Date   
Re: Buss wire

Jerry Michels
 

It seems to me that unless you have a large supply of 20-gauge wire, it is cheaper time-wise to simply buy the correct size to begin with.  You can go to Best Buy or Lowes or other big box stores and buy a 100' 14-gauge extension cord very cheaply and either strip off the cover or just use as is.  You get the bonus of having a good ground wire.

Jerry Michels
Amarillo Railroad Museum

Re: Buss wire

Mark Cartwright
 

Morgan....
I am in a project to run an N Scale Train around the perimeter of much of my 2900 square foot house on a perch (above the cats) then drop it down via an oblong Helix (closet) to my sit down table height of 30 inches in the back Family Room (main layout).
> I like to hear trains off in the distance....even Model Railroad Trains around my house.
========
>>> I bought three gigantic rolls of old time Door Bell Wire from a local Habitat for Humanity Restore for $5.
So...If such wire was good enough for 12 volt transformers back in the day?
No....I am not going there.
===> DCC with Sound is a whole other level of Model Railroading.
============
I won't tell you what to do with YOUR LAYOUT...except do the best you can with what you got.
If this was 1959...I would be very happy with the Bell Door Wire for my then 5x9 HO Scale Table.
Cause I was 6 years old in 1959, when I began my first layout with nearly no money.
I did the best I could and had a lot of fun in creating it with only one Lionel  4-6-2 locomotive, a few train set cars and a Varney Two Dollar Kits.
I made my own trees, the Silo was an Oatmeal Box...and dirt?
I used dirt
....  and found my own tree moss.
> To this day; I can tell you which way North is.
So....Find your own direction.
=============
BTW....
At the age of 6...
I had actually witnessed Steam Locomotives in action !!!! and knew then their very distinctive sounds.
============
For me however...and I am not 100% sure my AWG is sufficient enough for the long trek of track I am submitting it to.....
I am using 12 AWG, stranded copper wire...Color Coded to Kato Standards of Blue with a White Stripe and White with a Blue Stripe as my main buss wire.
Then using Kato Drop down plug in leads from the track itself, to every 18 inch soldered section.
In locomotives themselves...I am using combinations of 24 to 36 AWG Decoder Wiring.
Yes, in model railroading >>> I am mixing gauges.
====
Cause 12 Gauge AWG simply will not fit inside an N Scale Locomotive.
The Z Scale Guys worry about 30 vs 36 AWG.
====
In house/home wiring however ...I do not mix gauges to the outlets.
So all outlets are 12 gauge, some overhead lighting is 14 gauge and all panels are 6/3.
What's my house wiring having to do with my Model Railroad?
Perhaps nothing ...but many of the outlets around my home were out of Phase with other worser problems too.
For me however...
I am looking from the PG&E Pole outside, through my house to my ESU ECoS and then all the way to the Speaker wire in my locomotives.
If my ECoS (DCC Controller) was expecting 240 volts European...Can it adjust well with 120 volts American ?
I don't know !
I often do the math and then measure anyway. (and I am not happy about that tree so close to the PG&E Transformer either)
> a 10% Drop is unacceptable, at least i like to think it is....but I won't really know till i finish running the track around my house.
======
If your layout is say under 4x8 feet...Do what every you want...with what ever you got.
And don't fret all the mistakes you are about to make.
Cause...
You will have the opportunity to make different ones for your next layout.
:)) Mark

If a model train leaves your layout's passenger station in your family room...
Can you hear it when it arrives in your bedroom on the far side of the house?
At 65 years old...I don't know.
When I was 6.....I could tell the differences in sounds of locomotives all over this town.

Re: Buss wire

Tom G.
 

The extension cord is a great idea! Another option would be to use bus bars. I bought them for around $2 a piece from a warehouse. I can provide a link if you want to go that route. 

Thanks.
Tom

On Mar 27, 2019, at 9:30 AM, Jerry Michels <gjmichels53@...> wrote:

It seems to me that unless you have a large supply of 20-gauge wire, it is cheaper time-wise to simply buy the correct size to begin with.  You can go to Best Buy or Lowes or other big box stores and buy a 100' 14-gauge extension cord very cheaply and either strip off the cover or just use as is.  You get the bonus of having a good ground wire.

