
I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated.
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track.
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD







Re: Blocking DCC

Richard Gagnon
 

For the rivet counters, DCC is a form of AC, Have fun with the below link.

http://tinyurl.com/m5qcrcc

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:55 PM, rg wrote:


DCC is AC contrary to popular opinion. Equal positive and negative wave form. It is just not the AC we are accustomed to.
That is why the full wave bridge can convert this “AC” to pulsating DC to be filtered by the main filter capacitor.
This discussion pops up in various train forums every so often.

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:07 PM, Mike wrote:


Hi John,
I would suggest that rather than trying to filter out the “AC”, that you install some full wave bridge rectifiers directly before the motors. Then regardless of whether the voltage that gets to them is DC or DCC, the motors will only see DC. This works id the motors only see one polarity of DC for their functioning. It is also true that the DCC voltage level is fixed, or maybe, constant is a better word. So if the motors depend on a variable DC voltage, then this approach would not work either.
 
Peace,
Mike G.
 
 
I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated.
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track.
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD








Re: Blocking DCC

Mark Gurries
 

On Dec 16, 2013, at 7:33 PM, john wrote:

We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current.
Per the DCC standards, the two frequencies are about 5KHz and 8.6KHz which are in the Audio band. The frequency shifts up or down with respect to the binary data, 0 or 1, that is being sent. Hence on a DC locomotive you here an audible wine from the motor which is acting as a primitive speaker and current is flowing through the motor without it moving. The 5KHz is the challenging frequency so an inductor filter will be very large to meet the high inductance value required and at the same time be low enough in DC resistance value to not drop to much DC voltage when not running on DCC.

Doing some work, here is a potential part you can use for a HO locomotive:
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/5258-RC/M8275-ND/774815

1mH at 1A with 0.6 Ohm DC resistance. At 5KHz this represents an impedance of 32 ohms.

This part is 1.25" long and about 0.5" in diameter. So it is almost as large as the motor itself.

Here is a datasheet of the family of parts that it belongs to:
http://www.bourns.com/data/global/pdfs/5200_series.pdf

The on down side with using a large value inductor is the big increased inductive voltage spikes and sparks you will get as both the motor brushes and wheel pickup where are naturally intermittent. Contact point may become pitted due to arcing. Hence the circuit will get more complicated in the form of spike suppression.

To my knowledge no one has gone down this path successfully for one reason or another.

The bigger problem is on the layout itself. Making sure that DC and DCC never mix on the layout at the same time. You can damage your DCC equipment or DC throttles. The only rule that works is one where the layout is 100% DC or 100% DCC at any given time. This means one has to implement circuits (relays and interlocking circuits) that allow you to quickly switch control between the two independent systems. When you operate the layout, one has to decide the type of operation (DC or DCC) you going to have in a given operating session and throw the master switch to DC or DCC. The wiring can get very complicated as you must add a control layer on top of the existing wiring.

On Dec 16, 2013, at 10:40 PM, Douglas Krahn wrote:
John:

First of all, Contrary to what many believe, DCC IS NOT AC.
If one limits their defintion of AC to the classic and popular 60/50HZ sinewave which most common people think of when they hear the term AC, then that is true from your point of view but that does not make it technically correct.

DCC is clearly "a form of AC" and one only has to get an oscilloscope and look at it and see.

AC from a pure electrical engineering point of view simply means "Alternating Current" which has an associated "frequency term" with it. The shape of the AC waveform has no bearing on the definition of AC. The waveshapes (Squarewave, Sinewave, Rectangular, Triangle, Bi-polar) and terminology (RF, VHF, UHF, AM, FM, CB, Ultrasonic, Audio) are nothing more than subclassifications of AC that help us get a handle as in context on what we are specifically talking about. The opposite of AC is DC which has no frequency term. Simply put, you have DC or you have AC signals. You can even have AC superimposed on top of DC but the two types of signals have clearly different definitions. You can electrically combine and separate them from each other with circuits.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com

Re: Blocking DCC

Richard Gagnon
 

This ought to please some. Bi-Polar. I prefer a form of AC. Some do not understand bipolar.

http://jdb.psu.edu/nmra/faq_19.html

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 5:34 PM, rg wrote:


For the rivet counters, DCC is a form of AC, Have fun with the below link.

http://tinyurl.com/m5qcrcc

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:55 PM, rg wrote:


DCC is AC contrary to popular opinion. Equal positive and negative wave form. It is just not the AC we are accustomed to.
That is why the full wave bridge can convert this “AC” to pulsating DC to be filtered by the main filter capacitor.
This discussion pops up in various train forums every so often.