Jerry Michels
Amarillo Railroad Museum

Re: Buss wire

Jay
 

Hi,
For my N Scale layout I used 14G Kitchen & Bath Romex.
It is very flexible & worked great for the buss on my layout.
I have 5 36x80 "Modules" plus a 60x24 bridge between them.
That's almost 40' of bench work.
I did have to run a jumper across the middle.
There was a noticeable loss of power furthest from the command station.
But now it works fine.

Jay

Peco SL-E391F turnout

Michael Snyder
 

I am new to your group and to model railroading.  I am currently laying track, N scale, and need help with the multitude of Peco turnouts.  
 As typed int he subject, I am using all Peco N Scale Code 55 electrofrog turnouts.  My first set of questions is for the SL-E391F:

1. What are jumpers as manufactured by Peco?  Where are they located?  It states that they are to be removed.  How does one go about removing them without destroying the turn out?

2. In the photograph, where the frog wires are cut and soldered together on the back side of the turnout, I get this.  What I can not see is, the wires that are joined and soldered together, are they both then connected to the main bus or to the Tortise Switch?  Then comes the question of where does the Frog Juicer fit into all of this?

Thats's about it on this switch.  Thanks to anyone who can help.

Michael


Re: Buss wire

Tom G.
 

https://www.adafruit.com/product/737

Great site for electronics parts as well. 

Bus bars $1.95


-----Original Message-----
From: Jay <jayfmn@q.com>
To: w4dccqa <w4dccqa@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Mar 27, 2019 10:37 am
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Buss wire

Hi,
For my N Scale layout I used 14G Kitchen & Bath Romex.
It is very flexible & worked great for the buss on my layout.
I have 5 36x80 "Modules" plus a 60x24 bridge between them.
That's almost 40' of bench work.
I did have to run a jumper across the middle.
There was a noticeable loss of power furthest from the command station.
But now it works fine.

Jay

Re: Buss wire

PennsyNut
 

I didn't mean to start any arguments. I was only trying to understand. What I am in the beginning of doing is a shelf layout 24' long. That means a buss of ? 22'. I have a nice run of 25' of a cable that was blue insulation. Inside were/are 8 wires. Each from what I can tell by using a simple wire stripper is 20 AWG. All this is free, each wire is good stranded copper wire. I took 2 of the wires, twisted them together. Stripped them where needed for feeders, and connected the feeder to both wires. I know it looks like smaller than AWG`14, but in a chart, saw that 2 x 20 = 14. Now you say it's 4 x. Well, that I can do too. 22' of good copper wire that is a relatively new cable is what I have and it's free. I am only trying to be frugal and not have to purchase wire. I suppose if I wanted too, could just buy 14 AWG at H-D. But I am just trying to avoid spending money on wire. The cost of the PECO track is enough to hurt. I made my own roadbed instead of buying cork. I am trying to keep costs within my budget. I could have bought cheaper track, but felt that as long as the quality is there, to use it. I've seen wire installations that scare me. This is just a simple shelf with all these wires on top. The buss is along the front edge and will be hidden by fascia and scenery. I fail to understand what you mean by "problems in the future". Once all this wire is fastened in place, all connections soldered, what can happen? I once lived in a house that had wiring from the 1920's. As late as 1970, there was no problem. Other than not enough outlets. But the basic wiring was still conducting 120 volts with a lot of appliances. Yes, if A/C was added, there would be trouble. But that never happened. The only major trouble with that house was it had fuses. LOL Nowadays we use circuit breakers. And on a simple 24' shelf layout, a light bulb will suffice. Now tell me a circuit breaker is a necessity? Aren't there ways to do things inexpensively without sacrificing quality? Now don't take this as an argument. I'm simply trying to understand. I have 20 AWG in quantity. Hoping to keep it in a quality use. Copper is the best. So from what y'all are telling me is that I can use it. Just 4 instead of 2. That is doable and feasible and should provide the quality sufficient for my needs. OK??????
--
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC

Re: Buss wire

David Klemm
 

Morgan,

Sounds like you have Cat5/6 wiring. That is a great LocoNet cable and can also be used for the wire drops from the track to the buss. 

For the buss get 12 or 14 gauge wire. For that small amount it won’t cost much and will be better for you. 

David Klemm
Xs Max
 


From: w4dccqa@groups.io on behalf of PennsyNut <pennsynut@...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2019 10:51
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Buss wire
 
I didn't mean to start any arguments. I was only trying to understand. What I am in the beginning of doing is a shelf layout 24' long. That means a buss of ? 22'. I have a nice run of 25' of a cable that was blue insulation. Inside were/are 8 wires. Each from what I can tell by using a simple wire stripper is 20 AWG. All this is free, each wire is good stranded copper wire. I took 2 of the wires, twisted them together. Stripped them where needed for feeders, and connected the feeder to both wires. I know it looks like smaller than AWG`14, but in a chart, saw that 2 x 20 = 14. Now you say it's 4 x. Well, that I can do too. 22' of good copper wire that is a relatively new cable is what I have and it's free. I am only trying to be frugal and not have to purchase wire. I suppose if I wanted too, could just buy 14 AWG at H-D. But I am just trying to avoid spending money on wire. The cost of the PECO track is enough to hurt. I made my own roadbed instead of buying cork. I am trying to keep costs within my budget. I could have bought cheaper track, but felt that as long as the quality is there, to use it. I've seen wire installations that scare me. This is just a simple shelf with all these wires on top. The buss is along the front edge and will be hidden by fascia and scenery. I fail to understand what you mean by "problems in the future". Once all this wire is fastened in place, all connections soldered, what can happen? I once lived in a house that had wiring from the 1920's. As late as 1970, there was no problem. Other than not enough outlets. But the basic wiring was still conducting 120 volts with a lot of appliances. Yes, if A/C was added, there would be trouble. But that never happened. The only major trouble with that house was it had fuses. LOL Nowadays we use circuit breakers. And on a simple 24' shelf layout, a light bulb will suffice. Now tell me a circuit breaker is a necessity? Aren't there ways to do things inexpensively without sacrificing quality? Now don't take this as an argument. I'm simply trying to understand. I have 20 AWG in quantity. Hoping to keep it in a quality use. Copper is the best. So from what y'all are telling me is that I can use it. Just 4 instead of 2. That is doable and feasible and should provide the quality sufficient for my needs. OK??????
--
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC

Re: Buss wire

Carl
 

Hi Gang:

Heavy wire does help avoid excessive voltage drop. Voltage drop is a factor of current, not the starting voltage. So take a long run, at the end with NO load there should be almost no voltage drop. As you add loads the current will go up, and at an earlier point Light wire will start acting as a heater and will drop the voltage available at the end. Heavy wire no so much.

So at 12 volts we have fewer volts to give up that at 120v.

Since you have tons of 20 AWG wire, why not just make each track drop a home run to a common terminal strip? Every section of track can draw from its own drop, but the drops on each side. Plus fewer connections " in the field ".

If you go the extension cord route, check the trash this spring when home owners clip the ends off there cords trimming the bushes!

Carl.

On 3/27/2019 11:51 AM, PennsyNut wrote:
I didn't mean to start any arguments. I was only trying to understand. What I am in the beginning of doing is a shelf layout 24' long. That means a buss of ? 22'. I have a nice run of 25' of a cable that was blue insulation. Inside were/are 8 wires. Each from what I can tell by using a simple wire stripper is 20 AWG. All this is free, each wire is good stranded copper wire. I took 2 of the wires, twisted them together. Stripped them where needed for feeders, and connected the feeder to both wires. I know it looks like smaller than AWG`14, but in a chart, saw that 2 x 20 = 14. Now you say it's 4 x. Well, that I can do too. 22' of good copper wire that is a relatively new cable is what I have and it's free. I am only trying to be frugal and not have to purchase wire. I suppose if I wanted too, could just buy 14 AWG at H-D. But I am just trying to avoid spending money on wire. The cost of the PECO track is enough to hurt. I made my own roadbed instead of buying cork. I am trying to keep costs within my budget. I could have bought cheaper track, but felt that as long as the quality is there, to use it. I've seen wire installations that scare me. This is just a simple shelf with all these wires on top. The buss is along the front edge and will be hidden by fascia and scenery. I fail to understand what you mean by "problems in the future". Once all this wire is fastened in place, all connections soldered, what can happen? I once lived in a house that had wiring from the 1920's. As late as 1970, there was no problem. Other than not enough outlets. But the basic wiring was still conducting 120 volts with a lot of appliances. Yes, if A/C was added, there would be trouble. But that never happened. The only major trouble with that house was it had fuses. LOL Nowadays we use circuit breakers. And on a simple 24' shelf layout, a light bulb will suffice. Now tell me a circuit breaker is a necessity? Aren't there ways to do things inexpensively without sacrificing quality? Now don't take this as an argument. I'm simply trying to understand. I have 20 AWG in quantity. Hoping to keep it in a quality use. Copper is the best. So from what y'all are telling me is that I can use it. Just 4 instead of 2. That is doable and feasible and should provide the quality sufficient for my needs. OK??????
--
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC

Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

monty cunningham
 

Could you do an abbreviated explanation/diagram (for dummies) on how to wire this up?
Monty

Re: Buss wire

JB
 

Better yet, look in you're area for an electrical supply distributor and you should be able to purchase a 500' roll of #14 THHN stranded wire for about the same price as what the big box stores charge for a 100' roll. Just pay cash and you should get a better deal.

JB
Licensed CT. Master Electrician

Re: Buss wire

Gary Chudzinski
 

I have a perimeter layout that is almost 120'.  I split the layout evenly into two 5 Amp power districts, connected the boosters in the middle of each district.  I twisted red and black 12 ga stranded wires (from Home Depot) per recommended, ran 18 ga. feeders every six feet and have a voltage drop of only a few tens, under load, at the extremes.  I found, however, I had to PROGRAM my desired maximum trip current on the RRCircuits circuit breaker as the jumper selections were not compatible with my desired tripping current.  I have had no power problems whatsoever!  As a precautionary measure, since this was a new layout, I installed snubbers (4 total) at the ends of each power district.  Allan and Mark have written much excellent guidance about DCC power installations! 

Gary Chudzinski

Re: Buss wire

Al Silverstein
 

There are many solutions to the creation of a rail bus. If the command station or booster is centrally located in the area of coverage then 14 awg wire can easily reach 20’ with very little voltage loss and 12 awg can easily reach 40’ with very little voltage loss.
 
I am helping a friend convert his, HO scale, DC controlled layout to DCC. So far he has only used 14 awg zip wire and loves how easy it is to work with. His layout only required a command station and one add on booster. His command station feeds a quad circuit breaker device where each of the four legs feeds a rail bus about 20’ long. His booster feeds a quad circuit breaker device where he uses only three of the breakers where each of the three legs are less than 20’ long. He plans on having operating sessions with 4-5 of his friends operating trains.
 
Now what is my friend using for his rail bus? He is using 14 awg Red/Black Zip wire. Zip wire generally comes in the form of one red wire and one black wire. It can easily be separated into two wires, one red and one black. He is wiring his layout where the Red wire is the rail A feed and the Black wire is the rail B feed. This makes rail phasing easy. He will have two auto phasing sections of track to which he plans on using one of the simple reverse control devices.
 
On eBay earlier today, before my reply, I looked up the selling price of Zip wire in 100’ lengths. 14 awg Red/Black zip wire can be found for as little as $19.95 with free shipping from US vendors. 12 awg Red/Black zip wire can be found for as little as $38.95 with free shipping from US vendors.
 
My friend received both of his separate 14 awg orders in under a week from the date of purchase.
 
Al Silverstein
 

Re: Peco SL-E391F turnout

Michael Snyder
 

I put out these questions on Wed and haven't received any response.  I'm not sure what to expect, but I thought I would have heard something by now.  Does anybody know how to help please?

Michael

On Wed, Mar 27, 2019 at 8:46 AM Michael Snyder via Groups.Io <comichael57=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am new to your group and to model railroading.  I am currently laying track, N scale, and need help with the multitude of Peco turnouts.  
 As typed int he subject, I am using all Peco N Scale Code 55 electrofrog turnouts.  My first set of questions is for the SL-E391F:

1. What are jumpers as manufactured by Peco?  Where are they located?  It states that they are to be removed.  How does one go about removing them without destroying the turn out?