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:07 PM, Mike wrote:


Hi John,
I would suggest that rather than trying to filter out the “AC”, that you install some full wave bridge rectifiers directly before the motors. Then regardless of whether the voltage that gets to them is DC or DCC, the motors will only see DC. This works id the motors only see one polarity of DC for their functioning. It is also true that the DCC voltage level is fixed, or maybe, constant is a better word. So if the motors depend on a variable DC voltage, then this approach would not work either.
 
Peace,
Mike G.
 
 
I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated.
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track.
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD












Re: Blocking DCC

Mark Gurries
 

See my email to john, look at the bottom regarding DCC and AC.


On Dec 17, 2013, at 4:19 PM, rg wrote:



This ought to please some. Bi-Polar. I prefer a form of AC. Some do not understand bipolar.

http://jdb.psu.edu/nmra/faq_19.html

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 5:34 PM, rg <richg_1998@...> wrote:


For the rivet counters, DCC is a form of AC, Have fun with the below link.

http://tinyurl.com/m5qcrcc

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:55 PM, rg <richg_1998@...> wrote:


DCC is AC contrary to popular opinion. Equal positive and negative wave form. It is just not the AC we are accustomed to.
That is why the full wave bridge can convert this “AC” to pulsating DC to be filtered by the main filter capacitor.
This discussion pops up in various train forums every so often.

Rich

 
Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.


On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:07 PM, Mike <azMikeG@...> wrote:


Hi John,
I would suggest that rather than trying to filter out the “AC”, that you install some full wave bridge rectifiers directly before the motors. Then regardless of whether the voltage that gets to them is DC or DCC, the motors will only see DC. This works id the motors only see one polarity of DC for their functioning. It is also true that the DCC voltage level is fixed, or maybe, constant is a better word. So if the motors depend on a variable DC voltage, then this approach would not work either.
 
Peace,
Mike G.
 
 
I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated. 
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track. 
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD















Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: Blocking DCC

Max Maginness
 

These are for radio interference suppression for DC locos. The L and C values are sized for that, and are tiny compared to  the 1mH or so Mark Gurries mentioned.

 

Max

 

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of rg
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2013 1:53 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Blocking DCC

 

 

Bachmann puts LC filters in their DCC locos because of requirements on the other side of the pond , EU and UK, to filter out a certain frequency. No idea if any other manufactures do this.

 

Rich

 

 

Failure is not an option. it comes bundled with Windows.

 

On Tuesday, December 17, 2013 4:45 PM, William E. Davies <wedavies@...> wrote:

 


Using a diode bridge will block any AC component with a little voltage loss.  You might try that.  As I understand the DCC concept it is an digital overlay on the DC however the frequency varies.  NCE or Tony's Train Exchange could probably help.


On 17-Dec-13 14:22, Carl wrote:

 

Hello JD:

Perhaps a relay to the motor that only closes when DC is available?

Carl.

On 12/17/2013 1:40 AM, Douglas Krahn wrote:

 

John:

 

First of all, Contrary to what many believe,  DCC  IS NOT AC.  I'm assuming from your statement about constructing a choke  you plan on somehow to build an RF filter to block the signal. I do not have a solution for you at this time; however, this is a great group and if it is possible, they will most likely be able to resolve  your problem.

 

Doug K

From: john
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Monday, December 16, 2013 9:33 PM
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Blocking DCC

 

I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated.
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track.
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD

 



 


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Re: Blocking DCC

Glenn
 

Do it the old fashioned way. Leave the layout blocked as for analog DC operation.

 

Substitute the DCC command station for one of the DC Cabs.

 

When an analog engine is in the block, select the appropriate DC Cab.

 

When any DCC loco is operating in the block select the DCC cab.

 

That way the layout can be run with mixed DC and DCC locos. It can also be run as DC minus one cab. That cab could be wired with a switch for DC or DCC control.

 

If running pure DCC set all blocks to the cab that now has DCC control.

 

As far as putting bridge rectifiers in the DC locos you will be running at full throttle and have no direction control.

 

Glenn

 

 

I belong to the Cross Roads Rail Road Club in the Dayton area. We have been a DC club for 30 years so you can imagine the DC equipment we have accumulated.
We are presently adding, not converting, DCC. In an effort to avoid burning up our vintage stuff and some nice stuff that doesn't lend itself to conversion I would like to block the AC current and signal from getting to DC motors using a choke. My problem is I don't know the frequencies involved in the Digitrax signal and current. I am reasonably sure that the track current is very close to what I put in, 16 volts AC and about 14 volts AC at the track.
Does anyone know the frequencies involved, Digitrax couldn't tell me and I couldn't find the data anywhere.
Thank you
JD

 

 


RRampMeter - - Adding a Second Booster

redking56@...
 

I have an NCE PH-Pro 5 amp system and I have wired a RRampMeter in line with the booster to continuously read voltage and amps on my layout.