2. In the photograph, where the frog wires are cut and soldered together on the back side of the turnout, I get this.  What I can not see is, the wires that are joined and soldered together, are they both then connected to the main bus or to the Tortise Switch?  Then comes the question of where does the Frog Juicer fit into all of this?

Thats's about it on this switch.  Thanks to anyone who can help.

Michael


Re: Peco SL-E391F turnout

wirefordcc
 

Michael,

Hopefully we'll hear from N-scalers who use the Peco electrofrog.  One of my website readers sent me a N-scale Peco turnout several years ago. It is documented on my website at: http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches_peco.htm  I don't have it now.  So what I know is what is contained in my website. 

The diagram for the Peco electrofrogs indicates where the jumpers are located that you need to cut.  They are on the bottom of the turnout.  The rail is already gapped.  Just snip the jumpers and push apart the ends so they don't touch.

You will need to add jumpers on the bottom of the turnout as shown in the diagram in my website.  You will also need to add the feeders from the stock rails to your bus.

Don't forget the insulated joiners that I show in my diagram.

I hope this helps.  Otherwise, we'll have to rely on any Peco N-scale electrofrog users.

Allan Gartner
Wiring For DCC

Re: Peco SL-E391F turnout

Dale Gloer
 

I have not used the Peco N scale Electrofrog turnouts but I have  installed about 100 HO scale ones.  If the Nscale are similar then I  think I can help you.  First of all, go to the wiringfordcc.com web pages and from the main page select 'turnouts', then in the menu bar on the right hand side of the page presented, select Peco.  Scroll down to this item -
SUGGESTION #2-12b:  Peco "Electrofrog" Turnout Is DCC Friendly In Just a Few Snips.  Look at the the picture labelled ' Electrofrog - Underneath View Unmodified' and compare it to your turnout.  If they are the same then here is answers to your questions.  If not, you can stop reading. 
"1. What are jumpers?"  The jumpers are the 2 very short wires at the right side of the picture.  They connect across the insulators in the point rails where the frog connects.  It is not necessary to remove then, just snip the wire and make sure they not longer make electrical connection.  (Actually, they are held in place with very small spot welds and can easily be pulled off once they are cut.)  Reference the third picture showing the modified turnout.
"2. I'm not sure what your question is?"  The two short copper wires soldered between the stock rails and the point rails provide power to the point rails and ensure that a derailment will not cause a short circuit in the switch.  Since they are connected to the stock rail you do not need to wire them to anything else.  They also mean that power to the point rails is not dependent on good electrical contact between the toe of the points and the stock rails.  The two long jumpers under the frog should remain as is.  The wire that is connected to the frog and leads out the side of the switch through a tie is where you connect power to the frog.  If you are using a Tortoise to operate the turnout you can use one  of the sets of contacts in the Tortoise to route power to the frog.  If you want to use a Frog Juicer then you connect the frog juicer to your DCC bus and to the Frog wire following the Frog Juicer instructions.  (The Frog Juicer is an excellent device for this and is easier to use than wiring the Tortoise contacts.)

I hope this helps you. 

Dale Gloer   (I contributed this section to the website)

Re: Peco SL-E391F turnout

John Johnston <towboatjohnston@...>
 

Michael,

 

I am sorry not to have responded sooner.  Had some allergy problems that made me too sick to function, but am coming back to life now.  I use Peco Code 55 too.  The jumpers are different from HO, different (I think) from Code 80, and different between small (SL-E391F)  and medium radius turnouts.  They may also have changed over time. It is disconcerting, but they are worth the trouble.  Well manufactured and smooth running.

 

If you want truly understand, I recommend Alan Gartner’s web site.  The pictures don’t match the Code 55 electrofrogs on my layout, but the background was helpful within the rather tight limits of my mental capacity.  When my brain filled up, I resorted to my usual strategy of stomping into the minefield and waiting for something to blow up.  I haven’t tried everything yet, but I’m happy to report on what has and has not worked for me.  I use solenoids and Blue Points, so I don’t have any Tortoise experience, but there are plenty of smart people out there who can help you on those.

 

Must put some fires out on my day job first.  Then I will try to take a few pictures of things that are not glued down and send some comments, and we can go from there.

 

Cheers,

John Johnston

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Snyder
Sent: Friday, March 29, 2019 10:22 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Peco SL-E391F turnout

 

I put out these questions on Wed and haven't received any response.  I'm not sure what to expect, but I thought I would have heard something by now.  Does anybody know how to help please?

 

Michael

 

On Wed, Mar 27, 2019 at 8:46 AM Michael Snyder via Groups.Io <comichael57=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

I am new to your group and to model railroading.  I am currently laying track, N scale, and need help with the multitude of Peco turnouts.  

 As typed int he subject, I am using all Peco N Scale Code 55 electrofrog turnouts.  My first set of questions is for the SL-E391F:

 

1. What are jumpers as manufactured by Peco?  Where are they located?  It states that they are to be removed.  How does one go about removing them without destroying the turn out?

 

2. In the photograph, where the frog wires are cut and soldered together on the back side of the turnout, I get this.  What I can not see is, the wires that are joined and soldered together, are they both then connected to the main bus or to the Tortise Switch?  Then comes the question of where does the Frog Juicer fit into all of this?

 

Thats's about it on this switch.  Thanks to anyone who can help.

 

Michael

 

 

Re: Peco SL-E391F turnout

John Johnston <towboatjohnston@...>
 

Michael,

 

I found an SL-E391F still in the package and have uploaded a photo of the back to the group web site.  I also uploaded photos of an older-model Insulfrog turnout with exposed wires that are easy to see for comparison.  The Album name is Code 55 Electrofrog.  It is fair game for anyone who wants to use/add/annotate etc.  And just to add to the confusion, I threw in photos of a double-slip and some top views of scissors crossovers connected to either toe and frog ends of SL-E391F and SL-E392F turnouts.  In the process, I noticed that Alan Gartner is the moderator of this group.  He knows WAY more about this stuff than any of us, and can correct my mistakes if he has time.  My photos are better than his, though.

 

Anyway – to your questions:

 

  1. The jumper on the SL-E391F (and it’s small radius left counterpart) is the exposed Square-C shaped wire that bridges between inside two rails of the frog and the two closure rails.  You will see that the each end of the C connects across both rails, meaning that all parts of the frog are connected electrically.  They are also connected electrically through the hinges to the point rails, so that whichever point rail touches one of the stock rails, will deliver the power from that stock rail to the entire frog.  It is tricky to cut the very short legs connecting adjacent rails at each end of the C, and VERY hard to re-solder individual wires without melting the plastic ties.  I failed.  (See Frog Juicers).
  2. The jumpers on the medium radius turnouts (SL-E395F and 396F) are different.  Two separate wires run longitudinally to connect the each closure rail to its corresponding frog rail.  Mine are all glued down, but there is a picture of one on Alan’s web site.  It is easy to snip them in the middle, and end up with four nice leads already soldered to the appropriate rails.
  3. I included a photo of on older model Insulfrog with crossing longitudinal wires, and showing how the point rails connect to the closure rails through a joiner.  Now they use a wiper hinge, which is better but still not reliable enough.  (Also a little dirt or oxidation will prevent the point rail from making good electrical contact with the stock rail.) 
  4. MUST USE insulated joiners on the two inside rails at the frog end.  Otherwise whichever way the switch is set, the polarity will always be wrong for one of the two tracks.

 

I have 80 small radius turnouts, and cataracts.  Rather than melting ties, I have opted for “half-friendly.”  I power-route the frogs with Frog Juicers or Blue Points.  Results to date have been excellent.  I don’t seem to have many out-of-gauge problems.  Derailments still cause shorts, but I prefer that to collisions.  Electrofrog double-slips and crossovers are getting friendlier (cuts and leads already).  I haven’t tried any Unifrogs yet.