If I add a second booster, am I correct that I will need a second RRampMeter?

Rich

Re: RRampMeter - - Adding a Second Booster

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

There is no real need to add a wired in RRampMeter, unless you really want one to indicate the current output separately for each booster. But be aware that there is a voltage drop between booster and track associated with the RRampMeter when it is measuring current. To minimize issues when trains cross over booster district boundaries you should verify and adjust the booster voltages to match the actual voltage reaching the track from each unit.

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of redking56@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2013 8:59 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] RRampMeter - - Adding a Second Booster

 



I have an NCE PH-Pro 5 amp system and I have wired a RRampMeter in line with the booster to continuously read voltage and amps on my layout.

 

If I add a second booster, am I correct that I will need a second RRampMeter?

 

Rich




Re: RRampMeter - - Adding a Second Booster

redking56@...
 

Thanks, Don, you gave me something to think about with that comment about crossing booster district boundaries.


Rich



---In WiringForDCC@{{emailDomain}}, <dvollrath@...> wrote:

There is no real need to add a wired in RRampMeter, unless you really want one to indicate the current output separately for each booster. But be aware that there is a voltage drop between booster and track associated with the RRampMeter when it is measuring current. To minimize issues when trains cross over booster district boundaries you should verify and adjust the booster voltages to match the actual voltage reaching the track from each unit.

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of redking56@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 18, 2013 8:59 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] RRampMeter - - Adding a Second Booster

 



I have an NCE PH-Pro 5 amp system and I have wired a RRampMeter in line with the booster to continuously read voltage and amps on my layout.

 

If I add a second booster, am I correct that I will need a second RRampMeter?

 

Rich




reverse polarity issue

shelbys_dad@...
 

I have a newbie reverse polarity question.  I have a mainline track that at one point is running side by side and I would like to connect the two tracks with 2 turnouts, but that will create a polarity issue.  Is there a way I can connect these and fix the polarity issue?  I used to use a device attached to a reverse loop to do this on an older layout.  Will that work in this instance or is there some other way to fix this?  Thanks in advance!

Re: reverse polarity issue

Flash Gordon
 

Isolate the turn outs and use your reverse loop device to control
polarity in that area. See attached picture.

Ed S

At 08:09 AM 12/23/2013, you wrote:


I have a newbie reverse polarity question. I have a mainline track
that at one point is running side by side and I would like to
connect the two tracks with 2 turnouts, but that will create a
polarity issue. Is there a way I can connect these and fix the
polarity issue? I used to use a device attached to a reverse loop
to do this on an older layout. Will that work in this instance or
is there some other way to fix this? Thanks in advance!

Re: reverse polarity issue

Flash Gordon
 

I put the picture in a photo album  called Ed S stuff...    the red track is the area to isolate and connect to reverser.

Ed S


At 11:50 AM 12/23/2013, you wrote:
 

Isolate the turn outs and use your reverse loop device to control
polarity in that area. See attached picture.

Ed S

At 08:09 AM 12/23/2013, you wrote:
>
>
>I have a newbie reverse polarity question. I have a mainline track
>that at one point is running side by side and I would like to
>connect the two tracks with 2 turnouts, but that will create a
>polarity issue. Is there a way I can connect these and fix the
>polarity issue? I used to use a device attached to a reverse loop
>to do this on an older layout. Will that work in this instance or
>is there some other way to fix this? Thanks in advance!



Re: reverse polarity issue

Mark Gurries
 


On Dec 23, 2013, at 5:09 AM, <shelbys_dad@...> <shelbys_dad@...> wrote:_,___

I have a newbie reverse polarity question.  I have a mainline track that at one point is running side by side and I would like to connect the two tracks with 2 turnouts, but that will create a polarity issue. 

Sound like at least half of a "Dog Bone".  Look here for information on were to install the double insulated rail joiners.


Click on "Reversing Sections" on the index table on the right.  Scroll down a bit more than 1/2 way and you will see the section labeled "Using Double Crossovers with a Balloon Track."   Just pretend your single crossover is the same as the double crossover.   You can see the two possible solutions but the first is the best where the ballon track is the reversing track.

Is there a way I can connect these and fix the polarity issue?  I used to use a device attached to a reverse loop to do this on an older layout.  Will that work in this instance or is there some other way to fix this?  Thanks in advance! 

Yes.  Any switch based solution to a reverse polarity situation used with DC will also work with DCC.   

However, the nice thing about DCC is that you also have the option of buying a "DCC Auto Reverser" which will change the polarity of the track for you on the fly.  It is a hands off solution so you can focus on running trains and not control panels.   The one negative aspect of DCC Auto Reverser is that they do not work for DC.   So if you plan to use both DC and DCC on your layout, stick with the switch solution since that is universal.

There are several manufactures of DCC Autoreverser.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com