 

To use a Frog Juicer with the SL-E391F, I lift a corner of the jumper directly under the rail with an Exacto knife about 1/8th inch.  I pull a single wire from my big roll of Cat 5 and tin 1/4th inch, then bend a very small hook around the exposed jumper with the wire pointing straight down.  If I keep the solder blob small, it will go back into the groove in the plastic, or disappear into hole drilled into the roadbed directly under the rail. Connect that wire into one of the six holes in a Hex Juicer, and you are done.  Frog Juicers are expensive, but easy to use, and they work beautifully.  I use Hex Juicers because I need to juice a lot of frogs.  Haven’t tried singles or duplex.  Plenty of power for anything in N-scale.  No problems so far with some leads going to frogs on a reversing section or sharing two leads from one juicer across two adjacent frogs.  I not tried powering two frogs from the same lead, but it should work if the frogs never need different polarity at the same time.

 

Blue points are cheaper, but I don’t have enough in service yet to deliver a verdict.  Should also be easy and effective. Tortoises have built-in power routing switches, but I don’t know beans about them.  Micro switches are an option I haven’t explored.  They don’t seem to offer much benefit for the small difference in cost.  If I were doing sophisticated signaling, I might think differently.

 

Critical spots first (hidden, hard to reach, switching intensive).  Some routes have been so trouble free that I’m just letting them run as-is until they cause problems.  Eventually they will.  Oxidation happens.  Good cleaning may postpone the day.

 

Like any good railroad nut, I could babble on until your eyes glaze over.  Will stop for now and wait for the next round…

John

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Johnston via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, March 29, 2019 12:25 PM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Peco SL-E391F turnout

 

Michael,

 

I am sorry not to have responded sooner.  Had some allergy problems that made me too sick to function, but am coming back to life now.  I use Peco Code 55 too.  The jumpers are different from HO, different (I think) from Code 80, and different between small (SL-E391F)  and medium radius turnouts.  They may also have changed over time. It is disconcerting, but they are worth the trouble.  Well manufactured and smooth running.

 

If you want truly understand, I recommend Alan Gartner’s web site.  The pictures don’t match the Code 55 electrofrogs on my layout, but the background was helpful within the rather tight limits of my mental capacity.  When my brain filled up, I resorted to my usual strategy of stomping into the minefield and waiting for something to blow up.  I haven’t tried everything yet, but I’m happy to report on what has and has not worked for me.  I use solenoids and Blue Points, so I don’t have any Tortoise experience, but there are plenty of smart people out there who can help you on those.

 

Must put some fires out on my day job first.  Then I will try to take a few pictures of things that are not glued down and send some comments, and we can go from there.

 

Cheers,

John Johnston

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Snyder
Sent: Friday, March 29, 2019 10:22 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Peco SL-E391F turnout

 

I put out these questions on Wed and haven't received any response.  I'm not sure what to expect, but I thought I would have heard something by now.  Does anybody know how to help please?

 

Michael

 

On Wed, Mar 27, 2019 at 8:46 AM Michael Snyder via Groups.Io <comichael57=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

I am new to your group and to model railroading.  I am currently laying track, N scale, and need help with the multitude of Peco turnouts.  

 As typed int he subject, I am using all Peco N Scale Code 55 electrofrog turnouts.  My first set of questions is for the SL-E391F:

 

1. What are jumpers as manufactured by Peco?  Where are they located?  It states that they are to be removed.  How does one go about removing them without destroying the turn out?

 

2. In the photograph, where the frog wires are cut and soldered together on the back side of the turnout, I get this.  What I can not see is, the wires that are joined and soldered together, are they both then connected to the main bus or to the Tortise Switch?  Then comes the question of where does the Frog Juicer fit into all of this?

 

Thats's about it on this switch.  Thanks to anyone who can help.

 

Michael

 

 

bacmann ez track and dcc

staceyatvt@...
 

i was wondering is it possable to run dcc on my ez track (silver/nickle) and what i need to buy 

Re: bacmann ez track and dcc

vincent marino
 

I run eztrack and dcc. The track is fine as long as you drop feeders often, the turnouts are a different story, they require a lot of tweaking to work properly. The dcc connection is fine it's the electric frogs that will short the power district if you don't tweak the rolling stock and the locos to run smoothly in a consist. Tip. Put all the turnouts on a separate power district. 


On Wed, Apr 3, 2019, 10:40 AM <staceyatvt@...> wrote:
i was wondering is it possable to run dcc on my ez track (silver/nickle) and what i need to buy